Galleries & Museums

Galleries & Museums
23 Tile Project Space
19 Pirelli HangarBicocca
2 Brand New Gallery
14 Marsèlleria
6 Galleria Monica De Cardenas
22 Federica Schiavo
5 Galleria Raffaella Cortese
4 Fondazione Carriero
20 Fondazione Prada
21 Galleria Lia Rumma
7 Massimo De Carlo
17 Francesca Minini
11 kaufmann repetto
12 Lisson Gallery
26 ZERO...
9 Fanta Spazio
24 La Triennale
1 Armada
13 Gió Marconi
3 Cardi Gallery
10 Istituto Svizzero
16 miart
18 Peep-Hole
25 Fondazione Nicola Trussardi
8 Le Dictateur
15 MEGA
Galleries & Museums
Tile Project Space

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Pirelli HangarBicocca

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Pirelli HangarBicocca

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Pirelli HangarBicocca

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Brand New Gallery

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Brand New Gallery

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Marsèlleria

Marsèlleria Via Privata Rezia 2, 20135

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Marsèlleria

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Galleria Monica De Cardenas

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Galleria Monica De Cardenas

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Federica Schiavo

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Federica Schiavo

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Galleria Raffaella Cortese

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Galleria Raffaella Cortese

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Fondazione Carriero

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Fondazione Prada

Fondazione Prada Milano Largo Isarco 2, 20139

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Fondazione Prada

Fondazione Prada Osservatorio Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II,

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Fondazione Prada

Fondazione Prada Milano Largo Isarco 2, 20139

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Fondazione Prada

Fondazione Prada Milano Largo Isarco 2, 20139

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Galleria Lia Rumma

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Massimo De Carlo

Galleria Via Ventura/Lambrate Via G. Ventura 5, 20134

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Massimo De Carlo

Palazzo Belgioioso Piazza Belgioioso 2, 20121

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Francesca Minini

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kaufmann repetto

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kaufmann repetto

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Lisson Gallery

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ZERO...

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Fanta Spazio

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La Triennale

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La Triennale

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Armada

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Gió Marconi

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Cardi Gallery

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Istituto Svizzero

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Gió Marconi

Via A. Tadino 20, 20124

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kaufmann repetto

Via di Porta Tenaglia 7, 20121

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Galleria Raffaella Cortese

Via A. Stradella 1, 4, 7, 20129

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Brand New Gallery

Via C. Farini 32, 20159

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Cardi Gallery

Corso di Porta Nuova 38, 20121

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Galleria Monica De Cardenas

Via F. Viganò 4, 20124

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Massimo De Carlo

Via G. Ventura 5 / Palazzo Belgioioso, Piazza Belgioioso 2,

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Pirelli HangarBicocca

Via Chiese 2, 20126

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Istituto Svizzero

Via del Vecchio Politecnico 3, 20121

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Lisson Gallery

Via B. Zenale 3, 20123

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miart

Viale L. Scarampo, 20149

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Francesca Minini

Via Massimiano 25, 20134

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Galleria Lia Rumma

Via Stilicone 19, 20154

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La Triennale

Viale E. Alemagna 6, 20121

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ZERO...

Viale Premuda 46, 20129

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Marsèlleria

Via privata Rezia 2, 20135

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Fondazione Nicola Trussardi

Piazza E. Duse 4, 20122

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Le Dictateur

FutureDome, Via Paisiello 6,

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Fondazione Prada

Largo Isarco 2, 20139 / Osservatorio Fondazione Prada,

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Fondazione Carriero

Via Cino del Duca, 4, 20122

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Fanta Spazio

Via Merano 21, 20127

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Tile Project Space

Via Garian 64, 20146

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Armada

Via Privata Don Bartolomeo Grazioli 73, 20161

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MEGA

Piazza Vetra 21, 20123

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Federica Schiavo

Via Barozzi 6, 20122

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10 Corso Como

Corso Como 10 - 20154

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Bar Basso

Via Plinio 39 - 20129

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La Belle Aurore

Via Privata G. Abamonti 1 - 20129

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Fioraio Bianchi Caffè

Via Montebello 7 - 20121

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Carminio

Via Del Carmine 3 - 20121

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Carpaccio

Via L. Palazzi 19 - 20124

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Charmant

Via G. Colombo 42 - 20133

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Grand Hotel et de Milan

Via A. Manzoni 29 - 20121

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Lile in cucina

Via F. Guicciardini 5 - 20129

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Panificio Davide Longoni

Via G. Tiraboschi 19 - 20135

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Pasticceria Marchesi

Via Santa Maria alla Porta 11a - 20123

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Trattoria Masuelli San Marco

Viale Umbria 80 - 20135

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La Nuova Arena

Piazza Lega Lombarda 5 - 20154

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Pavé

Via F. Casati 27 - 20124

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Antica Trattoria della Pesa

Viale Pasubio 10 - 20154

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Picchio

Via Melzo 11 - 20129

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Piero e Pia

Piazza D. Aspari 2 - 20129

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Polpetta DOC

Via B. Eustachi 8 - 20129

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Vivaio Riva

Via Arena 7 - 20123

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Osteria del Treno

Via San Gregorio 46 - 20124

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Violette

Via P. Castaldi 14 - 20124 

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Fonderia Artistica Battaglia

Via Stilicone 10 - 20154

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Mandarin Oriental

Via Andegari 9 - 20121

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Pasticceria Cucchi

Corso Genova 1 - 20123

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Otto

Via Paolo Sarpi 10 - 20154

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DRY Cocktails & Pizza

Via Solferino 33 - 20121

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Capetown Café

Via Vigevano 3 - 20144

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Pisacco

Via Solferino 48 - 20121

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CONVERSO

CLS Architetti - San Paolo Converso Piazza S. Eufemia, Milano - 20122

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Sara Enrico
à terre, en l’air

28 February – 02 April
Open only by appointment

Opening 27 February from 7pm

Via Garian 64, 20146

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Into the dance language, the term à terre indicates the steps that are executed on the ground, while en l'air indicates those steps that are performed detaching yourself from the floor.

On the occasion of her solo exhibition, Sara Enrico reinterprets TILE like a space marked by lines on which compose a score.

Imagining time and space of the exhibition being inspired by the choreographic language, the artist has installed her works creating an interaction between every piece and between them and the audience, introducing us to a particular agency of the artworks. These elements are in fact conceived as surfaces and volumes that hide different degrees of actions suggested and sometimes stifled by the stratification of different steps of the production. Following movements of addition and subtraction, the artist performs processes of translation and transformation that allow us, between the manual and digital, a new reading, both material and conceptual, of the ideas.

These works are usually realized as tubular and simplified forms, filled spaces and rewritings of objects taken from different environments. They are bodies in stasis which feature anthropomorphic traits, demanding our gaze to perform a new stance. As elements of a stage, the artworks create a context in which act and the narration begins from their surfaces. Materials, detained gestures, stratifications, shapes and positions within the space are featured as linguistic elements that broaden the thought on the object from a visual approach to a tactile and cultural one. Artist and viewer surround the sculptures in an intimate dialogue, creating a waiting area and a mutual observation.

The artist and the curators thank Vittorio Micucci for supporting the exhibition.

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Osgemeos “Efêmero”
curated by Cedar Lewisohn

21 April – 23 April
Thursday – Sunday
10 am-10 pm

Opening 20 April

Via Chiese 2, 20126

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Pirelli HangarBicocca presents the new public mural, Efêmero, the first large-scale mural in Italy by OSGEMEOS, who are among the world’s most renowned contemporary artists. This work on the outer walls of Pirelli HangarBicocca, to be inaugurated on April 20, 2016, is part of the new three-year project “Outside the Cube," which will involve innovative new approaches to art in public space and a rich calendar of parallel events. The industrial site of Pirelli HangarBicocca, where in the last century trains were made, will become the ideal setting for the work of OSGEMEOS and the many artists to follow.

The project at Pirelli HangarBicocca will delve deeper into the artist’s unique universe of mysterious symbolism and alternative realities. OSGEMEOS’s works often huge in scale, matched with its distinctive patterns and colour schemes, referencing the natural world and improvisation of Sao Paulo. The project will explore the history and spectacular architectural setting of Pirelli HangarBicocca, using the site as a starting point for an iconic new production. The mural will not only be painted on the buildings facade but be incorporated into the buildings architecture. This is an ongoing theme in the artists work, to create murals that transform the facade of a building into a new structure. The project will be accompanied by a limited edition catalogue designed by the artists. The book will explore further the artists history of architectural interventions and include images of their works that have repurposed the built environment.

Curated by artist and writer Cedar Lewisohn - who has authored many publications on art, and curated the exhibition “Street Art at Tate Modern” in 2008 - the project by OSGEMEOS will occupy the two outer walls of Pirelli HangarBicocca’s Cubo space, covering a total area of a thousand square meters. It will also be visible from the nearby train tracks and from the street.

OSGEMEOS, literally meaning “the twins,” is the pseudonym of Brazilian twin brothers Gustavo and Otavio Pandolfo (b. 1974 in Sao Paulo). This artistic duo, whose roots are in hip-hop culture and graffiti, began in the 1980s to develop a highly sophisticated oeuvre recognizable for its dreamlike landscapes and poetic figures, drawing on a vast range of cultural, social and political references.

Laure Prouvost “GDM – Grand Dad’s Visitor Center”
curated by Roberta Tenconi

18 October – 09 April
Thursday – Sunday
10 am-10 pm

Opening 18 October from 7 pm

Via Chiese 2, 20126

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“GDM – Grand Dad’s Visitor Center,” curated by Roberta Tenconi, is a Gesamtkunstwerk that brings together over fifteen works, including installations, videos and projections, sculptures and found objects: together, they form a personal museum dedicated to the artist’s grandfather, a place built in shifting layers, where architecture and content complete each other. The works on view include If It Was (2015), Into All That Is There (2015), We Know We Are Just Pixels (2014), Grandma’s Dream (2013), Before, Before (2013), The Wanderer (God First Hairdresser / Gossip Sequence) (2013), I Need to Take Care of My Conceptual Granddad (2010), The Artist (2010), and Monolog (2009).

Laure Prouvost’s work ranges freely between different systems of representation, alternating fiction, nonsense, and an imaginary, dreamlike world with the concrete reality of everyday life and human perceptions. Her projects combine a nai?f, bric-a-brac aesthetic with ordinary objects and maze-like installations, as well as unstable structures and an elaborate use of technology. By sharpening and engaging all of the visitor’s senses, including smell and taste, they work to broaden the imagination and stretch the boundaries of visual reality.

In her videos, Prouvost plays with the lexicon of pop music, mass culture, and internet imagery. She employs a surfeit of images, incorporates text, and uses feverish editing to alter the normal flow of the narrative, while the presence of her own voice and the direct participation of the viewer—who is pulled into the thick of it and often invited to perform actions—eliminate the conventional distance between cinematic fiction and its audience.

Recurring themes and motifs in Laure Prouvost’s work include the transformation and reversal of meanings, the adaptation of text into image, and the transposition of film into sculpture, as well as the linguistic overlaps generated by the translation of French, her mother tongue, into English, the language she has picked up over almost two decades in London.

Language is something I am constantly tackling. Coming to England definitely led to new levels of misunderstanding and miscommunication. You create your own vision of things and sometimes those visions push language further than the original meaning of words (Laure Prouvost, 2012)

“GDM – Grand Dad’s Visitor Center” is an exhibition that unfolds through disorienting spaces and paradoxical settings: a beauty parlor, mirrored walls and surfaces, tilted and angular rooms, dark and twisting corridors, an area where tea is served and a karaoke zone. The exhibition alternates light and sound, images and written words, moments of peaceful contemplation and outbursts of euphoria, in an entrancing journey that draws visitors in and demands their total engagement.

This project revolves around the story of Laure Prouvost’s grandfather, a prolific conceptual artist and close friend of famous German Dadaist Kurt Schwitters. After digging a long tunnel from his studio to Africa, he supposedly vanished into it one day for good, leaving his wife—Prouvost’s grandmother—as the sole guardian of his works. More specifically, the idea for the Visitor Center took shape in 2013 with the video installation Wantee, which includes several sculptures by this grandfather, now transformed into household objects, and shows her grandmother talking about the need to take care of them by creating this bizarre museum. The construction of the Visitor Center hints at a broader inquiry into the very meaning of museums, as places meant to preserve artworks for the future. In the video If It Was (2015) Prouvost challenges museum conventions: she imagines a place where people can dance and sing, where visitors are greeted with a warm kiss, and can do Zumba or pet the artworks. But above all, where the dark, dusty past takes on meaning in the present and future, where visitors can travel “through the tunnel of history” towards “other places.”

One of the most significant works in the show is The Wanderer (God First Hairdresser / Gossip Sequence) (2013), an installation that meticulously recreates the setting of a hair salon, which visitors can enter to watch the title video. The work is one of seven components making up The Wanderer, a project that transforms Scottish artist Rory MacBeth’s surreal translation of Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis (made without knowing German or even using a dictionary) into images and sculptures. Prouvost’s version takes the fog of translation even further, yielding a bizarre narrative in which Gregor, the protagonist, is lost in an absurd and literally upside-down world, amid bunkers, Cold War scenarios, and his mother’s African hairdressing salon.

The theme of identity is also key to the genesis of the grandfather character, who turns up in various works on view at Pirelli HangarBicocca. He is evoked for the first time in I Need to Take Care of My Conceptual Grandad (2010)— shot in London at the studio of artist John Latham (1921-2006), for whom Prouvost worked as an assistant for several years—then in The Artist (2010), and finally in Wantee (2013) and Grandma’s Dream (2013)—this last video shot inside the grandmother’s bedroom, a fanciful, completely pink chamber that seems to invite reverie.

Miroslaw Balka CROSSOVER/S
Curated by Vicente Todolí

16 March – 30 July
Thursday – Sunday
10 am-10 pm

Opening 15 March 7 pm

Via Chiese 2, 20126

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Renowned since the Eighties, Miroslaw Balka’s first works focused on the human figure, represented through commonly used materials such as wood, ash and soap. In the Nineties, Balka (1958, Warsaw) then abandoned anthropomorphic sculpture in favour of forms – such as beds, platforms and fountains – that allude to human presence but without ever representing it.
The exhibition at Pirelli HangarBicocca is the first solo show in Italy devoted to the artist and it presents a selection of some of his main projects and sculptures.
Balka has exhibited at various international institutions, such as The National Museum of Art, Osaka (2000); K21, Düsseldorf (2006); MAM, Rio de Janeiro, and IMMA, Dublin (2007); Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid (2010). He has also participated in various international shows, featuring five times at the Venice Biennale (1990, 1993, 2003, 2005, 2013), and was at Documenta, Kassel (1992); the Biennale of Sydney (1992, 2006) and at the Santa Fe International Biennial (2006). In 2009 he presented the How It Is project for “The Unilever Series” at the Tate Modern, London.

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Ori Gersht
“The Floating World”

24 January – 09 March
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am-7pm (close 1-2.30 pm)

Opening 24 January from 7pm to 9pm

Via C. Farini 32, 20159

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The photographs that comprise Ori Gersht’s series Floating World were made in November 2015 on a visit that the artist made to the Zen gardens located in and around Kyoto in Japan. These gardens are self-contained worlds. They were created to reflect the essence of nature and as aids to meditation. Both real and metaphysical places, they are somewhere where time stands still.

Gersht chose to work in locations in the gardens where nature is reflected in water. During his post-production process he inverted his photographs and fused them to create new spaces that hover between material and virtual realities. The resulting prints are fundamentally dependent on something that exists in the physical world, but because of the melting together of tangible reality and its reflection, they are not literal depictions of it. The photograph becomes an image of the folding of space and time.

Ori Gersht has always been interested in different layers of time and experience; in what the camera can reveal and in what it can’t.

Bosco Sodi
"In Saecula Saeculorum"

17 March – 11 May
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am-7pm (close 1-2.30 pm)

Opening 16 March from 7pm

Via C. Farini 32, 20159

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Nautilus - Part 1
curated by Zoe De Luca

08 February – 03 March
Monday – Friday
10am-6pm (closed 1-2 pm)

Opening 08 February 7-9 pm

Marsèlleria
Via Privata Rezia 2, 20135

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“Captain Nemo,” I told my host, who had just stretched out on a couch, “this is a library that would do credit to more than one continental palace, and I truly marvel to think it can go with you into the deepest seas.”

“Where could one find greater silence or solitude, professor?” Captain Nemo replied. “Did your study at the museum afford you such a perfect retreat?”
“No, sir, and I might add that it’s quite a humble one next to yours. You own 6,000 or 7,000 volumes here...”

“12,000, Professor Aronnax. They’re my sole remaining ties with dry land. But I was done with the shore the day my Nautilus submerged for the first time under the waters. That day I purchased my last volumes, my last pamphlets, my last newspapers, and ever since I’ve chosen to believe that humanity no longer thinks or writes. In any event, professor, these books are at your disposal, and you may use them freely.”

This dialogue from Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea was a reference point in Georges Perec's Brief Notes on the Art and Manner of Arranging One's Books, in a chapter dedicated to the challenge of keeping a limited number of volumes in one’s library. According to the author, the dilemma is about how to maintain the selection of books not to miss recent publications of interest, neither to loose essential publications from the past: clearly, the only solution is a constant update of the library, an endless struggle for a satisfying balance. Perec’s book was published in 1985, three years after his death and many years before the evolution of the web as a common research and archive tool.

Back to Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, Captain Nemo was not only a character relating with the topic of the ultimate archive, but his motivation to travel the world on board of the Nautilus - seeking revenge for oppressed and forgotten communities - leads us to globalization, another issue of culture in recent times.

Thinking of transformation not as a transition but as a stable, unavoidable condition, Nautilus - Part 1 aims to display this idea of fruition-driven necessary compromise: a - obviously limited - number of artists and artworks dealing with the contemporary notion of tradition and memory, world history record and reconstruction, fruition through linear time.

ZDL

1999
Curated by Siliqoon

16 March – 14 April
Monday – Friday
10am-6pm (closed 1-2 pm)

Opening 16 March from 7pm to 9pm

Via privata Rezia 2, 20135

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Claudia Losi
“Asking Shelter”

18 January – 18 March
Tuesday – Friday, 10 am-7 pm (closed 1-3 pm)
Saturday 12-7 pm

Opening 18 January from 6.30 pm

Via F. Viganò 4, 20124

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In this exhibition Claudia Losi presents a cycle of new works, creating a sort of open ecosystem inside the space of the gallery.
The central nucleus is the project Asking Shelter: a series of sculptures that represent archaic, essential huts constructed with rose branches cast in bronze, that have shapes of shelters existing since thousands of years in different areas of the planet - highly symbolic and narrative forms. They offer shelter and safety, but also oblige us to stay alert, they might also harbor danger. On some of the branches there are silver reproductions of small metamorphic insects that have backs backs like rose thorns (from the family of the Membracidae).

At the entrance to the exhibition there is a photographic enlargement of a fertilized human ovum taken from a science textbook from the 1960s. It resembles a planetary system ready to receive something else, to multiply, to create a new body - ecosystem. This composite image of a system that contains other systems returns in the globular silk sculpture suspended from the ceiling. In the following room we find silk fabrics colored with vegetal dyes, printed with images of animals juxtaposed by resemblance, recalling the caves where thousands of years ago our ancestors drew their own cosmologies, populating the spaces with beings who shared their habitat: here the animals become ethereal witnesses of the events of the world.

The itinerary closes with a series of works about the metamorphic and fragile being par excellence: the butterfly. Wall projections and images of butterflies and moths etched on marble slabs show them as they feed, emerge from the chrysalis or seek the last autumn warmth. Once again, vulnerability and the search for protection become synonymous with the human desire to find comfort, to find meaning in the things that surround us. An open ecosystem that welcomes but can also repel, that changes its quality and can become something other than itself.

Rä di Martino
"The Day He Swims thru Marrakech"

22 March – 13 May
Tuesday – Friday 10 am-7 pm (closed 1-3 pm)
Saturday 12-7 pm

Opening 22 March

Via F. Viganò 4, 20124

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Clara Brörmann
“Horizonte”

31 January – 11 March
Tuesday - Saturday
12 pm - 7 pm

Opening 31 January from 6 pm

Via Barozzi 6, 20122

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Federica Schiavo Gallery is delighted to present Horizonte, a solo show by the German painter Clara Bro?rmann.

Horizonte brings together a selection of new canvases of multi-layered paint in an exploration of gesture, colours and shapes. Intricate in their construction and condensed in their temporality, Brormann’s paintings oscillate between composition and coincidence, in a merger of medium and image.

By layering and destroying geometric and graphic forms, the artist constructs an equilibrium between consistent composition and destructive gesture: earlier stages of the painting come to the surface, making possible for new shapes to emerge.

Bro?rmann, by drawing lines across vibrating colour fields, brings along some order and through a process of continuous conversation with the canvas, reveals an unexpected, narrative structure which emerges from the formal composition.

The numerous steps in the painting process generate a temporal and spatial simultaneity in which the viewer is free to intrude into, in search for a personal interpretation that eventually places the abstract forms into a familiar context. This happens manifestly in the artworks on display from the Horizont and Spiegelachsenbild series, where the symmetrical relationship between the two canvases evokes a spatial dimension, a universal feeling started by a visual process.

“You are looking at the sea. Standing at the shore, just at the edge of the water and watching the horizon you feel weightless. There is no ground in your focus. There is neither top nor bottom, but the sky and the sky reflected on the water.

Then you try to perceive this space, your eyes wandering along the dividing line - the horizon. It is impossible to grasp the total of the space at once. You will need many glances.

Can painting bear this kind of spacial experience? Then we are talking about abstract landscape paintings, aren’t we? How can I possibly create such paintings?

A horizontal line evokes space. With symmetry and doubled images I am setting up this line. The diptychs and the reflected canvases in the exhibition are built around a central mirror axis. Taking this axis as horizon, the paintings can create fantastic landscapes in your mind.

Through outlining an abstract, pictorial space I want to share an experience of landscape with the viewer. Although, of course, the paintings still remain paintings: images, created objects.”

Clara Brormann

Andrea Sala
"The Phantom of the Anvil"

23 March – 13 May
Tuesday - Saturday
12 pm - 7 pm

Opening 22 March From 6pm

Via Barozzi 6, 20122

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Building hammers to cast iron. Drawing tools’ shapes for a precise purpose, strictly related to the physical effort involved in their use; heavy tools and flat sides to hit with maximum strength, small rounded heads to hit in repetition curved metallic bits still incandescent. Andrea Sala is imagining the history of the objects that began with the same tools used to construct these objects. “Any constructed form will never be beautiful if the tool used to forge it is not as beautiful”. Sala is fascinated by forms and the domino-like nature of the production chain where it’s almost impossible to guess the beginning: to closely observe a tool, built and modelled so that it can be used to forge something else again used to assemble another object and yet another, without possibly seeing the end of the process. [...] The shape of hammers and anvils – place of ancient sounds, movements, stokes and bangs – it is the artisanal mould of countless objects, the origin of thousands of geometries.

Andrea Sala (Como, 1976) – has worked between Milan and Montreal – investigates the world of manufactured goods, the world of architecture and the true nature of materials in such a manner only a true sculptor could do. At Federica Schiavo Gallery with a new series of work and in bookstores with a new artist-book “Tachipirina”, RAWRAW editions, curated by Davide Giannella, the Italian artist meticulously dissects the world of objects. His hands moulding details, splinters of reality or hidden corners that, in Sala’s story summarize in a small fragment the more extended tale of a scene. [...] When looked at closely, explored as it develops, the construction process of an object is a tale on its own, made of parts to be joined, both enigmatic and self- evident, obvious like the history of our materialistic culture. Intimate, mechanical and handcrafted, Sala’s work comes to life from a gigantic, limitless canvas. Surrounded by the metallic sound of hand-made hammers.

(Extract from the text by Francesco Garutti for “ICON Design” - January 2017)

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Karla Black

22 November – 25 February
Tuesday – Saturday
10 am-7.30 pm (closed 1-3 pm)

Opening 22 November from 7pm to 9pm

Via A. Stradella 1, 4, 7, 20129

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Black is regarded as one of the pioneering contemporary artists of her generation practicing a kind of lyrical autonomous sculpture, influenced by psychoanalysis and feminism in its impact on visual art. Her works explore material and physical experience as a way of communicating and understanding the world around us. She is interested in ideas of play and early childhood learning as well as the raw creative moment when art comes into being. Black’s work draws from a multiplicity of artistic traditions from expressionist painting, land art, performance, to formalism.

For her exhibition at the gallery, Black creates a series of abstract sculptures carefully arranged on the floor or suspended from the ceiling using a combination of everyday materials including powder, cotton wool along with more traditional media such as plaster, chalk, acrylic paint, paper, cellophane. In a process of experimenting and playing with specific textures she transforms the different materials into elegant and ephemeral objects. Delicate, messy, sensuous, and visceral, they testify to a physical experience of the world that lies beyond metaphorical and symbolic references in a never-ending process of experimenting.

Monica Bonvicini

23 March – 26 April
Tuesday – Saturday
10 am-7.30 pm (closed 1-3 pm)

Opening 23 March

Via A. Stradella 1, 4, 7, 20129

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"Pascali Sciamano"
Curated by Francesco Stocchi

24 March – 24 June
Monday – Friday by appointment | Saturday free entry
11 am-6 pm

Opening 23 March 7 pm

Via Cino del Duca, 4, 20122

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The exhibition aims to present the work of the artist Pino Pascali (Bari, 1935 – Rome, 1968), in dialogue with what is commonly known as “Tribal Art.”

The exhibition title “Pascali Sciamano” refers to the artist’s magical way of seeing the world, from animal/individual identification phenomena to all kinds of classifying, logical, and symbolic needs akin to an animist notion.

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Kienholz “Five Car Stud”
curated by Germano Celant

19 May – 09 April
Mon / Wed / Thu, 10 am-7 pm
Fri / Sat / Sun, 10 am-9 pm

Opening 19 May from 7pm to 9pm

Fondazione Prada Milano
Largo Isarco 2, 20139

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The exhibition brings together a selection of artworks by Edward Kienholz and Nancy Reddin Kienholz, including the well-known installation that gives the show its title.

Five Car Stud was created by Edward Kienholz from 1969 to 1972, and first exhibited at documenta 5 in Kassel, curated by Harald Szeemann. A life-sized reproduction of a scene of racial violence, Five Car Stud is considered one of the American artist’s most significant works. Despite the controversy and attention that it earned from critics right from its debut, the piece remained hidden from view in the storage of a Japanese collector for almost forty years. The artwork was only presented once again to the viewing public in 2011 and 2012 following restoration, first at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and then at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art in Denmark. Today the artwork is part of the Prada Collection, and is being shown for the first time ever in Italy as part of this exhibition, where it forms the central nucleus of an exhibition path that runs from the Sud gallery to the Deposito, and extends into an external space, presenting 25 artworks including sculpture, assemblages and tableaux realized by the Kienholzes from 1959 to 1994, as well as documentation material on the history and making of Five Car Stud.

Defined by Kienholz as the representation of the “burden of being an American,” Five Car Stud recreates a dark, isolated environment, illuminated merely by the headlights of four automobiles and a pickup truck. At the center of the scene lies an African-American, knocked to the ground and surrounded by five white men wearing Halloween masks. The aggressors hold him, grabbing his arms and legs, while one of them prepares to castrate him. There is also a sixth masked man holding a shotgun in vigil, while a white woman who had been on a date with the victim is now forced to watch, shocked and powerless, as the white attackers inflict their punishment. A frightened boy, the young son of one of the perpetrators, also witnesses the scene from the passenger seat of his father’s car. The black figure has a double face: an internal face in wax expressing sadness and resignation, and a transparent external face that displays a monstrous grimace of terror and rage. The torso, however, is built out of an oil pan inside of which six letters float, which might form the word “nigger.”

Five Car Stud catapults the viewer into a nightmarish situation, immersing him and her in a dimension – either removed or forgotten– of extreme violence. More than forty years after it was first created, the artwork’s expressive force, its powerful symbolic charge and the lucidity of the accusation against racial persecution retain their original strength.

“Give Me Yesterday”
Curated by Francesco Zanot

21 December – 12 March
Monday – Friday, 2-8 pm
Saturday – Sunday, 10 am-8 pm

Opening 21 December from 7pm

Fondazione Prada Osservatorio
Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II,

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In un percorso che comprende i lavori di 14 autori italiani e internazionali (Melanie Bonajo, Kenta Cobayashi, Tomé Duarte, Irene Fenara, Lebohang Kganye, Vendula Knopova, Leigh Ledare, Wen Ling, Ryan McGinley, Izumi Miyazaki, Joanna Piotrowska, Greg Reynolds, Antonio Rovaldi, Maurice van Es), il progetto esplora l’uso della fotografia come diario personale in un arco di tempo che va dall’inizio degli anni Duemila a oggi.

In un contesto caratterizzato dalla presenza pervasiva di dispositivi fotografici e da una circolazione ininterrotta di immagini prodotte e condivise grazie alle piattaforme digitali, una generazione di giovani artisti ha trasformato il diario fotografico in uno strumento di messa in scena della propria quotidianità e dei rituali della vita intima e personale. Consapevoli delle ricerche di autori come Nan Goldin e Larry Clark negli Stati Uniti o Richard Billingham e Wolfgang Tillmans in Europa, i fotografi presentati in “Give Me Yesterday” sostituiscono l’immediatezza e la spontaneità dello stile documentario con un controllo estremo dello sguardo di chi osserva ed è osservato. Creano così un nuovo diario nel quale si confonde la fotografia istantanea con quella allestita, si imita la catalogazione ripetitiva del web e si usa la componente performativa delle immagini per affermare un’identità individuale o collettiva.

Slight Agitation 2/4: Pamela Rosenkranz

08 February – 14 May
Mon / Wed / Thu, 10 am-7 pm
Fri / Sat / Sun, 10 am-9 pm

Opening 08 February from 7pm to 9pm

Fondazione Prada Milano
Largo Isarco 2, 20139

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Curated by the Fondazione Prada Thought Council, whose current members are Shumon Basar, Cédric Libert, Elvira Dyangani Ose, and Dieter Roelstraete, “Slight Agitation” continues with a second instalment by Pamela Rosenkranz (Switzerland, 1979). She follows on from Tobias Putrih (Slovenia, 1972), while Laura Lima (Brazil, 1971) and Gelitin, the Austrian collective active since 1993, will produce future chapters.

Pamela Rosenkranz’s work explores how physical and biological processes affect art. Her installation Infection is based on a neuro-active parasite, of which an estimated 30% of the world’s population is affected. A huge, almost sublime mountain of sand is formed inside the Cisterna’s tall spaces. Its scale pressuring against the historic architecture. The sand is impregnated with fragrance of synthetic cat pheromones that activates a specific, biologically determined attraction or repulsion and subconsciously influence the public’s movement. RGB green light illuminates the peak of this chemically altered nature gently evaporating the scent.

Following Tobias Putrih’s instalment—which engaged with ideas of play, politics and emancipation—Pamela Rosenkranz’s chapter continues the Thought Council’s interest in “agitating” the mind and body, senses and space. Rosenkranz’s intervention will be perceived at different distances, which heighten and alter the architecture of the Cisterna. The circular plan, and chemical investigation, is an oblique memory of the Cisterna’s alcohol distilling vats that were formerly housed there. The green light leaking through the Cisterna’s windows, transforms the building into a vitrine, a luminous object sensed from the outside.
It will intensify as day turns to night, engaging with the Fondazione’s nocturnal character. Members of the public will have a direct, intimate experience of the sculptural intervention from a number of angles: at ground level and also from above, emphasizing the formal qualities of the Cisterna: its volume, its heaviness, its religious invocation.
An uneasy feeling around biological determination will engage multiple senses: smell, heat and coldness, mass and density, light and its absence. Pamela Rosenkranz’s intervention furthers the ambitions of “Slight Agitation” by offering immersion into a new sensation of embodiment and collectivity.

“Extinct in the Wild”
curated by Michael Wang

09 February – 09 April
Mon / Wed / Thu, 10 am-7 pm
Fri / Sat / Sun, 10 am-9 pm

Opening 08 February 7-9 pm

Fondazione Prada Milano
Largo Isarco 2, 20139

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Milan, 23 January 2017 – From 9 February to 9 April 2017, Fondazione Prada in Milan will present the project “Extinct in the Wild” curated by Michael Wang. The press preview will be held on Wednesday 8 February from 10 am to 12 pm. A preview of the show, open to the public, will be held on the same day, from 7 to 9 pm. “Extinct in the Wild”, conceived by American artist Michael Wang (1981), brings together flora and fauna that are no longer found in nature, but persist exclusively under human care, within an artificial habitat. Labelled with the officially designated term “extinct in the wild”, these species have left nature behind to fully enter the circuits of human culture. In this project, natural beings such as plants and animals are transplanted into an exhibition and cultural space. In the age of extinction, such displacements are not only aesthetic devices but stand for actual strategies of survival. Michael Wang conceived an exhibition in which three glass and aluminum enclosures with artificial lights accomodate these extinct species within the space of the Nord gallery, where a selection of photographs is also exhibited. Some of those species, such as the ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba) are common in cultivation. Others, like the blue cycad (Encephalartos nubimontanus), are some of the rarest species on earth. Some animals have persisted in artificial conditions for many years, like the aquatic axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum), which was known only from the Aztec canals of Mexico City, most of which have long been drained. Angel’s tears (Brugmansia suaveolens), a plant with fragrant white flowers, disappeared from the wilds of South America with the extinction of the species that distributed its seeds. Nonetheless, its religious significance as a potent psychoactive drug insured its survival in traditional cultivation. Several species have survived only through heroic human efforts. The Hawaiian ?lulu (Brighamia insignis), for instance, whose last specimen was recorded in 2014, was rescued from extinction thanks to a team of botanists who hand-pollinated the very last individuals and collected seeds, by rappelling into the steep ocean cliffs on the island of Kaua’i. The exhibition is completed by a series of 20 photographs, taken by Michael Wang from 2014 to the present day, which portray different extinct in the wild species and the original habitats where they lived prior to their extinction in nature. For the duration of the show, exhibition staff will tend to these living organisms, joining the ranks of gardeners, zookeepers, scientists and hobbyists who are the species’ only lifeline. The curators become caretakers, returning the practice of curation to its ancient roots in cura, meaning “care.” “Extinct in the Wild” is one of the three ex-aequo winning projects (along with those conceived by Evelyn Simons and Adnan Yldiz) of “Curate Award”, an international competition promoted by Fondazione Prada and Qatar Museums. Launched in May 2013, “Curate Award” aims to find new curating talent and to bring about original perspectives in exhibition making. The international jury selected the three winning projects in August 2014 among a large number of submitted proposals from 63 different countries.

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Reinhard Mucha
"Schneller werden ohne Zeitverlust"

24 November – 01 April
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am-7 pm (closed 1.30-2.30 pm)

Opening 24 November from 6.30pm to 9pm

Via Stilicone 19, 20154

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Lia Rumma Gallery is pleased to present the solo exhibition Schneller werden ohne Zeitverlust (Getting Faster without Time Loss) by Reinhard Mucha, which opens on 24 November 2016 at 6.30 p.m. in Milan.
The current show follows Mutterseelenallein, Mucha's exhibition opened on 29 June 1989 in Naples: it was a major event destined to leave its mark on the longlasting relationship between the Gallery and the artist. Those were the years of Mucha's remarkable solo exhibitions at the Kunsthalle Basel (Nordausgang) and Kunsthalle Bern (Kasse beim Fahrer) 1987, of Gladbeck, the show put on in 1986 at the Muse?e National d’Art Moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou, in Paris and the one shown two years previously at the Wu?rttembergischer Kunstverein in Stuttgart.

Mutterseelenallein – All Alone (The seats for attendants and visitors at the “Große Du?sseldorfer Kunstausstellung” shot at the Kunstpalast Ehrenhof in Du?sseldorf on December 30, 1979) is a distinctive museum piece in the form of sixteen wall- mounted display cases made of aluminum, float glass, enamel painted on reverse of glass, felt, 15 black-and-white photographs on baryta paper and wood, accentuating and transforming the gallery space in Naples into a site of melancholic elegance. At the centre of each case – except for one – was a black-and-white photograph of an empty chair. All different, the chairs were those that had been used by gallery attendants or tired visitors during the “Große Du?sseldorfer Kunstausstellung” exhibition, held ten years previously in Du?sseldorf. By examining the concept of the “art exhibition”, the work brought about a feeling of emptiness and loneliness, while also suggesting the poetry of waiting and symbolising the individual character of each of those inconspicuous chairs.

The history of this work is a series of events and moments captured and of poetic coincidences that occurred probably quite by chance. It is the story of an inescapable destiny that for many years has bound the artist to Italy.
Created for the spaces of Lia Rumma Gallery in Naples, the work remained for no less than nine years at the Museum fu?r Moderne Kunst in Frankfurt (M.). Events now lost in time meant that the work would eventually embark on a new journey, to Italy, where it landed once again in 2009 and where it became part of the permanent collection of Castello di Rivoli Museo d'Arte Contemporanea.

Schneller werden ohne Zeitverlust is the latest episode in a long voyage that has been going on for nearly three decades, and the final step in a process that has all the appearance of a homecoming.
Reinhard Mucha is presenting this new exhibition project with at its centre “Die Verwandlung” (“The Metamorphosis”) a model sculpture of the historic Mutterseelenallein installation in Frankurt. A piece in which the history of the work is condensed and where the incorporated video monitors repropose the images of the installation at the museum in Frankfurt. The entire exhibition spreads out from this nucleus, entering into a dialogue with a former industrial area of Milan in which the new gallery building has been constructed. It all fits in here, for the theoretical and conceptual premises at the heart of Mucha’s artistic research are once again able to bind effectively and directly with the architecture in which the exhibition takes shape as well as with the urban landscape surrounding.

In Insel der Seligen (Island of the Blessed), Mucha plays with this context and provocatively shows us a roof of ancient tiles as an image lying on the ground meticulously spread out on a bed of demolition rubble. The sense of drama and the key role of memory, its profound reflections and its criticism on urban reality are all chorally expressed in this profane room installation. It is no coincidence that in The Wirtschaftswunder - To the People of Pittsburgh, included in the exhibition, you can see industrial objects produced inside the factory that was housed in the premises where the artist still has his studio today in one of the former areas of heavy industries in Du?sseldorf.

The exhibition also includes the film Hidden Tracks never previously shown and some more new works that the artist has created over the years. This complete, comprehensive exhibition illustrates the complexity and depth of the work of one of Europe’s greatest contemporary artists. His work borrows direct and indirect references from Minimal Art and Postminimalism as well as from the world of Architecture and Design and refers to the critical discurse on museums praxis and its implicated issues. Combining them in an intimate, personal dimension, on a human scale, and with a powerful sense of transience, Reinhard Mucha creates works with a unique, unmistakable aesthetic and formal presence. These “containers” preside over the motionless portions of reality and everyday life within them. Through their preciseness, alienation and impersonality, these moments of the world convey all the sensations of an alien time, in a constant state construction and deconstruction.

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Diego Perrone
“Herbivorous Carnivorous”

17 January – 11 March
Tuesday – Saturday
11.30 am-7 pm

Opening 17 January from 7pm to 9pm

Galleria Via Ventura/Lambrate
Via G. Ventura 5, 20134

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Diego Perrone’s universal vision and poetics are deeply rooted in the particular mysterious allure of provincial and suburban lives. Rural life and daunting, foggy, landscapes where, in between the hills are small brutalist villas, and is for the artist the epicentre of all neurosis. Perrone challenges these psychotic, but apparently flawless, existences by tiptoeing in and out of a surreal daze inhabited by agricultural machinery, fish, and uncanny shapes.

In Herbivorous Carnivorous Diego Perrone presents a new series of glass sculptures that continue the artists on-going researching and experimenting process with cast glass. Here Diego Perrone challenges the bourgeoisie notion of ordinariness by playing with the feelings of familiar and unfamiliar, personal and impersonal, and addressing the overwhelming yet calming feeling of emptiness.

Gianfranco Baruchello
“Greenhouse”

25 January – 18 March
Tuesday – Saturday
11.30 am-7 pm

Opening 25 January from 7pm to 9pm

Palazzo Belgioioso
Piazza Belgioioso 2, 20121

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Greenhouse brings together an extraordinary selection of works that span from the 1960’s to 2016. Through his long and on going, unique, career Gianfranco Baruchello has explored and materialized through art his interest in the relationship between the mechanisms of the mind and their relationship with urbanism, design, anatomy, agriculture and nature.

In his practice Gianfranco Baruchello, regarded by mentor Marcel Duchamp as his only possible heir, has tackled a vast array of mediums spanning from land art to video via painting and has counted amongst his friends many influential historical figures, artists and thinkers of this and the last century. In the 1970’s after a decade of profitably engaging with the Parisian and New York art scenes, first hand witnessing and participating in the rise of Pop Art and of the then ascending art market, Baruchello decided to move on. Not wanting to abide to the fashions of the moment, he decided to characterise himself as a soloist, moving to the Roman countryside in 1973.

Greenhouse exemplifies Gianfranco Baruchello’s understanding of nature as a language, a biological iconography that encompasses and embodies values, gestures, metamorphoses, empathy and truth. This language becomes tangible through a series of exceptional signature large canvases - populated by minuscule figures and drawings, the iconic 1970’s box compositions, sculptures, and installations.

Greenhouse embodies the heritage of the artist Agricola Cornelia experience: a farm in the Roman hills where the artist lived and worked from 1973 until 1998, which is now the Fondazione Baruchello. Each work becomes a graphic reflection on the relationship between man, nature and the ever-changing urban landscape. For Gianfranco Baruchello nature is an open space that the artist recodifies through miniaturizing, reducing, sculpting and enclosing it. Baruchello’s key topic of the anti-monumental is reshaped through the daily gestures, laying out and maintaining a garden, which mimics and mirrors the one of our mind.

Greenhouse traces a life long reflection on space, shapes and land that tackles the grey area, crude yet oneiric, between the self and the other.

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Riccardo Beretta
“Paravento Playground”

17 January – 18 March
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am-7.30 pm

Opening 17 January from 7pm to 9pm

Via Massimiano 25, 20134

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Paravento Playground, Riccardo Beretta’s (1982) first solo show at Francesca Minini, features a site-specific project, in which innovative and disparate works create a uniquely suggestive atmosphere.

The main piece in the center of the space, with its dynamic lines and flowing forms, is the work Paravento (First Victims Playground) 2015-2017, a large-scale sculpture of inlaid wood, a metaphor for a threshold to be crossed, physical and mental at the same time. Here, the image of the playground intersects with the structure of the screen, an intimate household object, antique and old-fashioned; it is the succession of arches (traditionally connected to the act of crossing, of the passage from one space to another, from inside to outside) which in the work translates the idea of movement and evokes the moment of playing and the recollection of it.

The playground is an area with fluid lines and forms, a space designed to stimulate experiences and memories – individual and collective alike – in children, and then to become, later on, a place capable of triggering in adults memories and sensations that draw on the events of childhood.
The works Recovered Playground 2016-2017, on the walls, act as a counterpoint to the screen: here the adventure of playing is crystalized, frozen in a gesture that becomes a paradigm. We find these colored forms of playgrounds in the silhouettes of the wood panels; in following them our eyes retrace the same dance of children playing on slides.

The theme of the threshold, to cross - with a gaze or with the body – an architectural element, is intrinsically connected to the technique of Terrasanta Relief: a special negative bas-relief on sheets of wood elaborated by the artist. In Riccardo Beretta’s work, this procedure becomes the record of a gesture, of a passage through matter. The sheets of wood are erased to become like the layers of an epidermis. This idea of crossing is, for the artist, also a psychic process, similar to a session of psychotherapy: as in the techniques of EMDR*, the most recent phases of thought are cleared away, letting memories surface and allowing one to cope with traumatic events.

This is also what is recounted in the series of textile works entitled Sleeping Bag (Negative Cognition) 2016-2017; the phrases embroidered onto the sleeping bags that make up the installation are taken from a study by the psychotherapist Cristina Mastronardi about trauma and resilience. They are the negative thoughts of young victims of abuse.

The background of the back of the screen is a black stain and from its carved surface emerge abstract colored and vaguely figurative forms. Between the two sides of the work there is a dichotomy resembling that between movement and stasis, wakefulness and sleep, consciousness and unconsciousness. Perhaps, what Playground represents is indeed that thin line which separates these worlds; perhaps, the sensorial aspect linked to natural woods, their varnishing, their hues and smells, is capable of stimulating memory processes.

While the front side, with its inlays and carvings, is the terrain of limpid memories, stimulated from the image of the playground, the dark backside evokes forbidden images; together, they represent a moment of realization, and, potentially, through the absorption of the trauma, of healing.

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Gianni Caravaggio
“Sais”

19 January – 18 March
Tuesday – Saturday (Monday by appointment)
11 am-7.30 pm

Opening 19 January from 7pm

Via di Porta Tenaglia 7, 20121

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kaufmann repetto is pleased to present Sais, the ninth solo show at the gallery by Gianni Caravaggio.

Sais is the imaginary place described by Novalis in The Novices of Sais, a symbolic novel centered around the dialog between a master and his pupils on the theme of nature and its relationship with men. The book counterposes to an objective concept of nature, seen as an entity ruled by scientific laws, a more subjective and poetic vision of it, suggesting the possibility of an underlying unity behind the apparent duality between subject and object, nature and spirit.

Each one of the four new sculptures installed in the gallery space represents a reflection on nature or and time, key themes in Caravaggio’s research. Here, time is simultaneously depicted in all its different connotations: as an objective and measurable dimension, as a perceived entity and as a mere meteorological event.

In L’orizzonte si posa su una nuvola mentre il sole la attraversa [The horizon rests on a cloud while the sun crosses it], a blue cotton thread delicately lies down on a cloud of nylon threads, taking up and following its irregular shape, whilst a second yellow cotton thread passes through it. Similarly, a yellow cotton thread twirls up around a thin plaster column in another work on show, Il sole avvolge un paesaggio innevato [The sun wraps a snowy landscape].

Fasi lunari che deviano lo spazio [Moon phases that deviate space] is comprised of four aluminium shapes obtained by dividing a cylinder, each one of them representing a different moon phase. Installed on the gallery floor, the four phases deviate the path of a black thread that represents physical space. Their positions will periodically vary during the whole length of the show.

For Coppia con sentimenti antichi [Couple with old sentiments] a clay cylinder has been cut in two with an iron wire before undergoing cooking process. If carefully studied, the marks left by the cut are different on the two halves that, by looking outwards, remind us of the infinity symbol.

In the series of drawings titled Un altro giorno di pioggia [Another rainy day] the sky, represented by brief and spontaneous graphite signs, is connected to earth, a puddle suggested by concentric circles. By representing an essential landscape of a rainy day, the drawings evoke the emotional state of mind usually associated with it; meteoropathy, here, becomes the manifestation of the bonding between the infinitely big and the infinitely small, between celestial events and the physiological changing of the human body. 

Bruce M. Sherman

19 January – 18 March
Tuesday – Saturday (Monday by appointment)
11 am-7.30 pm

Opening 19 January from 7pm

Via di Porta Tenaglia 7, 20121

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Bruce M. Sherman’s works exist between realized and imagined histories. His vessels point towards the totemic traditions of pottery - often including or insinuating functionality through emblematic forms. The sculptures simultaneously utilize these iconographic symbols to evoke surreal and imaginative experiences through the use of Sherman’s unique vernacular.

The pronounced presence of eyes and hands in Sherman’s work alludes to spirituality and investigations of Eastern influences. At the same time, the inclusion of these human features extends discernible humbleness to the personified pieces. The usage of forms and hues found in nature speaks to the mysterious universe at large. Sherman’s works stand like a gathering of many Gods but also like an approachable cluster of companions.

Sherman’s anthropomorphic characters present viewers with a humorous familiarity just shy of something concretely true to a traceable past or present. This fracture leaves us happily at home in the presence between here and there.

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Broomberg & Chanarin
“Trace Evidence”

19 January – 17 March
Monday – Friday: 10 am-6 pm (closed 1-3 pm)
Saturday by appointment

Opening 19 January from 7pm to 9pm

Via B. Zenale 3, 20123

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Trace evidence is created when objects collide or connect and some material is transferred by friction between them. The term is associated with forensic science and the reconstruction of crimes, often describing how people, places and inanimate things interact with each other. An examination of Broomberg & Chanarin’s work over the past decade unearths an approach to photography that is both anthropological and political in nature, characterised by an inherently investigative quality. The artists use photography as a form of conceptual ethnography, immersing themselves into spaces and situations that reveal evidence, residue or traces of past human presence. With abstracted imagery deliberately lacking a central subject or focal point, their refusal to depict or narrativise has become one of their primary tools for communicating the ineffable in war and conflict.

Works on display bring to the fore the duo’s constructions of identity and human behaviour and can be understood as surrogates for missing objects or persons. The exhibition title draws directly from a recent work by Broomberg & Chanarin, created in 2015 for the Freud Museum in London, in which they commissioned a police forensics team to gather DNA samples of hairs and other fibres from the rug covering Freud’s couch. These findings were transformed into a large woven tapestry, mirroring the scale and texture of the original, as well as a number of high-resolution radiographic quartz images, all collated under the rubric of Trace Evidence. When the artists were embedded with the British Army in Afghanistan, rather than photographing the landscape or soldiers in combat, they unrolled lengths of photographic paper to ‘record’ abstract moments. Only the titles the artists later assigned to these compositions – The Day Nobody Died or Repatriation (all 2008) – allude to a time, place or death, combining to create an alternative war diary.

The idea of staging, rehearsal and artifice relates to the artists’ on-going interest in German poet Bertold Brecht and his experiments in poetry and theatre, an influence that is also evident in Portable Monuments (2012). Here the artists use coloured blocks as stand-ins for significant events or characters from newspaper photographs, the resulting fictions are vehicles to explore the documentation, dissemination and currency of media imagery.

Subversive investigations into the mainstream continue in American Landscapes (2009), which spotlight the interiors of commercial photography studios across the USA where images are manufactured, again in opposition to the rules of representation. Physical restriction and personal expression are more closely observed in Red House (2006) – photos of marks and drawings made on the walls of a building in Iraq by Kurdish prisoners – the recorded traces of oppression.

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Yuri Ancarani
THE CHALLENGE

20 January – 04 March
Monday, 3-7 pm
Tuesday – Friday, 11 am-7 pm (closed 1.30-2.30 pm)

Opening 20 January

Viale Premuda 46, 20129

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Marta Ravasi
Violette di Marte

21 January – 12 March
Saturday - Sunday
15-19 or by appointment

Opening 21 January from 5 pm

Via Merano 21, 20127

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VIOLET DE MER

VIOLA DI MARE

VIOLA DI MARTE

VIOLETTE DI MARTE

MARS VIOLET

VIOLET DE MARS

 

The New York International is printed on white paper, the Financial Times is pink.
This year’s nail colour is MINK.
Chanel: Rouge Allure Ink.
Shatush, from brown to blond, is no longer in fashion, people prefer bronde, in between brown and blond.
Armani invented greige - in addition to the unisex. I take my shirt off, he takes off his trousers.
My keyboard is QWERTZ, his is QWERTY.

 

I thought I wanted to learn French, but ...
In my different attempts to look for a painting of which I had a vague memory, but that seemed to be stuck on my forehead since a few days, I throw words like hooks on Google: "Violet de Mer ... I think" ...
In Italian it is called “Limone di mare”. I found it a coincidence that I had just made that painting with shellfish - which however are mussels and not sea figs - and that its colour was precisely violet. Not that violet, Mars Violet – that I just bought, but a violet that can be overlapped.
I also found the title of the painting I was looking for:
“November (Violet de Mars)”, Ben Nicholson, 1963.
Now I think that “Violette di Marte” might be a good title for the exhibition, even though Marte and Marta are quite funny together ...

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Jos de Gruyter & Harald Thys “Elegantia”
curated by Francesco Garutti with the artistic direction of Edoardo Bonaspetti

27 January – 19 March
Tuesday – Sunday 10.30 am-8.30 pm
Thursday 10.30 am-11 pm

Opening 27 January from 7pm

Viale E. Alemagna 6, 20121

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ELEGANTIA is the first solo show hosted by an italian institution of the work by belgian artists Jos de Gruyter and Harald Thys. Conceived as the construction of a precise environment in rigorous dialogue with the rooms of Palazzo dell’Arte, ELEGANTIA has been envisioned as a mise-en-scene of the idea itself of “show”, mental reflection and artificial mirage of an exhibition. Indirectly inspired by the rich, complex and hypertrophic history of production and display that features Triennale and its spaces, the show is the caricature of an architecture, the image of an exhibition about “fine arts”, that reveals itself - after a few moments of estrangement - as an ambiguous catalogue of horrors and only apparent normalities.

In thirty years spent working together - from their first meeting at Sint Lucas University College of Arts and Design of Brussels in 1987 – Jos de Gruyter & Harald Thys have given shape to a heterogenous and complex corpus of works, moving from video production to embrace drawing, painting and sculpture, installation, sound and performance.

Seduced and terrified by the mechanical rules of society - psychology of domination and humiliation - and from the ruthlessness of the everyday, the artists bring to life parallel worlds through the obsessive compiling of catalogues and lists: people, objects, cars, animals, architectural elements and city corners. Figures and characters of fear and innocence, of depravation and lightness are presented on stage without any hierarchy, moral judgement or social interpretation. Flat and motionless, bidimensional and stereotyped, they inhabit an ideal and dystopian space, mute and defenseless witnesses of our world.

The architecture of the show - a spatial and optical device shaping the ambiguous relation between subject and object - is a set-up and a piece in itself: an enfilade of arches in false perspective - almost ironically emphasized by the proportions of its parts - is the manifesto of a monument that flaunts itself to reveal its flat and tragi-comical uselessness.

A series of heads - in plaster and paint, specifically conceived for Triennale di Milano - is aligned along the new gallery’s wings and rooms: these apparently classical heads, are then almost microcephalic specimens of indigenous civilizations, their dilated pupils astonished and frightened in the face of reality. The ponderous white sculptures inhabiting the exhibition are not bodies made out of marble following a golden rule, but heavy bi-dimensional metal figures (White Elements, 2012-2016) with disturbing faces. A sequence of portraits (Les Enigmes de Saarlouis, 2013); a group of clay sculptures (Der Schlamm von Braanst, 2008), coming from an inhuman and perturbing pottery workshop; small experiments on human shape (White Elements, prototipos, 2016); a long series of watercolors with ambiguous and heterogeneous subjects (Fine Arts, 2015) and a high fountain for interiors, merging classic and mechanical shapes (De Drie Wijsneuzen, 2013) complete the body of an exhibition that is enigmatically conservative and subtly revealing.

Among the roman and industrial shapes of Palazzo dell’Arte, De Gruyter & Thys with ELEGANTIA propose a sophisticated experiment on the idea of “display” and its same failure: a possible model of a show that is authorless, bidimensional and deformed like the space of our own minds.

Collezione Giuseppe Iannaccone - Italia 1920-1945
curated by Alberto Salvadori and Rischa Paterlini, with the artistic direction of Edoardo Bonaspetti

31 January – 19 March
Tuesday – Sunday 10.30 am-8.30 pm
Thursday 10.30 am-11 pm

Opening 31 January from 6.30 pm

Viale E. Alemagna 6, 20121

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The Triennale di Milano and Giuseppe Iannaccone are pleased to announce Italy 1920 to 1945. A new figuration and narrative of the self, an exhibition curated by Alberto Salvadori and Rischa Paterlini – curator of Collezione Giuseppe Iannaccone. The exhibition is promoted by Milan Triennale Foundation and Giuseppe Iannaccone, and is part of the Visual Arts program of the Trienniale, directed by Edoardo Bonaspetti.

The exhibition, open to the public from 1 February until 19 March 2017 will unveil, for the first time, a selection of 96 works dating between 1920 and 1945 from the Giuseppe Iannaccone private collection. These chosen works were acquired and personally selected by the collector from 1992 (the year of his first purchase) until 30 November 2016.

During the period of public opening, the itinerary will be enriched by a series of activities, offering the visitors interesting opportunities to learn more about works and the exhibition.
A cycle of round table events will be held with the contributing authors of the catalogue alongside prominent scholars of the history of art specialized in the period of the two wars. The events will be organized by appointment, every Tuesday at 18:30. The first event will focus on the “Collector”, during which there will be also be a presentation of the volume, published by Skira and released in conjunction with the exhibition.

Furthermore, there will be a series of programmed events and guided tours for university students in addition to the usual educational activities organized and coordinated by the Triennale Education department.
Lastly, a docu-film, which explains the different aspects of the artistic period between the wars, will be projected.

The exhibition Italy 1920-1945. A new figuration and narrative of the self was created under the patronage of the Ministry of heritage and tourism and cultural activity, Regione Lombardia, of Milan City Council and Milan chamber of commerce; with the support of Fondazione Credito Bergamasco, Lamborghini Milano; sponsored by AXA Art, Cassina and Open Care. Media partner Artshell and Marie Claire Maison. Catalogue Skira. Thanks toTenuta Sarno 1860.

The graphics at the exhibition were by Mousse Agency, exhibition set up by Oblo? Architetti.

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Massimo Vaschetto
“Uomo Seduto in Regime di Guerra”

03 February – 19 March
Saturday - Sunday
15 - 19 or by appointment

Opening 03 February from 6.30 pm

Via Privata Don Bartolomeo Grazioli 73, 20161

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Armada presents "Uomo Seduto in Regime di Guerra" [man sitting in full battle alert mode], first solo exhibition by Milan based artist Massimo Vaschetto. The show is conceived as an environment where the elements produced for the occasion plus those found in the exhibition space coexist. In this ecosystem, presented by Vaschetto as homogenous and solid, i.e. as a new normality, Vaschetto keeps balance between identities and desires that are simultaneously manifested as well as hidden.

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Will Benedict
“The Social Democrat”

16 February – 24 March
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am-7 pm

Opening 16 February from 7pm

Via A. Tadino 20, 20124

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Arman 'Emersions'

17 February – 23 June
Monday – Friday 10 am-7 pm
Saturday by appointment

Opening 16 February 7-9 pm

Corso di Porta Nuova 38, 20121

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Cardi Gallery in Milan is delighted to present the Italian debut of Arman: Emersions. The exhibition, staged in collaboration with Corice Arman and the Arman Marital Trust, features thirteen works from the series conceived in 1998 and 1999 by the artist, a French-born naturalized American.

 

The Emersions mark a new relationship between painting, which he had practiced since his childhood in Nice, and objects, to which he was drawn starting with his exhibition Allure d’objects (Galerie Saint Germain, Paris, 1960).

“Emersion” is the opposite of immersion; it is the act of surfacing, of coming out of a liquid environment and appearing on the surface, manifested before the eye. The fragmented objects appear to emerge from the organic background after having survived a shipwreck. As Arman commented when creating them: “Many works from this series make you think about natural accidents, such as lava flows or rivers of mud. But a manmade object finds itself drowned in it, as if it were wrong for man to oppose nature.”

These untitled paintings draw their inspiration from the tragic vision of a contaminated human landscape, covered with oil, garbage, or mud. The mineral effect of the surfaces of the objects derives from the metal plating applied to chairs and bicycles, fans, watering cans, and other objects, whereas the uniformity of color derives from the acrylic paint that Arman uses as coating or glue.

The series has only been exhibited once before at the Galerie Piltzer in Paris in 1999, and was published in a limited-edition book, where it is referred to as Nec Mergitur, echoing the motto of Paris, “Fluctuat nec Mergitur”, literally, being tossed by the waves but not sinking.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a richly illustrated book featuring texts by Arman and Marcelin Pleynet, Corice Arman and Chiara Spangaro, and photos of the paintings, the artist at work in his studio, and the Milan exhibition.

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“Jean Tinguely - Si c’est noir, je m’appelle Jean”

16 February – 22 March
Monday – Friday 10.30 am - 5.30 pm
Saturday 2 - 6 pm

Opening 16 February from 6.30 pm

Via del Vecchio Politecnico 3, 20121

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Riprendendo il titolo di un’opera del 1960, l’Istituto Svizzero di Milano si pone l’intento di ricordare al pubblico italiano la ribollente personalità di Jean Tinguely (1925-1991). Con un certo sfasamento e in leggero ritardo, la mostra si ricollega alle varie commemorazioni ed eventi nazionali e internazionali che nel 2016 hanno celebrato i 25 anni dalla scomparsa dell’artista.
 
Nel 1960 lo scultore svizzero si affermava come un elemento di capitale importanza nel pensiero artistico contemporaneo facendo esplodere, e lasciando che si autodistruggesse, la sua scultura Hommage à New York, una rappresentazione, non priva di ironia, del fatto che i sogni moderni erano andati in pezzi già da tempo. Con un fuoco d’artificio simile, scandaloso ed esuberante, scelse di celebrare in Piazza del Duomo a Milano i 10 anni del Nuovo Realismo. Il movimento si era organizzato proprio nella capitale lombarda, in occasione di una mostra alla galleria Apollinaire, intorno al critico Pierre Restany, e riuniva, tra gli altri, Arman, François Dufrêne, Raymond Hains, Yves Klein, Martial Raysse, Daniel Spoerri, Niki de Saint Phalle, Jacques Villeglé e Jean Tinguely. Ecco dunque che la sera del 28 novembre 1970, davanti a una folla gioiosa e chiassosa, esplode La Vittoria, una grande scultura in acciaio dalle forme decisamente esplicite.
 
La mostra raccoglie una parte dei documenti pubblicati e filmati relativi a un evento fondamentale nel pensiero espansivo, iconoclasta e comunicativo di Jean Tinguely.
 
La mostra milanese consente anche di tornare sull’impronta estremamente popolare che questa figura di primo piano dell’arte svizzera ha lasciato su molte generazioni. Grazie alla complicità di due collezionisti, l’Istituto Svizzero ha riunito degli oggetti che hanno contribuito a fissare per lungo tempo l’immagine di Jean Tinguely nella memoria collettiva, in particolare in Svizzera. Così, proprio a Milano, dove Jean Tinguely, insieme agli amici artisti e critici, aveva rimesso in discussione i potenti simboli del consumismo, la mostra si prende gioco della sua vicinanza a una certa idea del pop.

Si ringraziano: Brutus Luginbühl, René & Madeleine Progin, Jean-Marc Rey.

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