Galleries & Museums

Galleries & Museums
20 Pirelli HangarBicocca
26 Fondazione Nicola Trussardi
12 kaufmann repetto
21 Fondazione Prada
14 Gió Marconi
2 Brand New Gallery
15 Marsèlleria
25 La Triennale
5 Galleria Raffaella Cortese
3 Cardi Gallery
7 Galleria Monica De Cardenas
8 Massimo De Carlo
11 Istituto Svizzero
17 miart
18 Francesca Minini
19 Peep-Hole
22 Galleria Lia Rumma
27 ZERO...
9 Le Dictateur
4 Fondazione Carriero
10 Fanta Spazio
24 Tile Project Space
1 Armada
16 MEGA
23 Federica Schiavo Gallery
6 Cortesi Gallery
Galleries & Museums
Pirelli HangarBicocca

,

Open map
Pirelli HangarBicocca

,

Open map
Fondazione Nicola Trussardi

La Triennale di Milano Viale Emilio Alemagna 6, 20121

Open map
kaufmann repetto

,

Open map
Fondazione Prada

Fondazione Prada Milano Largo Isarco 2, 20139

Open map
Fondazione Prada

Fondazione Prada Osservatorio Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II 63, 20121

Open map
Fondazione Prada

Fondazione Prada Milano Largo Isarco 2, 20139

Open map
Gió Marconi

,

Open map
Brand New Gallery

,

Open map
Brand New Gallery

,

Open map
Marsèlleria

,

Open map
La Triennale

,

Open map
Gió Marconi

Via A. Tadino 20, 20124

Open map
kaufmann repetto

Via di Porta Tenaglia 7, 20121

Open map
Galleria Raffaella Cortese

Via A. Stradella 1, 4, 7, 20129

Open map
Brand New Gallery

Via C. Farini 32, 20159

Open map
Cardi Gallery

Corso di Porta Nuova 38, 20121

Open map
Galleria Monica De Cardenas

Via F. Viganò 4, 20124

Open map
Massimo De Carlo

Via G. Ventura 5 / Palazzo Belgioioso, Piazza Belgioioso 2,

Open map
Pirelli HangarBicocca

Via Chiese 2, 20126

Open map
Istituto Svizzero

Via del Vecchio Politecnico 3, 20121

Open map
miart

Viale L. Scarampo, 20149

Open map
Francesca Minini

Via Massimiano 25, 20134

Open map
Galleria Lia Rumma

Via Stilicone 19, 20154

Open map
La Triennale

Viale E. Alemagna 6, 20121

Open map
ZERO...

Viale Premuda 46, 20129

Open map
Marsèlleria

Via privata Rezia 2, 20135

Open map
Fondazione Nicola Trussardi

Piazza E. Duse 4, 20122

Open map
Le Dictateur

FutureDome, Via Paisiello 6,

Open map
Fondazione Prada

Largo Isarco 2, 20139 / Osservatorio Fondazione Prada,

Open map
Fondazione Carriero

Via Cino del Duca, 4, 20122

Open map
Fanta Spazio

Via Merano 21, 20127

Open map
Tile Project Space

Via Garian 64, 20146

Open map
Armada

Via Privata Don Bartolomeo Grazioli 73, 20161

Open map
MEGA

Piazza Vetra 21, 20123

Open map
Federica Schiavo Gallery

Via Barozzi 6, 20122

Open map
Cortesi Gallery

Corso di Porta Nuova 46/B, 20121

Open map
10 Corso Como

Corso Como 10 - 20154

Open map
Bar Basso

Via Plinio 39 - 20129

Open map
La Belle Aurore

Via Privata G. Abamonti 1 - 20129

Open map
Fioraio Bianchi Caffè

Via Montebello 7 - 20121

Open map
Carminio

Via Del Carmine 3 - 20121

Open map
Carpaccio

Via L. Palazzi 19 - 20124

Open map
Charmant

Via G. Colombo 42 - 20133

Open map
Grand Hotel et de Milan

Via A. Manzoni 29 - 20121

Open map
Lile in cucina

Via F. Guicciardini 5 - 20129

Open map
Panificio Davide Longoni

Via G. Tiraboschi 19 - 20135

Open map
Pasticceria Marchesi

Via Santa Maria alla Porta 11a - 20123

Open map
Trattoria Masuelli San Marco

Viale Umbria 80 - 20135

Open map
La Nuova Arena

Piazza Lega Lombarda 5 - 20154

Open map
Pavé

Via F. Casati 27 - 20124

Open map
Antica Trattoria della Pesa

Viale Pasubio 10 - 20154

Open map
Picchio

Via Melzo 11 - 20129

Open map
Piero e Pia

Piazza D. Aspari 2 - 20129

Open map
Polpetta DOC

Via B. Eustachi 8 - 20129

Open map
Vivaio Riva

Via Arena 7 - 20123

Open map
Osteria del Treno

Via San Gregorio 46 - 20124

Open map
Violette

Via P. Castaldi 14 - 20124 

Open map
Fonderia Artistica Battaglia

Via Stilicone 10 - 20154

Open map
Mandarin Oriental

Via Andegari 9 - 20121

Open map
Pasticceria Cucchi

Corso Genova 1 - 20123

Open map
Otto

Via Paolo Sarpi 10 - 20154

Open map
DRY Cocktails & Pizza

Via Solferino 33 - 20121

Open map
Capetown Café

Via Vigevano 3 - 20144

Open map
Pisacco

Via Solferino 48 - 20121

Open map
CONVERSO

CLS Architetti - San Paolo Converso Piazza S. Eufemia, Milano - 20122

Open map
Close

Osgemeos “Efêmero”
curated by Cedar Lewisohn

21 April – 23 April
Thursday – Sunday
10 am-10 pm

Opening 20 April

Via Chiese 2, 20126

View more on Artshell

Pirelli HangarBicocca presents the new public mural, Efêmero, the first large-scale mural in Italy by OSGEMEOS, who are among the world’s most renowned contemporary artists. This work on the outer walls of Pirelli HangarBicocca, to be inaugurated on April 20, 2016, is part of the new three-year project “Outside the Cube," which will involve innovative new approaches to art in public space and a rich calendar of parallel events. The industrial site of Pirelli HangarBicocca, where in the last century trains were made, will become the ideal setting for the work of OSGEMEOS and the many artists to follow.

The project at Pirelli HangarBicocca will delve deeper into the artist’s unique universe of mysterious symbolism and alternative realities. OSGEMEOS’s works often huge in scale, matched with its distinctive patterns and colour schemes, referencing the natural world and improvisation of Sao Paulo. The project will explore the history and spectacular architectural setting of Pirelli HangarBicocca, using the site as a starting point for an iconic new production. The mural will not only be painted on the buildings facade but be incorporated into the buildings architecture. This is an ongoing theme in the artists work, to create murals that transform the facade of a building into a new structure. The project will be accompanied by a limited edition catalogue designed by the artists. The book will explore further the artists history of architectural interventions and include images of their works that have repurposed the built environment.

Curated by artist and writer Cedar Lewisohn - who has authored many publications on art, and curated the exhibition “Street Art at Tate Modern” in 2008 - the project by OSGEMEOS will occupy the two outer walls of Pirelli HangarBicocca’s Cubo space, covering a total area of a thousand square meters. It will also be visible from the nearby train tracks and from the street.

OSGEMEOS, literally meaning “the twins,” is the pseudonym of Brazilian twin brothers Gustavo and Otavio Pandolfo (b. 1974 in Sao Paulo). This artistic duo, whose roots are in hip-hop culture and graffiti, began in the 1980s to develop a highly sophisticated oeuvre recognizable for its dreamlike landscapes and poetic figures, drawing on a vast range of cultural, social and political references.

Rosa Barba "From Source to Poem to Rhythm to Reader"
Curated by Roberta Tenconi

05 May – 08 October
Thursday – Sunday
10 am-10 pm

Opening 04 May 7 pm-midnight

Via Chiese 2, 20126

View more on Artshell

From May 5 to October 8, 2017, Pirelli HangarBicocca presents Rosa Barba’s solo exhibition “From Source to Poem to Rhythm to Reader,” curated by Roberta Tenconi: a project that brings together fourteen works made since 2009, including 35mm and 16mm films, kinetic sculptures, and site-specific pieces.

Barba’s exhibition “From Source to Poem to Rhythm to Reader,” hosted in the Shed space at Pirelli HangarBicocca, weaves an intense dialogue between the works on view and the industrial setting that houses them. The five films in the show, seen here for the first time in Italy, include The Empirical Effect (2009), an exploration of the landscape around Vesuvius as a web of natural, mental, and cultural forces, and the artist's two most recent works: Enigmatic Whisper (2017), shot in the studio of artist Alexander Calder, and From Source to Poem (2016), a densely layered audio-visual narration, increasingly overlapping and condensing, analogous to white noise, filmed in the Audio-Visual Conservation Center of the Library of Congress in Culpeper, Virginia, the world’s largest multimedia archive.

Rosa Barba (b. 1972 in Agrigento, Italy, based in Berlin), whose work has won many awards and been featured at international exhibitions and festivals, has chosen film as her primary tool of expression. For years, Barba has experimented with the language of cinema and sculpture, reflecting on the poetic qualities of the natural and human landscape, exploring the idea of place as a vessel of memory, and dismantling the notion of linear time. Powerfully striking images, portraits of obsolete architecture and natural landscapes, and visions of remote deserts turn up throughout her works, combined with fragments of text and scenarios where past and present intertwine.

“What I try to express in my films is that time is based on individual and smaller collective histories and is a very malleable and flexible phenomenon. In my films there are usually different time scales running parallel. My perspective as an observer is non-judgmental. I assume reality is a fiction that is based on individual interpretations of real events. My movies mostly play with the idea that they could happen in the future as well as in the past and are trying to manifest as a utopian solution.

(Rosa Barba in conversation with Mirjam Varadinis and Solveig Øvstebø, in Time as Perspective, Ostfildern: Hatje Cantz, 2013)

The Exhibition

The 35mm film From Source to Poem (2016), co-produced by Pirelli HangarBicocca and CAPC muse?e d’art contemporain de Bordeaux, France, with the participation of Tabakalera, Donostia, Spain, is shot in Culpeper, Virginia at the Packard Campus for Audio-Visual Conservation, part of the Library of Congress: more than 90 miles of shelves that hold a collection of over four million items, both moving-image (films, videos, television episodes) and audio recordings (music, spoken word, radio broadcasts) in obsolete formats as well as modern digital files. Following on a previous trilogy titled The Hidden Conference (2010- 15)—a project where Barba’s camera explores the storage areas of the Neue Nationalgalerie in Berlin, the Capitoline Museums in Rome, and Tate Modern in London—this new film juxtaposes voices speaking different languages with written text and words, mingling images from the Packard Campus with others shot in the desert, a place the artist considers a vast expanse of memory and an archive in its own right.

Along with desert scenes, Barba often shows us abandoned human landscapes, which have become the wreckage of a past era, places that take on a mysterious significance in our time. For instance, her film Subconscious Society, a Feature (2014) describes the end of the industrial age, alternating between a future “the present” in which protagonists are set in a type of memory theater, an evocative, moldering space, and the past “future”, set in powerful images of the bereft objects and buildings of industrial sites.

Personal histories and events are often the starting point for narratives that walk the line between experimental documentary and science fiction, where it is hard to tell memory from make-believe. The protagonists of The Empirical Effect (2009) are residents of the "red zone” around Vesuvius who survived the volcano’s last eruption in 1944. Blurring together different levels of narration, this film set around Vesuvius—for Rosa Barba a metaphor for the complex relationships between society and politics in Italy—stages an evacuation drill that has never been held.

In Rosa Barba’s practice, personal contact with the people who are tied to a given place is combined with a long, painstaking process of research and investigation. For Enigmatic Whisper (2017), her camera gained access to the studio of American sculptor Alexander Calder (1898-1976) in Roxbury, Connecticut, which has remained untouched since his death in 1976. Barba’s film offers a portrait of one of his sculptures, which has borne witness over many years to the joyful creative universe of this great figure in twentieth-century art history.

Rosa Barba’s work ultimately extends into a conceptual practice where the medium of film is employed to explore any possible aspect of its material, sculptural, and narrative qualities and the ways itarticulates space. Rolls of film or 16mm projectors often become compositional elements in kinetic sculptures that project sequences of colored light, focusing attention on the idea of movement and rhythm.

In The Long Poem Manipulates Spatial Organizations (2014), for instance, the projector is tilted 45 degrees to create a distorted image in which cut-out letters unfold across the screen like the notes of a score.

Whilst in Hear, There, Where the Echoes Are (2016), beams of light and color pour into the space and over visitors through a kinetic installation of sound and light, with five projectors synchronized to the rhythm of a drum score, showing a more performative aspect of Rosa Barba’s work.

On the occasion of the exhibition “From Source to Poem to Rhythm to Reader,” from summer 2017 a catalog titled From Source to Poem will be available with contributions by Rosa Barba, Manuel Borja-Villel, Giuliana Bruno, Joan Jonas, E?lisabeth Lebovici and Roberta Tenconi. The publication is bilingual, Italian and English, and published by Hatje Canz and Pirelli HangarBicocca.

Close
Close

LA TERRA INQUIETA
Curated by Massimiliano Gioni

28 April – 20 August
Tuesday – Sunday
10.30 am-8.30 pm

Opening 27 April from 7 pm

La Triennale di Milano
Viale Emilio Alemagna 6, 20121

View more on Artshell

Organized by the Fondazione Nicola Trussardi
and Fondazione Triennale di Milano
For the Visual Arts Program of the Triennale directed by
Edoardo Bonaspetti

Milan, March 13, 2017 – La Triennale di Milano and the Fondazione Nicola Trussardi present La Terra Inquieta (The Restless Earth), an exhibition curated by Massimiliano Gioni and co-produced by the Fondazione Nicola Trussardi and Fondazione Triennale di Milano, as part of the Visual Arts Program of the Triennale directed by Edoardo Bonaspetti.

The exhibition, which will be open to the public from April 28 to August 20, 2017, is the result of a partnership between two institutions whose missions have always centered on the present, exploring the ways in which the experimental and innovative languages of contemporary art and culture can express radical changes in our world.
 
La Terra Inquieta borrows its title from a collection of poems by Édouard Glissant, a Caribbean writer who probed the question of how different cultures can coexist. The exhibition shares in Glissant’s project—a pressing and necessary one that tries to describe this unstable and agitated present as a polyphony of voices and narratives. Through the works of more than sixty artists from thirty-nine countries—such as Albania, Algeria, Bangladesh, Egypt, Ghana, Iraq, Lebanon, Morocco, Syria, and Turkey—which fill the ground-floor gallery of the Triennale and continue to the floor above, this exhibition charts both experiences and perceptions of migration and the current refugee crisis as an epoch-making transformation that is reframing contemporary history, geography, and culture.
 
La Terra Inquieta lets art take on the task of describing the changes, conflicts, and tensions that cause wars, mass migrations, and natural disasters,” says Clarice Pecori Giraldi, Vice President of La Triennale di Milano. “The Triennale, as a cultural institution keenly attuned to social changes, feels it must help tell this story, and reflect on the nameless multitudes that move ahead day after day in search of dignity. This exhibition, which is part of La Triennale di Milano’s Visual Arts Program, directed by Edoardo Bonaspetti, presents works by over sixty artists internationally which force us to look closely at our own aging world, and remember that not long ago, we were the ones crossing the seas in search of a new life and better opportunities.” 
 
The waves of migration touching every corner of our planet are a vital issue of our era" explains Beatrice Trussardi, President of the Fondazione Nicola Trussardi “one of the key themes around which global society must redefine itself. Hence the need to organize an exhibition like La Terra Inquieta, which takes a look at this issue filtered through the stories of the artists. Thinking about migration led us deep into the heart of a universal experience that links together men and women who come from different generations, religions, cultures, and places, but who are increasingly destined to coexist, sharing their stories, values, and lives. The goal of this exhibition is to convey at least some part of this experience to the public, so it can become a tool of knowledge, providing resources that aid the quest to find harmony between human beings. The fluid, constantly evolving identity of the Fondazione Trussardi has led us to adopt a new approach to tackling the same challenge we posed to ourselves at the outset of our adventure almost fifteen years ago: to describe the world around us by creating a space for shared reflection and a platform where individuals can make their own contributions to envisioning a new model for society."
 
Through installations, videos, documentary images, historical sources, and material artifacts, La Terra Inquieta explores real and imaginary geographies, reconstructing the odyssey of migrants through personal and collective tales of exodus inspired by varying degrees of urgency and longing. The exhibition revolves around a series of geographic and thematic lines of inquiry—the war in Syria, the state of emergency in Lampedusa, life in refugee camps, the figure of the nomad or stateless person, and Italian migration in the early 20th century—which intersect with works that serve as visual metaphors for conditions of mobility and precariousness.
 
Following the unequal and often exploitative exchanges of labor, commodities, and capital in our globalized economy, the exhibition attempts to trace a choral history of the multitudes of migrants who too often remain nameless. At the center of the exhibition is the video installation The Mapping Journey Project by Moroccan artist Bouchra Khalili: with disarming simplicity, the artist collected the stories of migrants who have traveled across entire continents seeking entry to Europe.
Juxtaposing art and reportage, La Terra Inquieta focuses in particular on how artists bear witness to historic events, and how art can address social and political change. Refusing the omniscient narratives of history and the media alike, many artists in the exhibition approach image-making from a personal perspective. The resulting works combine the traditional modes of journalism and documentary with narrative techniques akin to those used in literature, autobiography, and fiction. It is through this clash between dissonant forms of storytelling that many artists bring an element of doubt and critique into the image-based language of the mass media, revealing a new faith in art’s duty to describe and transform the world. Rather than just creating images of conflict, their images provide a space for the exchange of multiple viewpoints and narratives.
 
Together, these stories—poised between historical epic and real-time diary—yield a vision of art as lyrical reportage, sentimental documentary, and vivid, vital testimony. We find examples of this approach in works by John Akomfrah, Yto Barrada, Isaac Julien, Yasmine Kabir, and Steve McQueen, among others, which address specific events as metaphorical readings of broader historical crises. In these works, the very notion of indeterminacy is transformed into a narrative method that engages analytical and critical functions.
 
La Terra Inquieta sparks reflection on the right to one’s own image, another key theme addressed by many contemporary artists whose work takes on mainstream portrayals of global migration and the refugee crisis. Grappling with a public image that is shaped by sensationalist media, many artists of our time seek new ways of depicting migrants without falling into the media pitfalls of staging or spectacularizing tragedy and trauma. The oblique gaze of the photos by Yto Barrada, the elided details in the videos by Mounira Al Solh, or the grotesque transformations in the drawings and animations by Rokni Haerizadeh, are just a few examples—along with the refugee portrayed by Phil Collins—of how artists refuse to aestheticize suffering and instead work to restore the dignity of migrants by portraying them as historical agents or shielding them from the hyper visibility to which they have been subjected. This attitude, coupled with methods drawn from political activism and collective participation, can also be found in artists as diverse as Pawel Althamer, Andrea Bowers, Tania Bruguera, Paulo Nazareth, and Liu Xiaodong.
 
In the work of many contemporary artists, the quest for dignity in images is accompanied by an investigation of sculpture and its commemorative function. Artists Adel Abdessemed, Kader Attia, Banu Cenneto?lu, Meschac Gaba, Thomas Schütte, Andra Ursuta, and Danh Võ engage the tradition of the funerary monument from a contemporary standpoint. Many of the works on view seem unstable and fragile, embracing a strategy of precariousness: stripped of all excesses of sentimentality, these new monuments are instead charged with a sense of indignation.
 
One of the key questions in the exhibition is the function of images in a time of crisis. In the work of many contemporary artists, as art historian T.J. Demos has observed, the image itself becomes “migrant,” seeking truth in crisis while fomenting crisis in the concept of truth as a single, simplistic narrative. Many of the works in the exhibition depict the movement and migration of commodities across borders and barriers, whether ideological or economic. The projects by El Anatsui, Alighiero Boetti, Hassan Sharif, and Mona Hatoum form an atlas of global connections and interactions where art seems to replicate the traffic of goods in the international economy. In these works, the choice of materials and techniques—with their emphasis on mass-produced objects that are recycled or transformed as they move between countries and social contexts—seems to mimic the production, distribution, and outsourcing mechanisms of global industry. Similar issues concern artist Šejla Kameri? and the research groups Forensic Oceanography and multiplicity, who study the movement of people across borders.
 
La Terra Inquieta is the story of humanity crossing borders and—more tragically—of borders crossing humanity. But above all, it is an exercise in empathy and an experiment in cross-cultural dialogue and understanding, which becomes more relevant as Italy stands at the epicenter of the refugee crisis. As we are reminded by the words of Emma Lazarus at the base of the Statue of Liberty—seen in the video by Steve McQueen, which closes the exhibition—the mother of exiles welcomes the tired, the poor, the huddled masses, the tempest-tossed, and the wretched refuse of a teeming shore. 

Close
Close

Pae White
Demimondaine

09 May – 09 September
Tuesday – Friday, 11 am-7.30 pm
Summer break 7 – 20 August

Opening 08 May 6pm - 9pm

Via di Porta Tenaglia 7, 20121

View more on Artshell

kaufmann repetto is pleased to present Demimondaine, Pae White’s sixth solo exhibition with the gallery.

The exhibition title lends itself to the French “demi-monde” or “half-world”, a popular phrase at the turn of the early twentieth century characterizing those living opulent, pleasure-driven lifestyles. The derivative “demimondaine” spoke of the women that lived on the fringe of respectable society, straddling the standards of the “real-world”. Their way of life a challenge of the status quo but existing within the confines of those very ideals - a controlled excess, a chaos within boundaries.

Pae White’s work utilizes both the most advanced technology and skilled artisans to emphasize the simultaneous limitations and intricacies of each and to contort the connotations of the functional versus the decorative. White’s monumental new, digitally woven tapestries are the scale of backdrops, suggetsing the stage-like quality of our own existence. The reflectivity of the quicksilver-like threads mirrors and objectifies our viewership, magnifying and distorting our presence amidst the cacophony of images and information. The commotion of the woven plants and bugs provide non-hierarchical noise; allowing a space for reverie and contemplation. The artworks on view were created utilizing software programming that randomizes distribution patterns and offers the potential for millions of outcomes. Each of the patterned plants represented in the backdrop tapestries posses psychotropic properties, imagined to be the future of healing and calming the chaos of one’s internal world.

The use of mirrors as an allusion of an alternate, and perhaps, better place is also demonstrated within Pae White’s suspended mobiles. The individual facets mirror the space in shifting perspectives, suggesting that the present could actually be in another place and of another time.

Pae White’s sculptural still-life works pull their forms from a library of digitally-dimensional clip-art meant to exist in the virtual worlds of video games and animations. These forms are not intended to be brought into our world or rendered in a three-dimensional way. Unlike the fantastical temptation of their flattened counterparts, the realized objects appear flawed, withered, and uncomfortable - their integral color feeling “far away”.

Close
Close

TV 70: Francesco Vezzoli guarda la Rai

09 May – 24 September
Mon / Wed / Thu, 10 am-8 pm
Fri / Sat / Sun, 10 am-9 pm

Opening 08 May 7-9 pm

Fondazione Prada Milano
Largo Isarco 2, 20139

View more on Artshell

“TV 70: Franscesco Vezzoli guarda la Rai” is a project by artist Francesco Vezzoli developed in collaboration with Rai, Italy’s national broadcasting company. In between individual experiences and collective narratives, the exhibition translates the artist’s gaze into a visual experience that explores 1970s TV production.

Italian public TV is interpreted by the artist as a driving force for social and political change in a country in transition from the radicalness of the 1960s to the hedonism of the 1980s, as well as a powerful machine for cultural and identity creation. During that decade, Rai revised its pedagogical mission and distinguished itself for the high cultural quality of its productions, such as the collaborations with film directors Bernardo Bertolucci, Federico Fellini, Paolo and Vittorio Taviani. Divided between formal austerity and experimental vocation, 1970s television amplified the development of collective imagination into a plurality of landscapes and individual perspectives, anticipating the narratives which characterized the commercial television of the following decade. TV became a specific medium, and its shows went through a progressive transformation: they first shifted from culture to information, and subsequently from information to communication.

“TV 70” has been conceived as a sequence of visual and semantic juxtapositions taking place in the Nord gallery, in the Podium and in the Sud gallery at Fondazione Prada. The design of the show, realized by M/M (Paris) – Mathias Augustyniak and Michael Amzalag – is based on the merging of spatial and temporal dimensions in a set-up which combines traditional museum exhibition standards with the screening of moving images, in alternating conditions of light and darkness. The sequence of immaterial documents from the Teche Rai archives combined with the materiality of paintings, sculptures and installations – selected thanks to the curatorial support of Cristiana Perrella and the scientific consultancy of Massimo Bernardini and Marco Senaldi – will develop in three separate sections, and analyze the relationships between Italian public television with visual art, politics and entertainment.

Satoshi Fujiwara
EU

07 June – 15 October
Monday – Friday, 2-8 pm
Sat – Sun, 10 am-8 pm

Opening 07 June

Fondazione Prada Osservatorio
Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II 63, 20121

View more on Artshell

EU” is an anthological exhibition by Japanese photographer Satoshi Fujiwara presented at the Osservatorio in the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II in Milan. The show includes some of the most significant works by the artist long with “5K Confinement”, a commission realized for “Belligerent Eyes”, an experimental media research project on image production hosted at Fondazione Prada in Venice in Summer 2016.

Curated by Luigi Alberto Cippini in a set-up conceived by Armature globale, the exhibition offers an alternative to the representational regimes which have set the ground for the current “European photographic identity”. As stated by Cippini, “contemporary photographic production seems to be regulated by strict resolution, impact and distribution standards. An increasing number of freelance reporters daily documents social and political events within and on the edges of the European Union, producing images that, although free from any rigid classification standards, seem to be nonetheless subject to specific aesthetic, accessibility, spatial and content regimes. Such constraints allow and support the work of new generations of photographers, increasing the possibilities for their photos to be published yet contributing to the standardization of an average, neutral taste”.

Satoshi Fujiwara (Kobe, Japan, 1984), initiates a pressing and critical action on the gazer, through the focal length set from portrayed subjects and the heterogeneous definition of his photographs, diverting from the standards of photo-journalism and from an exclusively documentary dimension, thus producing a new emerging lexicon.

The exhibition is divided into two sections: the first, hosted on the lower level of Osservatorio, is a reconstruction of commission “5K Confinement”, whereas the upper floor hosts a retrospective which gathers works from a number of different series, such as “#R”(2015-ongoing), “THE FRIDAY: A report on a report” (2015), “Police Brutality” (2015), “Venus” (2016-ongoing), “Continent” (2017-ongoing), “Animal Material” (2016-ongoing), “Mayday” (2015), “Scanning”(2016) and “Green Helmet (2016).

Alejandro G. Iñárritu
CARNE y ARENA (Virtually Present, Physically Invisible)

07 June – 15 January
Via online booking only
Infos and bookings: www.fondazioneprada.org

Opening 07 June 10am (bookings only)

Fondazione Prada Milano
Largo Isarco 2, 20139

View more on Artshell

Alejandro G. Inarritu’s “CARNE y ARENA (Virtually Present, Physically Invisible),” a virtual reality installation produced by Legendary Entertainment and Fondazione Prada, will be presented in its extensive full version at Fondazione Prada in Milan from 7 June 2017 until 15 January 2018, after its world premiere in the 70th Festival de Cannes.

Based on true accounts, the superficial lines between subject and bystander are blurred and bound together, allowing individuals to walk in a vast space and thoroughly live a fragment of the refugees’ personal journeys. “CARNE y ARENA” employs the highest, never-before- used virtual technology to create a large, multi-narrative light space with human characters.

The experimental visual installation “CARNE y ARENA” is a six and half minute solo experience that reunites frequent collaborators Alejandro G. Inarritu and three-time Academy Award®-winning cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki alongside producer Mary Parent and ILMxLAB.

“During the past four years in which this project has been growing in my mind, I had the privilege of meeting and interviewing many Mexican and Central American refugees. Their life stories haunted me, so I invited some of them to collaborate with me in the project,” said four-time Academy Award-winner Inarritu. “My intention was to experiment with VR technology to explore the human condition in an attempt to break the dictatorship of the frame, within which things are just observed, and claim the space to allow the visitor to go through a direct experience walking in the immigrants’ feet, under their skin, and into their hearts.”

As stated by Germano Celant, Fondazione Prada’s Artistic and Scientific Superintendent, “with ‘CARNE y ARENA’, Inarritu turns the exchange between vision and experience into a process of osmosis in which the duality between the organic body and the artificial body is dissolved. A fusion of identities arises: a psychophysical unity in which, by crossing the threshold of the virtual, the human strays into the imaginary and vice versa. It is a revolution in communication in which seeing is transformed into feeling and into a physical engagement with cinema: a transition from the screen to the gaze of the human being, with a total immersion of the senses. Inarritu’s project perfectly embodies Fondazione Prada’s experimental vocation and its long-lasting engagement towards the correlation between cinema, technology and the arts.”

With the inclusion of “CARNE y ARENA” in the Official Selection, Inarritu continues his longstanding history with the Festival de Cannes, having premiered his first feature film, “Amores Perros,” the Critics Week Grand Prize winner, in 2000 and subsequently presented

“Babel,” for which he won the Best Director Award, in 2006, and “Biutiful” in 2010 as part of the Official Selection. Lubezki’s work has also appeared at Cannes in 2000’s “Things You Can Tell Just by Looking at Her,” which won the Un Certain Regard Prize, and in Terrence Malik’s Palme d’Or-winning “The Tree of Life” in 2011.

Access to the installation will only be available via online booking. More detailed info can be found at the following link: http://www.fondazioneprada.org/project/carne-y-arena

ABOUT LEGENDARY ENTERTAINMENT
Legendary Entertainment is a leading media company with film (Legendary Pictures), television and digital (Legendary Television and Digital Media) and comics (Legendary Comics) divisions dedicated to owning, producing and delivering content to worldwide audiences. Legendary has built a library of marquee media properties and has established itself as a trusted brand which consistently delivers high-quality, commercial entertainment including some of the world's most popular intellectual property.
www.legendary.com

Close
Close

Simon Fujiwara
Heaven

31 May – 30 September
Monday – Friday, 11 am-7 pm
Summer break 31 July – 4 September

Opening 30 May 6-9 pm

Via A. Tadino 20, 20124

View more on Artshell

Heaven

I know not of the reason
Why I’m so sad at heart.
A tale of bygone ages
Haunts me and won’t depart.
 
The air is cool at nightfall
The Rhine courses its way.
The mountain’s peak does sparkle
With evening’s final ray.
 
The fairest of the maidens
So marvelous up there,
Her golden jewels are shining,
She combs her golden hair.
 
And with her comb so golden,
she sings a song as well
Whose melody is binding
And overpowering spell.
 
Now in his boat, the boatman
Is seized with savage woe,
He looks up at the mountain
And shuns the rocks below.
 
So when the waves devour
The boat and man as one;
She sings her final words tonight;
“Fair Lorelei is done”

Adapted from a poem by Heinrich Heine, 1822

Close
Close

Rose Wylie
Yellow Sax

01 June – 09 September
Monday – Friday, 2-7.30 pm
Summer break 1 – 31 August

Opening 31 May From 7pm to 9pm

Via C. Farini 32, 20159

View more on Artshell

Brand New Gallery is pleased to present “Yellow Sax” Rose Wylie’s first solo exhibition in Italy. On view three large-scale paintings: “Black Stork” (2012), as well as two recent works “A Musician From Margate, Seagulls” (2017) and “A Musician From Margate, Shamrock” (2017); that together underscore the artist’s distinctive working process and intuitive approach to image-making. Wylie creates paintings that on first glance appear aesthetically simplistic, not seeming to align with any recognizable style or movement, but on closer inspection are revealed to be wittily observed and subtly sophisticated mediations on the nature of visual representation itself. Rose Wylie finds inspiration from a wide range of visual culture: from film to fashion photography, from literature to mythology, from news images to sports, and from individuals she meets in her day-to-day life. The artist paints colorful and exuberant compositions that are uniquely recognizable. Often working from memory, she distils her subjects into succinct observations, using text to give additional emphasis to her recollections. Rose Wylie’s paintings offer a direct and wry commentary on contemporary culture.

José Lerma
The Last Upper

01 June – 09 September
Monday – Friday, 2-7.30 pm
Summer break 1 – 31 August

Opening 31 May From 7pm to 9pm

Via C. Farini 32, 20159

View more on Artshell

Brand New Gallery is pleased to present “The Last Upper”, José Lerma’s first solo exhibition at the gallery. The show will feature a group of paintings from Lerma’s most recent body of work. Born in Spain in 1971 and raised in Puerto Rico, José Lerma draws inspiration from his personal history, as well as historical figures and events, claiming that “all art is about other art and about your parents”. Lerma explores conceptually and materially the medium of painting, recognizing it as a medium that, historically, has often been a vehicle for commemorating status and power. “Portraiture has traditionally been a way to depicting status... The portraits were idealized, even theatrical… They were instruments. Images serve that function” Power remains a recurrent theme for Lerma, who had a background in social science and he studied law before taking a hard left turn to pursue contemporary high-concept art. Neither critical nor celebratory, Lerma’s approach to his subject matter exposes paradoxes ranging from the site and context to his projects to the medium of painting itself. Using varying methods and alternative materials, Lerma’s gestures and depictions continue to unfold upon investigation, his compositions are at one abstract and figurative, humorous and dark, chaotic and controlled, encouraging a deeper engagement with the content and narrative embedded in the work.

Close
Close

“I Sette Messaggeri”
Arena, Canevari, Di Massimo, Milvio, Sala, Simeti, Vascellari

06 July – 08 September
Monday – Friday, 10 am-6 pm (closed 1-2 pm)
Summer break 7 – 25 August

Opening 05 July 7 pm

Via privata Rezia 2, 20135

View more on Artshell

Curated by Ilaria Marotta e Andrea Baccin

“Gone to explore my father’s kingdom, day after day I’m moving away from the city and the news that get to me are getting rarer. Though leaving light-hearted – far more than I am now! – I was concerned about being able to communicate, during my trip, with my dear ones, and among the knights of my escort I chose the best seven, to serve me as messengers.” Through breaking into the mythical imagination described by Dino Buzzati in the story by the same name, seven messengers offer the spectator a magic land, a mysterious kingdom, a polyphonic stream of past, present and future experiences. Seven Italian artists – Francesco Arena, Paolo Canevari, Patrizio Di Massimo, Daniele Milvio, Andrea Sala, Francesco Simeti, Nico Vascellari – embody the seven characters of a story/exhibition embedded in the narrative cracks of the original story. A reflected and projected image immediately introduces us into a mythical and narrative dimension. Something has certainly already happened. An empty, no longer used sedan chair states so. There is no human presence, only memory. A choir of voices echoes from afar. This is the story of art that recounts itself. It is an amplified oral tradition, which in the mythical world is the only common heritage. The original texts have been lost. A curtain at the back opens and closes. It is beginning and ending. It is paradox. It also highlights the emptiness of images that are reflected, where everything is mixed and muddled. Past and present live in an exotic and suspended dimension. A scorched landscape, a border land. The one on the ground can be walked on. No longer mythical but real. It brings us back to the present. It is the promised land of Lampedusa. A new horizon that tells us about new borders. Oversize shoe soles do not walk on the ground. They tell of an imagination which is fictitious in shape and size and at the same time familiar in color and in matter. And yet, a pictorial, allegorical and perhaps apocalyptic dimension: it is Judith, who takes back Holofernes’s head and thus saves her people. “But more often my doubts arise that this border does not exist, that the kingdom extends beyond limit, and that, as much as I may go ahead, I will never reach its end.” The seven messengers represent the vectors of a spring path which is choral, multi-level, in a never-ending sliding of time and space. They incarnate an emotional state stretched in opposite directions: change, self-knowledge, rooting in one’s own origins. It is what is left of the memory, after forgetting everything. It is the very meaning of culture. The mythical ground now makes room to the real dimension. Human space, pliable, ductile, flexible, unlived story, nostalgia of utopia, identity.

 “There is, I suspect, no frontier, at least not in the sense that we normally think. There are no separation walls, no dividing valleys, nor mountains closing the path. I will probably overcome the limit without even knowing, and keep moving forward, unknowingly.” (Dino Buzzati, I sette messaggeri, in La boutique del mistero, Mondadori, 1942)

Ilaria Marotta and Andrea Baccin are founding directors and curators of BASEMENT ROMA and editors-in-chief of CURA.

Close
Close

Thea Djordjadze, Fausto Melotti
“Jumping out of an age we found uninhabitable”

07 July – 27 August
Tuesday – Sunday
10.30 am - 8.30 pm

Opening 06 July 7 pm

Viale E. Alemagna 6, 20121

View more on Artshell

The result of the encounter between the Georgian artist Thea Djordjadze and the work of Fausto Melotti, the exhibition curated by Lorenzo Giusti with the artistic direction of Edoardo Bonaspetti, brings the dramaturgical principles of meta-theatre onto the visual plane. It plays on the overlapping of time planes and reactivates latent meanings through a dialogue between artists of different generations.

Fascinated by Melotti’s Teatrini – little multi-material “puppet theatres” in which stylised figures mimic encounters and states of mind – Djordjadze has designed a flexible architectural system, both as a support for the works of the great Italian sculptor and as an independent installation. The result is an immersive environment in which architectural elements, load-bearing structures and independent sculptures all relate to each other. A theatre stage for other theatre stages on a small scale, Thea Djordjadze’s work constitutes a meta-scenario in which the subject of the representation is the representation itself.

Thea Djordjadze’s work is always site-specific and the artist is guided by a principle of adaptation that constitutes both her way of working and an aesthetic raison d’être. Her installations consist of assemblages of everyday objects stripped of any functional potential, and of humble materials. This means they are minimal works that have to do with the principles of design and with the tradition of abstract sculpture, yet without really belonging to either of the two categories. The work finds its final form in the exhibition space it is shown in, meaning it is like a living, metamorphic organism, in which the support becomes sculpture and the sculpture support, growing and integrating one into the other.

The display devoted to the Teatrini and, in more general terms, the theme of theatre in Melotti’s work, was thus grafted onto Thea Djordjadze’s installation, like an exhibition within an exhibition. It consists of a selection of twenty-five precious works, with some of the most representative items from the 1940s to the mid-1980s, together with a group of drawings and preparatory studies. The display takes the visitor through the main landmarks of this artistic research, which was long considered minor, hemmed in as it was between the abstractionism of the 1930s and the threadlike structures of the final two decades. These works have since been recognised as some of the finest and most original moments in Melotti’s artistic career.

The outcome of his interest in the metaphysical “scenic place” and of a reflection on Le Corbusier’s studies of the architectural module – which Thea Djordjadze too has always looked at with great interest – the Teatrini are sections of habitable space. They are cells in which the most diverse human situations are staged. Not stories, because the narrative element is reduced to just a few essential elements, but vague sequences, enchanted rooms in a timeless world in which lyrical and dramatic dimensions all coexist.

Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close