Galleries & Museums

Galleries & Museums
5 Galleria Raffaella Cortese
6 Cortesi Gallery
20 Pirelli HangarBicocca
18 Francesca Minini
27 ZERO...
12 kaufmann repetto
8 Massimo De Carlo
21 Fondazione Prada
23 Federica Schiavo Gallery
11 Istituto Svizzero
2 Brand New Gallery
15 Marsèlleria
22 Galleria Lia Rumma
3 Cardi Gallery
7 Galleria Monica De Cardenas
10 Fanta Spazio
1 Armada
14 Gió Marconi
13 Lisson Gallery
16 MEGA
25 La Triennale
26 Fondazione Nicola Trussardi
17 miart
19 Peep-Hole
9 Le Dictateur
24 Tile Project Space
4 Fondazione Carriero
Galleries & Museums
Galleria Raffaella Cortese

,

Open map
Cortesi Gallery

,

Open map
Pirelli HangarBicocca

,

Open map
Pirelli HangarBicocca

,

Open map
Pirelli HangarBicocca

,

Open map
Francesca Minini

,

Open map
ZERO...

Fonderia Artistica Battaglia Via Stilicone 10, 20154

Open map
ZERO...

,

Open map
kaufmann repetto

,

Open map
Massimo De Carlo

Lambrate/Ventura Via G. Ventura 5, 20134

Open map
Massimo De Carlo

Palazzo Belgioioso Piazza Belgioioso 2, 20121

Open map
Fondazione Prada

Fondazione Prada Milano Largo Isarco 2, 20139

Open map
Fondazione Prada

Fondazione Prada Milano Largo Isarco 2, 20139

Open map
Federica Schiavo Gallery

,

Open map
Federica Schiavo Gallery

,

Open map
Istituto Svizzero

,

Open map
Istituto Svizzero

,

Open map
Brand New Gallery

,

Open map
Brand New Gallery

,

Open map
Marsèlleria

Marsèlleria Via Paullo 12/A, 20135

Open map
Marsèlleria

Marsèlleria Via Privata Rezia 2, 20135

Open map
Marsèlleria

Via Privata Rezia, 2, 20135

Open map
Galleria Lia Rumma

,

Open map
Cardi Gallery

,

Open map
Galleria Monica De Cardenas

,

Open map
Fanta Spazio

,

Open map
Armada

,

Open map
Gió Marconi

,

Open map
Lisson Gallery

,

Open map
MEGA

,

Open map
La Triennale

,

Open map
La Triennale

,

Open map
Fondazione Nicola Trussardi

La Triennale di Milano Viale Emilio Alemagna 6, 20121

Open map
Fondazione Carriero

,

Open map
Gió Marconi

Via A. Tadino 20, 20124

Open map
kaufmann repetto

Via di Porta Tenaglia 7, 20121

Open map
Galleria Raffaella Cortese

Via A. Stradella 1, 4, 7, 20129

Open map
Brand New Gallery

Via C. Farini 32, 20159

Open map
Cardi Gallery

Corso di Porta Nuova 38, 20121

Open map
Galleria Monica De Cardenas

Via F. Viganò 4, 20124

Open map
Massimo De Carlo

Via G. Ventura 5 / Palazzo Belgioioso, Piazza Belgioioso 2,

Open map
Pirelli HangarBicocca

Via Chiese 2, 20126

Open map
Istituto Svizzero

Via del Vecchio Politecnico 3, 20121

Open map
Lisson Gallery

Via B. Zenale 3, 20123

Open map
miart

Viale L. Scarampo, 20149

Open map
Francesca Minini

Via Massimiano 25, 20134

Open map
Galleria Lia Rumma

Via Stilicone 19, 20154

Open map
La Triennale

Viale E. Alemagna 6, 20121

Open map
ZERO...

Viale Premuda 46, 20129

Open map
Marsèlleria

Via privata Rezia 2, 20135

Open map
Fondazione Nicola Trussardi

Piazza E. Duse 4, 20122

Open map
Le Dictateur

FutureDome, Via Paisiello 6,

Open map
Fondazione Prada

Largo Isarco 2, 20139 / Osservatorio Fondazione Prada,

Open map
Fondazione Carriero

Via Cino del Duca, 4, 20122

Open map
Fanta Spazio

Via Merano 21, 20127

Open map
Tile Project Space

Via Garian 64, 20146

Open map
Armada

Via Privata Don Bartolomeo Grazioli 73, 20161

Open map
MEGA

Piazza Vetra 21, 20123

Open map
Federica Schiavo Gallery

Via Barozzi 6, 20122

Open map
Cortesi Gallery

Corso di Porta Nuova 46/B, 20121

Open map
10 Corso Como

Corso Como 10 - 20154

Open map
Bar Basso

Via Plinio 39 - 20129

Open map
La Belle Aurore

Via Privata G. Abamonti 1 - 20129

Open map
Fioraio Bianchi Caffè

Via Montebello 7 - 20121

Open map
Carminio

Via Del Carmine 3 - 20121

Open map
Carpaccio

Via L. Palazzi 19 - 20124

Open map
Charmant

Via G. Colombo 42 - 20133

Open map
Grand Hotel et de Milan

Via A. Manzoni 29 - 20121

Open map
Lile in cucina

Via F. Guicciardini 5 - 20129

Open map
Panificio Davide Longoni

Via G. Tiraboschi 19 - 20135

Open map
Pasticceria Marchesi

Via Santa Maria alla Porta 11a - 20123

Open map
Trattoria Masuelli San Marco

Viale Umbria 80 - 20135

Open map
La Nuova Arena

Piazza Lega Lombarda 5 - 20154

Open map
Pavé

Via F. Casati 27 - 20124

Open map
Antica Trattoria della Pesa

Viale Pasubio 10 - 20154

Open map
Picchio

Via Melzo 11 - 20129

Open map
Piero e Pia

Piazza D. Aspari 2 - 20129

Open map
Polpetta DOC

Via B. Eustachi 8 - 20129

Open map
Vivaio Riva

Via Arena 7 - 20123

Open map
Osteria del Treno

Via San Gregorio 46 - 20124

Open map
Violette

Via P. Castaldi 14 - 20124 

Open map
Fonderia Artistica Battaglia

Via Stilicone 10 - 20154

Open map
Mandarin Oriental

Via Andegari 9 - 20121

Open map
Pasticceria Cucchi

Corso Genova 1 - 20123

Open map
Otto

Via Paolo Sarpi 10 - 20154

Open map
DRY Cocktails & Pizza

Via Solferino 33 - 20121

Open map
Capetown Café

Via Vigevano 3 - 20144

Open map
Pisacco

Via Solferino 48 - 20121

Open map
CONVERSO

CLS Architetti - San Paolo Converso Piazza S. Eufemia, Milano - 20122

Open map
Close

Miroslav Balka
"In Bezug auf die Zeit"

04 May – 29 July
Tuesday – Saturday
10 am-7.30 pm (closed 1-3 pm)

Opening 03 May from 7pm to 9pm

Via A. Stradella 1, 4, 7, 20129

View more on Artshell

Galleria Raffaella Cortese is pleased to announce Miroslaw Balka’s fourth show in the gallery’s three exhibition spaces, at a time of great attention towards the Polish artist’s work thank to his first Italian retrospective, curated by Vicente Todoli?, currently on view at Pirelli HangarBicocca, until July 30th.

Miroslaw Balka initiated his artistic research in the Eighties, and immediately began an intimate observation and investigation of the deep meaning of human existence, starting from himself and his own body, placing himself in relation to mankind and its history. The memory of his own experiences, from catholic rituals to family traditions, is intertwined with a highly evocative consciousness, suggestive of an intimate and social path, that tells us of revelations and oblivion, of wounds and healing.

The materials used by Miroslaw Balka, wood, salt, ashes, iron and soap, place themselves in a precarious balance between daily life and rituals, in the same way that his body becomes a critical measure of his works.

The exhibition is conceived as a journey in stages spanning across three decades of Balka’s artistic production, from works created in the 90s to those made specifically for the gallery’s venues.

The title of the show, In Bezug auf die Zeit, in German, is by no chance based on the definition of acceleration in physics, which is the increment of velocity in relation to a time interval. The artist extrapolates only the second part of the definition, which we can translate as “in relation to time”. Through the exhibition’s itinerary we can recognize two fundamental moments in Balka’s research: the transition from figurative to abstract, which characterizes the group of works that will be presented in the gallery’s main exhibition space in via Stradella 7, and the passage from material to gesture which captivates the works presented between the spaces in via Stradella 1 and 4, in a continuos discovery of references. 

Salt, an element which has always been at the foundation of Miroslaw Balka's work as an extremely beautiful material that is also capable of producing pain when it touches an open wound, is always present across the exhibition’s three venues, and becomes the show’s common thread. From Blue Wave (1990), Balka’s first work to employ this material, on view at via Stradella 7 to the work 71 x 65 x 21 exhibited in via Stradella 1, salt becomes a work of art on its own with its materiality, greatness and specificity.

he solo shows dedicated to the artist are: ‘CROSSOVER/S’ at HangarBicocca, Milano, ‘Fragment’ Akademie Der Kunste, Berlin e CCA Warsaw, ‘Between Honey & Ashes’, Douglas Hyde Gallery, Dublin (2011), Museo Reina Sofia, Madrid (2010), Modern Art Oxford, Oxford and Tate Modern, London (2009) Museum of Contemporary Art, Rijeka and Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin (2007), K21 Kunstsammlung Nordrhein Westfalen, Du?sseldorf (2006), Museum of Contemporary Art, Strasbourg (2004), Kroller - Muller Museum, Otterlo (2001) Dundee Contemporary Arts, Scotland (2002) and Stedelijk Museum voor Actuelle Kunst (SMAK), Gent (2001).

Balka has also taken place in a number of group shows, such as: ‘Building Memory’ CCA, Tel Aviv, HMKV, Dortmund and Museum Stzuki, Lodz (2010) e Contemporary Art Centre, Vilinius (2009) SITE Santa Fe 6th Biennale, New Mexico (2006) the Sydney Biennale (2006), Venice Biennale (2005, 1993 and 1990) and Documenta IX (1992).

Close
Close

Nicola De Maria
From the Venice Biennale 1990

04 May – 21 July
Monday-Friday 10.30 am-7 pm
Saturday 12-6 pm

Opening 03 May from 6pm to 8.30pm

Corso di Porta Nuova 46/B, 20121

View more on Artshell

Ahead of the opening of the 57th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia, Cortesi Gallery is delighted to announce the launch of a new space in Milan, with an exhibition dedicated to Italian Transavanguardia artist, Nicola De Maria. The show brings together the five monumental canvases created by De Maria on the occasion of his participation at the Venice Biennale in 1990, and pays tribute to the biennial and the artists who took part in it over the years. Milan is the third location of Cortesi Gallery. Founder and director Stefano Cortesi, together with his sons Andrea and Lorenzo, opened the first branch in Lugano in 2013, followed by a gallery in London in 2015.

“The decision to open in Milan draws on the necessity of meeting Italian collectors’ needs and tap into the ever-expanding international audience, attracted to the city by its wide offering of popular events and the growing number of museums and private foundations,” said Andrea and Lorenzo Cortesi. “For us, it is an important return and homage to our Milanese roots and the new 350-square-metre space will offer unprecedented possibilities in terms of display”.

Since its inaugural exhibition in Lugano, Italian Art ‘60-’90, which presented works by modern masters such as Agostino Bonalumi, Enrico Castellani and Lucio Fontana - Cortesi Gallery has always developed its programme with input from art experts, curators and institutions, in Italy and abroad (Zero Foundation, Museum of Contemporary Art in Zagreb, Paolo Scheggi Archive, Agostino Bonalumi Archive, Raccolta Lercaro, to name a few). Cortesi Gallery also presented the first UK retrospectives of Grazia Varisco and Gianfranco Pardi, as well as of Croatian artist, Ivan Picelj.

“I have decided to turn my passion for art into a business”, stated founder and director Stefano Cortesi, who comes from a background in finance. “I feel confident to say that we left a very positive mark in the art scene in terms of research, quality of exhibitions and presence at fairs. Initially, we decided to focus solely on the most historicised post- war period, from the 1950s to the 1960s, which is also a time of great innovation in art. Over the past years, this particular sector has recorded a strong market interest, allowing us to exhibit well-known artists, as well as doing research on other artists like Paolo Scheggi – who at the time we started showing his pieces, lacked due recognition – and we have contributed to their rise in value. As a gallery, we reached a remarkable visibility very quickly: now, having opened an outpost in London and consolidated our position on the European scene, we decided to turn to Milan, and in doing so we chose to expand further our exhibition offering. We have always focused on artists who have pursued an optical, kinetic and geometric theme, now we want to look at painting and colour. Over the years, we have noticed a loss of interest in the exponents of Transavanguardia from the market and some dealers who followed their careers and promoted them in the 80s and 90s. We strongly believe in the quality of their work and we will endeavor to give adequate visibility to artists of this movement.”

Nicola De Maria is one of the protagonists of the Italian Transavanguardia, a movement defined in the mid-70s by art historian and critic Achille Bonito Oliva. An expression of transition, the Transavanguardia abandoned the avant-gardes’ positivism and certainties in favour of cultural nomadism, stylistic eclecticism and a rehabilitation of painting and manners, both abstract and figurative, freely condensed in the same work.

In 1990, De Maria was invited for the third time to participate in the Venice Biennale, and exhibited at the Italian Pavilion alongside Giovanni Anselmo, Alighiero Boetti, Dadamaino, Gino De Dominicis, Alberto Garutti, Giuseppe Maraniello, Carlo Maria Mariani, Vettor Pisani and others.

The curators, Laura Cherubini, Flaminio Gualdoni and Lea Vergine, assigned one entire room to each of the artists: in his, De Maria realised an immersive intervention, where flat fields of colour drowned the walls of his room in yellow, red, blue, orange, violet and green, and on which he installed the five large-scale canvases on view at Cortesi Gallery in Milan. The Teste Orfiche (as the artists titled them, numbering them from I to V) are each 3-metres in height and some measure over 5-metres in width. The works recall geometric shapes, natural landscapes, imagined starry skies and, at the same time, the visual suggestions of a musical score. With their chromatic ‘violence’, these pieces involve and encompass the viewer in an endless space of colour. They thrive on a peculiar light that comes from within, rather than form the outside, an effect achieved by De Maria through his use of natural pigments in a return to the primal techniques of painting.

At the exhibition in Milan, these five large canvases will be displayed with smaller scale historical works, as they were at the 1990 Venice Biennale, and again at the re-showing of the display at the Centro per l'Arte Contemporanea Luigi Pecci in 2012.

Close
Close

Osgemeos “Efêmero”
curated by Cedar Lewisohn

21 April – 23 April
Thursday – Sunday
10 am-10 pm

Opening 20 April

Via Chiese 2, 20126

View more on Artshell

Pirelli HangarBicocca presents the new public mural, Efêmero, the first large-scale mural in Italy by OSGEMEOS, who are among the world’s most renowned contemporary artists. This work on the outer walls of Pirelli HangarBicocca, to be inaugurated on April 20, 2016, is part of the new three-year project “Outside the Cube," which will involve innovative new approaches to art in public space and a rich calendar of parallel events. The industrial site of Pirelli HangarBicocca, where in the last century trains were made, will become the ideal setting for the work of OSGEMEOS and the many artists to follow.

The project at Pirelli HangarBicocca will delve deeper into the artist’s unique universe of mysterious symbolism and alternative realities. OSGEMEOS’s works often huge in scale, matched with its distinctive patterns and colour schemes, referencing the natural world and improvisation of Sao Paulo. The project will explore the history and spectacular architectural setting of Pirelli HangarBicocca, using the site as a starting point for an iconic new production. The mural will not only be painted on the buildings facade but be incorporated into the buildings architecture. This is an ongoing theme in the artists work, to create murals that transform the facade of a building into a new structure. The project will be accompanied by a limited edition catalogue designed by the artists. The book will explore further the artists history of architectural interventions and include images of their works that have repurposed the built environment.

Curated by artist and writer Cedar Lewisohn - who has authored many publications on art, and curated the exhibition “Street Art at Tate Modern” in 2008 - the project by OSGEMEOS will occupy the two outer walls of Pirelli HangarBicocca’s Cubo space, covering a total area of a thousand square meters. It will also be visible from the nearby train tracks and from the street.

OSGEMEOS, literally meaning “the twins,” is the pseudonym of Brazilian twin brothers Gustavo and Otavio Pandolfo (b. 1974 in Sao Paulo). This artistic duo, whose roots are in hip-hop culture and graffiti, began in the 1980s to develop a highly sophisticated oeuvre recognizable for its dreamlike landscapes and poetic figures, drawing on a vast range of cultural, social and political references.

Miroslaw Balka "CROSSOVER/S"
Curated by Vicente Todolí

16 March – 30 July
Thursday – Sunday
10 am-10 pm

Opening 15 March 7 pm

Via Chiese 2, 20126

View more on Artshell

Pirelli HangarBicocca presents “CROSSOVER/S,” the first retrospective in Italy by Miroslaw Balka, one of the leading artists of the last three decades, whose work explores human life, human nature, and individual and collective memory. Reflecting on the history of Europe and especially of Poland, his birthplace and home, Balka draws on autobiographical elements and episodes to create works that address universal themes in a powerfully evocative way.

The exhibition, curated by Vicente Todoli?, brings together fifteen iconic sculptures, installations, and videos made from the 1990s to the present, along with a new project, Holding the Horizon (2016), a video conceived specifically for the show at Pirelli HangarBicocca.

The artistic career of Miroslaw Balka (b. 1958 in Warsaw) began in the mid-1980s, with figurative sculptures connected to his own life story and to the historical and political context of post-war Poland. In the early 1990s, Balka abandoned anthropomorphic forms to concentrate on depicting symbolic objects like beds, pedestals and fountains, in works that allude to the human presence without ever portraying it. Frequently based on ordinary materials like wood, salt, ashes, soap, cement and steel, they often employ the dimensions of the artist’s own body as a unit of measurement, as the titles make clear. This creates a proportional relationship directly linking the human figure to space, vision, experience, and memory.

“CROSSOVER/S,” conceived for the Navate space at Pirelli HangarBicocca, is meant to focus public attention on this later period in Balka’s artistic investigation and oeuvre, through an immersive exhibition full of physical, symbolic, and temporal intersections, where even light and darkness take on a key role and where viewers are made aware of their own presence and function within the space. In the artist’s words, “It is important to remind the visitor that they are not only eyes, but also the body that walked in the space” (Miroslaw Balka, in Dylan Kerr, “Sculptor Miroslaw Balka on the Romance of Conceptual Art,” Artspace, 2015).

The exhibition both starts and ends with a symbolic horizon that draws the viewer’s gaze into its depths. Over the door that serves as both the entrance and exit of the Navate, Balka has chosen to place a LED screen with the video Holding the Horizon (2016), which which shows the unstable image of a yellow line. After moving through the space, visitors see the work once again on their way out. The show is thus conceived as a circular route that brings out new aspects and connotations in the works on view.

At the heart of the exhibition is Cruzamento (2007), a cross-shaped structure made out of wire cage, incorporating five fans. In this installation, Balka reflects on the concepts of transit and passage, creating a junction in the center of the Navate that becomes a threshold visitors must cross to continue on their way. The downward blast of air from the fans means they must make an additional effort to move through it. The same idea crops up elsewhere in “CROSSOVER/S,” with works like 200 x 760 x 550 The Right Path (2008/2015), a dark metal corridor visitors are invited to walk down, which seems to lead somewhere outside the exhibition space.

In the Cubo space, after entering through a narrow doorway, they find Yellow Nerve (2012/2015), an almost imperceptible work that emphasizes the vast dimensions of the space, playing on its height: a thin, slowly twisting yellow thread hangs down from ceiling to floor. Placed at the far end of the exhibition, this vertical line seems to connect with the horizontal line in Holding the Horizon at the beginning, yielding a metaphorical intersection between different planes.

The artist has designed the show to engage visitors not just through their eyes or intellect, but through their bodily dimensions and all other modes of perception. Balka has therefore placed the works on every surface of the Navate—the floor, walls, and ceiling—and stimulates our senses of hearing, touch, and smell. Hence the videos projected on the ground, the endless echo of black-tinted water that trickles over metal in the looming fountain of Wege zur Behandlung von Schmerzen (2011), or the intense smell that wafts from Soap Corridor (1995)—a work first conceived for the 1993 Venice Biennale—lead visitors to focus on their movement through the space and their presence within it.

Balka analyzes how individuals perceive the space around them, and explores human experience through constant spatial and sensory intersections and contrasts, along a path that reveals the symbolic significance of his works. Springing at times from personal recollections, they constantly summon up an intimate, domestic dimension, as in Common Ground (2013/2016), an installation of doormats collected from houses on a street in Krakow, through which the artist reflects on the concept of entrances and thresholds, and on the privacy of the home, or a collective dimension—like in 7 x 7 x 1010 (2000), a column made from bars of soap evoking the memory of unknown people from Warsaw who used them.

In “CROSSOVER/S,” these individual motifs are also interwoven with references to recent Polish history, and to the collective memory of dramatic events from the past that are still vivid in the present, like World War II and the Holocaust: BlueGasEyes (2004), a video installation in which the image of two gas burners is projected on a layer of salt on the floor, evokes the image of the domestic hearth, but also suggests possibilities of violence; while in the installation 250 x 700 x 455, ø 41 x 41/Zoo/T (2007/2008), the playful connotations of the zoo in the title give way to a dramatic flashblack of the one built in the Treblinka camp for the entertainment of the guards.

Contemporary time does not exist, we cannot catch the continuous. As we move ever into the future we are always based in the past. This is the state of my sculpture [...] Everything we touch is coming from the past, it’s our access to death. For me the important thing in my art is to try to catch that consciousness of life. (in Frances Morris, “Dawn,” exhibition guide, Tate Gallery 1995-1996).

In the exhibition at Pirelli HangarBicocca, past and present constantly intersect, mapping out a journey through time where personal memories and myths are tied to the collective ones of a population, shedding light on complex historical dynamics still difficult to face.

Rosa Barba "From Source to Poem to Rhythm to Reader"
Curated by Roberta Tenconi

05 May – 08 October
Thursday – Sunday
10 am-10 pm

Opening 04 May 7 pm-midnight

Via Chiese 2, 20126

View more on Artshell

From May 5 to October 8, 2017, Pirelli HangarBicocca presents Rosa Barba’s solo exhibition “From Source to Poem to Rhythm to Reader,” curated by Roberta Tenconi: a project that brings together fourteen works made since 2009, including 35mm and 16mm films, kinetic sculptures, and site-specific pieces.

Barba’s exhibition “From Source to Poem to Rhythm to Reader,” hosted in the Shed space at Pirelli HangarBicocca, weaves an intense dialogue between the works on view and the industrial setting that houses them. The five films in the show, seen here for the first time in Italy, include The Empirical Effect (2009), an exploration of the landscape around Vesuvius as a web of natural, mental, and cultural forces, and the artist's two most recent works: Enigmatic Whisper (2017), shot in the studio of artist Alexander Calder, and From Source to Poem (2016), a densely layered audio-visual narration, increasingly overlapping and condensing, analogous to white noise, filmed in the Audio-Visual Conservation Center of the Library of Congress in Culpeper, Virginia, the world’s largest multimedia archive.

Rosa Barba (b. 1972 in Agrigento, Italy, based in Berlin), whose work has won many awards and been featured at international exhibitions and festivals, has chosen film as her primary tool of expression. For years, Barba has experimented with the language of cinema and sculpture, reflecting on the poetic qualities of the natural and human landscape, exploring the idea of place as a vessel of memory, and dismantling the notion of linear time. Powerfully striking images, portraits of obsolete architecture and natural landscapes, and visions of remote deserts turn up throughout her works, combined with fragments of text and scenarios where past and present intertwine.

“What I try to express in my films is that time is based on individual and smaller collective histories and is a very malleable and flexible phenomenon. In my films there are usually different time scales running parallel. My perspective as an observer is non-judgmental. I assume reality is a fiction that is based on individual interpretations of real events. My movies mostly play with the idea that they could happen in the future as well as in the past and are trying to manifest as a utopian solution.

(Rosa Barba in conversation with Mirjam Varadinis and Solveig Øvstebø, in Time as Perspective, Ostfildern: Hatje Cantz, 2013)

The Exhibition

The 35mm film From Source to Poem (2016), co-produced by Pirelli HangarBicocca and CAPC muse?e d’art contemporain de Bordeaux, France, with the participation of Tabakalera, Donostia, Spain, is shot in Culpeper, Virginia at the Packard Campus for Audio-Visual Conservation, part of the Library of Congress: more than 90 miles of shelves that hold a collection of over four million items, both moving-image (films, videos, television episodes) and audio recordings (music, spoken word, radio broadcasts) in obsolete formats as well as modern digital files. Following on a previous trilogy titled The Hidden Conference (2010- 15)—a project where Barba’s camera explores the storage areas of the Neue Nationalgalerie in Berlin, the Capitoline Museums in Rome, and Tate Modern in London—this new film juxtaposes voices speaking different languages with written text and words, mingling images from the Packard Campus with others shot in the desert, a place the artist considers a vast expanse of memory and an archive in its own right.

Along with desert scenes, Barba often shows us abandoned human landscapes, which have become the wreckage of a past era, places that take on a mysterious significance in our time. For instance, her film Subconscious Society, a Feature (2014) describes the end of the industrial age, alternating between a future “the present” in which protagonists are set in a type of memory theater, an evocative, moldering space, and the past “future”, set in powerful images of the bereft objects and buildings of industrial sites.

Personal histories and events are often the starting point for narratives that walk the line between experimental documentary and science fiction, where it is hard to tell memory from make-believe. The protagonists of The Empirical Effect (2009) are residents of the "red zone” around Vesuvius who survived the volcano’s last eruption in 1944. Blurring together different levels of narration, this film set around Vesuvius—for Rosa Barba a metaphor for the complex relationships between society and politics in Italy—stages an evacuation drill that has never been held.

In Rosa Barba’s practice, personal contact with the people who are tied to a given place is combined with a long, painstaking process of research and investigation. For Enigmatic Whisper (2017), her camera gained access to the studio of American sculptor Alexander Calder (1898-1976) in Roxbury, Connecticut, which has remained untouched since his death in 1976. Barba’s film offers a portrait of one of his sculptures, which has borne witness over many years to the joyful creative universe of this great figure in twentieth-century art history.

Rosa Barba’s work ultimately extends into a conceptual practice where the medium of film is employed to explore any possible aspect of its material, sculptural, and narrative qualities and the ways itarticulates space. Rolls of film or 16mm projectors often become compositional elements in kinetic sculptures that project sequences of colored light, focusing attention on the idea of movement and rhythm.

In The Long Poem Manipulates Spatial Organizations (2014), for instance, the projector is tilted 45 degrees to create a distorted image in which cut-out letters unfold across the screen like the notes of a score.

Whilst in Hear, There, Where the Echoes Are (2016), beams of light and color pour into the space and over visitors through a kinetic installation of sound and light, with five projectors synchronized to the rhythm of a drum score, showing a more performative aspect of Rosa Barba’s work.

On the occasion of the exhibition “From Source to Poem to Rhythm to Reader,” from summer 2017 a catalog titled From Source to Poem will be available with contributions by Rosa Barba, Manuel Borja-Villel, Giuliana Bruno, Joan Jonas, E?lisabeth Lebovici and Roberta Tenconi. The publication is bilingual, Italian and English, and published by Hatje Canz and Pirelli HangarBicocca.

Close
Close

Mandla Reuter

08 May – 29 July
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am-7.00 pm

Opening 07 May 11 am-8 pm

Via Massimiano 25, 20134

View more on Artshell

Francesca Minini is pleased to announce Mandla Reuter’s third solo exhibition at the gallery.

Point of origin of Mandla Reuter’s work in recent years often was a piece of land on a paper street near downtown Los Angeles. Purchased for the exhibition, A Plot, at De Vleeshal in Middelburg, Netherlands in 2010, Reuter has regularly drawn from this empty lot as a fount of source material. While sitting vacant in East L.A. with an occupiable area of around 400 square meter the site served him as a studio of endless dimensions unlimited by geography.

Similar to Gordon Matta Clark’s anarchitecture, this piece of land exists only through the translation the artist provides through his works. Lately Reuter’s approach broadened up to other parts in the world like e.g. Iquitos, Peru, Buenos Aires, Argentina or, most recently, a block of white marble in a 20ft sea-container traveling on a ship between Thasos, Greece and Los Angeles, USA.

Reuter’s exhibition at Francesca Minini consists of a combination of works, which emerged from this artistic research. Departing from the question on how the world today is explored and viewed at Reuter, is showing a body of work circling around the matter of urbanization and nature.

The Grid (2015) is an installation made of 1.000 liters of table water and an altered manhole cover made of cast iron, which the artist exported from the city Iquitos. With this work Reuter is interweaving the plot of land in Los Angeles with a city in the Peruvian rainforest. Although located in the middle of the continent in the Northern Amazon basin close to the borders of Colombia and Brazil, Iquitos has the character of an island, only reachable by boat or plane. The work is a portrait of a city, an image consisting of essential infrastructural elements of most larger settlements, sewage system and water supply.

Another work in the exhibition, titled Atlantis (2016) in reference to the fictional island which falls out of favor with the Greek gods and is submerged and lost in the Atlantic Ocean, consists of an inflatable lift bag. Also known as salvage balloons, these objects are primarily used by archeologists and submarine salvage teams in order to transport material from the ocean ground back to the surface. This is often man-made material, which has encountered ill-fate or has been lost at sea. Poetically the function of the bag is to return to the light, which was hidden and often forgotten. The artist’s version liberates the lift bag from its intended use lending it the appearance of a beached whale. Atlantis aims to salvage ideas of history making them legible at the surface, at the same time to reflect upon the past in conjunction with the present.

Close
Close

"The act of drinking a Coke by yourself is the lowest form of art"

01 April – 20 May
Thursday – Saturday
3-7 pm

Opening 31 March From 6pm to 9pm

Fonderia Artistica Battaglia
Via Stilicone 10, 20154

View more on Artshell

Can drinking a Coke be a poetic gesture? I am not so interested in the symbolic and political value of the Coca-Cola Company. I am more interested in the pleasant and refreshing taste of its bubbles in my mouth. A little pleasure, at times almost metaphysical. A Proustian element in contemporaneity, indeed. Driven by the faith in men’s capability of emancipating from a strictly naturalistic vision. Like imagining a form of salvation in being slightly out of time. The lowest form of art. 

A group exhibition with Micol Assaël, Neïl Beloufa, Cezary Bodzianowski, Adam Gordon, João Maria Gusmão + Pedro Paiva, Gavin Kenyon, Victor Man, Loïc Raguénès, Pietro Roccasalva, Michael Sailstorfer, Hans Schabus, Cally Spooner

João Maria Gusmão + Pedro Paiva
“Avantesma Fantasma and a b&w ghost show”

08 May – 15 July
Monday, 3-7 pm
Tuesday – Friday, 11 am-7 pm (closed 1.30-2.30 pm)

Opening 07 May From 11am to 8pm

Viale Premuda 46, 20129

View more on Artshell

Close
Close

Pae White
Demimondaine

09 May – 09 September
Tuesday – Saturday (Monday by appointment)
11 am-7.30 pm

Opening 08 May official opening from 6pm; Open also on 7 May

Via di Porta Tenaglia 7, 20121

View more on Artshell

kaufmann repetto is pleased to present Demimondaine, Pae White’s sixth solo exhibition with the gallery.

The exhibition title lends itself to the French “demi-monde” or “half-world”, a popular phrase at the turn of the early twentieth century characterizing those living opulent, pleasure-driven lifestyles. The derivative “demimondaine” spoke of the women that lived on the fringe of respectable society, straddling the standards of the “real-world”. Their way of life a challenge of the status quo but existing within the confines of those very ideals - a controlled excess, a chaos within boundaries.

Pae White’s work utilizes both the most advanced technology and skilled artisans to emphasize the simultaneous limitations and intricacies of each and to contort the connotations of the functional versus the decorative. White’s monumental new, digitally woven tapestries are the scale of backdrops, suggetsing the stage-like quality of our own existence. The reflectivity of the quicksilver-like threads mirrors and objectifies our viewership, magnifying and distorting our presence amidst the cacophony of images and information. The commotion of the woven plants and bugs provide non-hierarchical noise; allowing a space for reverie and contemplation. The artworks on view were created utilizing software programming that randomizes distribution patterns and offers the potential for millions of outcomes. Each of the patterned plants represented in the backdrop tapestries posses psychotropic properties, imagined to be the future of healing and calming the chaos of one’s internal world.

The use of mirrors as an allusion of an alternate, and perhaps, better place is also demonstrated within Pae White’s suspended mobiles. The individual facets mirror the space in shifting perspectives, suggesting that the present could actually be in another place and of another time.

Pae White’s sculptural still-life works pull their forms from a library of digitally-dimensional clip-art meant to exist in the virtual worlds of video games and animations. These forms are not intended to be brought into our world or rendered in a three-dimensional way. Unlike the fantastical temptation of their flattened counterparts, the realized objects appear flawed, withered, and uncomfortable - their integral color feeling “far away”.

Close
Close

Andra Ursuţa
THE MAN FROM THE INTERNET

09 May – 14 July
Tuesday – Saturday
11.30 am-7 pm

Opening 08 May official opening from 6pm to 9pm; Open also on 7 May

Lambrate/Ventura
Via G. Ventura 5, 20134

View more on Artshell

Dan Colen
PURGATORY PAINTINGS

09 May – 14 July
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am-7 pm

Opening 08 May official opening from 6pm to 9pm; Open also on 7 May

Palazzo Belgioioso
Piazza Belgioioso 2, 20121

View more on Artshell

Massimo De Carlo is pleased to present Purgatory Paintings, a new exhibition by the American artist Dan Colen. The exhibition, which will take place in the Milan gallery in Piazza Belgioioso, will open to the public on the 9th of May 2017.

Throughout his practice Dan Colen has used the canvas as the medium to investigate the transcendental value of banality, encompassing fairy-tales and found objects to draft a narrative that elevates materiality itself by shifting between non-representational subjects and figurative ones.

The Purgatory Paintings are a continuation of the artist’s pursuit of placing art between the worlds of abstraction and representation. Each canvas, seen from a distance, looks like cloudscapes, however, as one’s body enters the close physical space of the canvas, the subject matter dissolves into a fog of formlessness and colour.

A skilful and thorough labour process is involved in the making of the Purgatory Paintings, where the end result is a painting comprised of myriad translucent layers – none of which reveal any hard edges or brushwork. Instead, paint in the Purgatory series behaves in much the same manner that clouds do themselves: a suspension of liquid aerosols so finely scattered as to appear like a formless gas one must squint to perceive.

The notion of purgatory can be applied to the paintings themselves, which are caught in the midst of an investigation of the painterly gesture, and to the subjects of the works: looking at the clouds in the paintings it is impossible to know whether a storm is breaking apart or just setting in, whether the sun is on its way up, or on its way down. Both time and space, then, are unresolvable, and the resulting works appropriately conflate nothingness with the infinite. Foregrounded shapes stand in stark contrast to a deeper atmosphere, confusing the gradations in between. Like Purgatory itself, one cannot perceive the distance out or discern whether there is no middle ground or only middle ground.

The exhibition, that marks Dan Colen’s return to Italy after six years, offers an insight into the way that we now experience nature and consciousness through hastily defined, synthetic filters allowing theatrical and cartoonish fantasy to become an ideal platform on which to stage the contemporary sublime.

Close
Close

Slight Agitation 2/4: Pamela Rosenkranz

09 February – 14 May
Sun / Mon / Wed / Thu: 10am-7pm
Fri / Sat: 10am-8pm

Opening 08 February from 7pm to 9pm

Fondazione Prada Milano
Largo Isarco 2, 20139

View more on Artshell

Curated by the Fondazione Prada Thought Council, whose current members are Shumon Basar, Cédric Libert, Elvira Dyangani Ose, and Dieter Roelstraete, “Slight Agitation” continues with a second instalment by Pamela Rosenkranz (Switzerland, 1979). She follows on from Tobias Putrih (Slovenia, 1972), while Laura Lima (Brazil, 1971) and Gelitin, the Austrian collective active since 1993, will produce future chapters.

Pamela Rosenkranz’s work explores how physical and biological processes affect art. Her installation Infection is based on a neuro-active parasite, of which an estimated 30% of the world’s population is affected. A huge, almost sublime mountain of sand is formed inside the Cisterna’s tall spaces. Its scale pressuring against the historic architecture. The sand is impregnated with fragrance of synthetic cat pheromones that activates a specific, biologically determined attraction or repulsion and subconsciously influence the public’s movement. RGB green light illuminates the peak of this chemically altered nature gently evaporating the scent.

Following Tobias Putrih’s instalment—which engaged with ideas of play, politics and emancipation—Pamela Rosenkranz’s chapter continues the Thought Council’s interest in “agitating” the mind and body, senses and space. Rosenkranz’s intervention will be perceived at different distances, which heighten and alter the architecture of the Cisterna. The circular plan, and chemical investigation, is an oblique memory of the Cisterna’s alcohol distilling vats that were formerly housed there. The green light leaking through the Cisterna’s windows, transforms the building into a vitrine, a luminous object sensed from the outside.
It will intensify as day turns to night, engaging with the Fondazione’s nocturnal character. Members of the public will have a direct, intimate experience of the sculptural intervention from a number of angles: at ground level and also from above, emphasizing the formal qualities of the Cisterna: its volume, its heaviness, its religious invocation.
An uneasy feeling around biological determination will engage multiple senses: smell, heat and coldness, mass and density, light and its absence. Pamela Rosenkranz’s intervention furthers the ambitions of “Slight Agitation” by offering immersion into a new sensation of embodiment and collectivity.

TV 70: Francesco Vezzoli guarda la Rai

09 May – 24 September
Sun / Mon / Wed / Thu: 10am-7pm
Fri / Sat: 10am-8pm

Opening 08 May 7-9 pm

Fondazione Prada Milano
Largo Isarco 2, 20139

View more on Artshell

“TV 70: Franscesco Vezzoli guarda la Rai” is a project by artist Francesco Vezzoli developed in collaboration with Rai, Italy’s national broadcasting company. In between individual experiences and collective narratives, the exhibition translates the artist’s gaze into a visual experience that explores 1970s TV production.

Italian public TV is interpreted by the artist as a driving force for social and political change in a country in transition from the radicalness of the 1960s to the hedonism of the 1980s, as well as a powerful machine for cultural and identity creation. During that decade, Rai revised its pedagogical mission and distinguished itself for the high cultural quality of its productions, such as the collaborations with film directors Bernardo Bertolucci, Federico Fellini, Paolo and Vittorio Taviani. Divided between formal austerity and experimental vocation, 1970s television amplified the development of collective imagination into a plurality of landscapes and individual perspectives, anticipating the narratives which characterized the commercial television of the following decade. TV became a specific medium, and its shows went through a progressive transformation: they first shifted from culture to information, and subsequently from information to communication.

“TV 70” has been conceived as a sequence of visual and semantic juxtapositions taking place in the Nord gallery, in the Podium and in the Sud gallery at Fondazione Prada. The design of the show, realized by M/M (Paris) – Mathias Augustyniak and Michael Amzalag – is based on the merging of spatial and temporal dimensions in a set-up which combines traditional museum exhibition standards with the screening of moving images, in alternating conditions of light and darkness. The sequence of immaterial documents from the Teche Rai archives combined with the materiality of paintings, sculptures and installations – selected thanks to the curatorial support of Cristiana Perrella and the scientific consultancy of Massimo Bernardini and Marco Senaldi – will develop in three separate sections, and analyze the relationships between Italian public television with visual art, politics and entertainment.

Close
Close

Andrea Sala
"The Phantom of the Anvil"

23 March – 11 May
Tuesday – Friday, 11-7 pm
Saturday, 12-7pm

Opening 22 March 6-9 pm

Via Barozzi 6, 20122

View more on Artshell

Building hammers to cast iron. Drawing tools’ shapes for a precise purpose, strictly related to the physical effort involved in their use; heavy tools and flat sides to hit with maximum strength, small rounded heads to hit in repetition curved metallic bits still incandescent. Andrea Sala is imagining the history of the objects that began with the same tools used to construct these objects. “Any constructed form will never be beautiful if the tool used to forge it is not as beautiful”. Sala is fascinated by forms and the domino-like nature of the production chain where it’s almost impossible to guess the beginning: to closely observe a tool, built and modelled so that it can be used to forge something else again used to assemble another object and yet another, without possibly seeing the end of the process. [...] The shape of hammers and anvils – place of ancient sounds, movements, stokes and bangs – it is the artisanal mould of countless objects, the origin of thousands of geometries.

Andrea Sala (Como, 1976) – has worked between Milan and Montreal – investigates the world of manufactured goods, the world of architecture and the true nature of materials in such a manner only a true sculptor could do. At Federica Schiavo Gallery with a new series of work and in bookstores with a new artist-book “Tachipirina”, RAWRAW editions, curated by Davide Giannella, the Italian artist meticulously dissects the world of objects. His hands moulding details, splinters of reality or hidden corners that, in Sala’s story summarize in a small fragment the more extended tale of a scene. [...] When looked at closely, explored as it develops, the construction process of an object is a tale on its own, made of parts to be joined, both enigmatic and self- evident, obvious like the history of our materialistic culture. Intimate, mechanical and handcrafted, Sala’s work comes to life from a gigantic, limitless canvas. Surrounded by the metallic sound of hand-made hammers.

(Extract from the text by Francesco Garutti for “ICON Design” - January 2017)

Salvatore Arancio
And These Crystals Are Just like Globes of Light

19 May – 15 July
Tuesday - Friday, 11 am - 7 pm
Saturday, 12 pm - 7 pm

Opening 18 May from 6pm

Via Barozzi 6, 20122

View more on Artshell

Federica Schiavo Gallery is pleased to present And These Crystals Are Just like Globes of Light, the third solo show by Salvatore Arancio at the gallery.

The artist’s aim, through the use of a range of media such as ceramics, collage, prints and video, is to give the sensation of a compact and homogeneous concept regardless of the fact that his practice is paradoxically composed of contrasting elements. Each facet of his practice contains an intertwining juxtaposition of the roots and representation of images: natural and artificial, mineral and vegetable, two-dimensional and three-dimensional, scientific and mythological. Departing from their literal meaning, Arancio creates new juxtapositions that are both beautifully evocative and deeply disquieting.

The display of the first room revolves around a sculptural installation designed and produced by the artist for the Kunsthalle Winterthur in 2016. The leitmotif for this part of the exhibition is the fictional reading of the Cave of Giant Crystals (Cueva de los Cristales), the caverns located below the Naica Mine in Mexico, where there are the biggest natural crystals known on Earth. The cave inspired Arancio to an installation of individual ceramic works arranged on black resin surfaces and titled And These Crystals Are Just like Globes of Light.

While the Cave Of Giant Crystals became the source of inspiration for the works in the first room, in the next one the sculptural pieces are shaped by forms informed by the petrified trees of the “Lava Trees State Park” in the Hawaii Island, that preserves lava moulds of the tree trunks that were formed after a volcanic eruption in 1790. By using a natural material like clay to recreate the lava trees’ totemic presence and by toning the resulting shapes with iridescent, metallic glazes, the artist’s aim is to create a link to his on going fascination about nature as a theatre for rituals, worships and self-induced trance states.

The sculptures in the second room have been produced in 2017 in collaboration with the ancient Ceramica Gatti in Faenza together with the project for La Biennale di Venezia 2017.

In all the sculptures in the show, Arancio doesn’t hesitate to convene science and make apparent their mystical side decontextualizing the forms that have inspired him and emphasize the strangeness and the evocative power of these natural elements that may recall phallic symbols and esoteric signs. A “strange temporality” will emerge by visiting the show, where you’re not exactly sure where you might be, or when.

 

Close
Close

REINFORCE EXPOSE
The Inner Forms of Tomorrow by Gramazio Kohler Research

05 April – 06 May
5-8 April: 11 am-8 pm / 9 April: 11 am-6 pm
Monday – Friday, 10.30 am-5.30 pm Saturday, 2-6 pm

Opening 04 April 6.30 pm

Via del Vecchio Politecnico 3, 20121

View more on Artshell

Mostra in occasione del Salone del Mobile
 

Maglie ondulate ed elettrosaldate, giunti multiformi in strutture reticolari spaziali, acciaio crudo, forme aggraziate – architettura, arte, o semplice costruzione; opera dell’uomo o risultato di algoritmi e di robot?

Reinforce Expose presenta elementi di edifici costruiti con tecnologie robotiche da Gramazio Kohler Research dell'ETH di Zurigo, un gruppo pionieristico di architetti che indaga il potenziale dei robot industriali nell’architettura. Con l’obiettivo di innescare cambiamenti radicali nell’industria delle costruzioni e nella progettazione architettonica, la selezione di oggetti in mostra si presenta candidamente in un contesto improntato all’arte e al design, inserendosi nella storia della scultura in acciaio e sfidandone la logica puramente funzionale. Scevri delle tracce del processo di fabbricazione robotica, gli oggetti sono al tempo stesso sorprendentemente profani ed enigmaticamente complessi. Anche condividendone la stessa natura, rappresentano una profonda espressione di gabbie di armatura metallica, spingendosi oltre semplici esibizioni di realismo. Fatti per essere nascosti, vengono esposti rivelando la bellezza delle forme recondite di domani.
 

Bea Schlingelhoff
Auftrag

31 May – 01 July
Monday – Friday 10.30 am - 5.30 pm
Saturday 2 - 6 pm

Opening 30 May from 6.30 pm

Via del Vecchio Politecnico 3, 20121

View more on Artshell

Close
Close

Bosco Sodi
"In Saecula Saeculorum"

17 March – 20 May
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am-7pm (close 1-2.30 pm)

Opening 16 March from 7pm to 9pm

Via C. Farini 32, 20159

View more on Artshell

Brand New Gallery is pleased to present In Saecula Saeculorum, Bosco Sodi’s first solo exhibition at the gallery.
The title of the show is a Latin locution that expresses the idea of eternity and is literally translated as “unto the ages of ages” (forever and ever).

The exhibition features a new series of paintings on linen, accompanied by a few small volcanic rocks covered in red ceramic glaze. In Saecula Saeculorum questions and stands out the permanency of objects throughout the time.

Bosco Sodi shows his signature fissured, velvetised and encrusted paintings on linen, a new series of works that he started painting since late 2016. Compared to the prior works, which are heavily encrusted, these show a random and unorganized spatiality in between the matter. The spaces between these pigmented chunks show the absence of the materiality that the work expresses. Absence, can be read not as a lack of something but as a new element that counter balances the rest of the artwork components.

The artist uses a mixture of pure pigment, sawdust, wood pulp, natural fibers, water and glue to create a textured surface that dries into a monochromatic primordial landscape. By doing this process over a clean canvas he explores the volume of color, from deep red to purple and orange, all the way to a simple but strong black. The final result shows a terrestrial surface of which is built up by hand over the course of one or two days.

This is a demanding physical process that Sodi dubs as a continuous action, like a performance. Each piece’s process is influenced by factors beyond his control including climate, altitude, and water density.

"It never worries me to let work go. For me making art is about the process not the outcome." (Bosco Sodi)

Rose Wylie + José Lerma

01 June – 09 September
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am-7pm (close 1-2.30 pm)

Opening 31 May

Via C. Farini 32, 20159

View more on Artshell

Close
Close

Daniele Innamorato
curated by Giorgio Verzotti

30 March – 12 May
Monday – Friday
10am-6pm (closed 1-2 pm)

Opening 29 March from 7pm to 9pm

Marsèlleria
Via Paullo 12/A, 20135

View more on Artshell

Marsèlleria is glad to present Like No Tomorrow, new solo show by Daniele Innamorato, curated by Giorgio Verzotti. The exhibition will take place on the three floors of the space in via Paullo 12/a and will be open to the public from Thursday March 30th until Friday April 28th, 2017.

Like No Tomorrow is a monographic exhibition aiming at shining a light on the most recent production of the artist, following the will to account for the creative research started ten years ago by Daniele Innamorato.

The show, specifically conceived for the spaces of Marse?lleria, presents a selection of unreleased works, intended to prove the width of language that has always marked the poetic of Daniele Innamorato.

Daniele Innamorato mixes different materials, techniques and supports. He plays with dimensions, with production waste - which he gives new life-blood - and with the chance of effects, but also with the “causality” of events: always looking for a new expressive strength.

On show are presented large format paintings, artist books, cellophane and collages, proposing a wide overview of the artist’s works. Works where expressive power is always the common style. In Innamorato’s production painting is the absolute protagonist, through a vibration that is almost violent, where bright colors expand and overlie in a vivid explosion. Sketches, lines and spots mix and generate creative collisions: the works were born from a physical relationship with the material, opening infinite possibilities of formal solutions.

The works by Daniele Innamorato are generated by strong emotional pushes and do not have sure outcomes, but do not surrender to randomness: in the creative process the artist does not undergo chance but carries out a strong control over it, declaring himself as an opponent actor and giving life to an art which is accidental only at first glance.

Nothing is optional in Daniele Innamorato’s art: every waste of his works is regenerated in a new production, giving life to a universe of artistic creation which never stops. The enhancement of “remains” of his works allows a new sense rebuilding, starting from the fragment: the artist, through reality surplus, reshapes the space following a new narration. His big collages, for example, are composed by superimpositions of painting and different materials, expanding over the threshold of two-dimensionality, inviting the viewer to a physical confrontation with the canvas, to get lost in new interpretation levels.

The title Like no Tomorrow aims at making clear the passional, physical and timeless dimension of the totalizing creative process in which Daniele Innamorato is immersed: “Possessed by paining, I move inside color, the process feels like an endless ritual, a rhythm and a dance which leads me to work like there’s no tomorrow, exhausted, I stop”.

The exhibition path invites the visitor to forget his/her own reference points to abandon him-/ herself to the emotion of colors and to get lost in the interior energies swirl that Daniele Innamorato releases in the intensity of artistic creation.

“For Daniele Innamorato, painting is the expression of the vital rhythm that emerges almost mechanically and finds expression above all with the emotional force of color – says the curator Giorgio Verzotti - Stains, drips, superimpositions of chromatic fields, the surface looks like a battlefield where different tensions find no stillness. The viewer is captivated as in a visual vortex, where there are no preset dimensions, where every element plays its role, on the same level, to get to the final result.

At Marsèlleria, big formats, painted books, fluctuating cellophanes, collages composed by clippings of “waste” are on view, as everything is useful and nothing is unnecessary in the process of painting, which becomes an erotic act, driven by the anxiety of communicating its own state of being there. Like there’s no tomorrow.”

The exhibition will be accompanied by an artist book with texts curated by Giorgio Verzotti.

Dafne Boggeri
“LIANE~LINEA~ALIEN”

20 April – 19 May
Monday – Friday
10am-6pm (closed 1-2 pm)

Opening 19 April Opening & performance 7-10 pm

Marsèlleria
Via Privata Rezia 2, 20135

View more on Artshell

curated by Giulia Tognon

LIANE ~ LINEA ~ ALIEN is the first one-woman group show by Dafne Boggeri: it is a group show by one artist who reclaims her multiple roles, interests and trajectories, and takes place in the spaces of Marsèlleria. The project crosses three venues and pays tribute to places and people that have shared with the artist resistance attempts and dreams of intergalactic breakouts. For a month the basement of via privata Rezia will host a series of new works generated from impulses of manipulation and interference, documented or activated by the artist herself: a reflection on deception and sabotage. The Beltrade cinema will be open for an evening of sci-fi themed screenings, while the project will officially end with a choral performance by TISANA, collaborative and many-sided sound project, that will spread like lianas across the spaces of via Paullo.

April 19th, 7-10 pm LIANE ~ LINEA ~ ALIEN

opening and performance with STASIS (Aniela Piasecka, Olivia Norris, Isabel Palmstierna, Paloma Proudfoot)

Marsèlleria - via privata Rezia 2

May 5th, 6.30 pm - midnight BLACK MARIA cinema

screening program, visual interventions and dj set curated by Maria Guggenbichler

Cinema Beltrade - via Nino Oxilia 10

May 19th, 6-10 pm PAAUW.

sound interventions by TISANA (Dafne Boggeri, Adele H, Isamit Morales) in collaboration with Babakoto, Hazina, Elena Radice

Marsèlleria - via Paullo 12/A

Jacopo Miliani
Male Male Malen

01 June – 28 June
Monday – Friday
10am-6pm (closed 1-2 pm)

Opening 31 May from 7pm to 9pm

Via privata Rezia 2, 20135

View more on Artshell

MALE MALE MALEN

Jacopo Miliani

Performance May 31st, 7 pm - Marse?lleria via Paullo, 12/A - Milano

Exhibition preview May 31st, 4 - 7 pm - Marse?lleria via privata Rezia, 2 - Milano

Exhibtion: June 1st – June 28th 2017

Marse?lleria, via privata Rezia 2 Milano Mon - Fri 10 am - 1 pm and 2 - 6 pm, Sat and Sun by appointment

Marse?lleria presents Male Male Malen, solo exhibition by Jacopo Miliani, that will take place in the venue of via privata Rezia 2 from June 1st to June 28th. The exhibtion will be launched through a performance on May 31st in the venue of via Paullo 12/A, from 7 pm.

“Pittura maschio maschio.”

Remember those walls I built? Well, baby they're tumbling down they didn't even put up a fight. They didn't even make a sound.

“Lieber Maler” (Dear Painter)... a German painter said ... “Male Mir” (Paint for me)... Bringing painting to be not only a medium connected with looking, but also a gesture.

Jacopo Miliani’s show attempts to translate a personal universe through the painting medium, which has been taken on by the artist for the first time, with big irony.

In the exhibition, the body is at the centre of the representation: a carnivalesque explosion that, instead of masking itself, reveals its intimacy. Maybe, this is the proper role of the make-up and the mask. Movements and gestures, whose documentation is included inside the artwork itself, activate different elements of abstract, monochrome and also figurative painting.

Melancholic and absurd figures (mime, Pierrot, geisha), collide with childish memories creating a half-serious aura, connected with the exhibition environment. In the show there are different collaborations with performers and artists, including Miliani’s mother: Antonietta Federici Miliani, whose pictorial style counterpoises and challenges the conceptual feature of her son.

The show reveals painting not only as external surface, but also as a game that contains an emotional dimension, where you could mirror yourself or where a new face will be revealed.

Between order and disorder, there is a chaos that brings forth several questions. Starting with the title of the show: “Male Male Malen” is translated by Google Translator as “Pittura Maschio Maschio” (from Italian Male Male Painting). But also in many other different ways... It depends on the selected languages.

Which is the relationship among translation, painting and manhood representation?

Exhibition texts by: Joa?o Moura?o and Luis Silva, Francesco Urbano Ragazzi and Sara Giannini

Close
Close

Reinhard Mucha
"Schneller werden ohne Zeitverlust"

25 November – 30 June
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am-7 pm (closed 1.30-2.30 pm)

Opening 24 November from 6.30pm to 9pm

Via Stilicone 19, 20154

View more on Artshell

Lia Rumma Gallery is pleased to present the solo exhibition Schneller werden ohne Zeitverlust (Getting Faster without Time Loss) by Reinhard Mucha, which opens on 24 November 2016 at 6.30 p.m. in Milan.
The current show follows Mutterseelenallein, Mucha's exhibition opened on 29 June 1989 in Naples: it was a major event destined to leave its mark on the longlasting relationship between the Gallery and the artist. Those were the years of Mucha's remarkable solo exhibitions at the Kunsthalle Basel (Nordausgang) and Kunsthalle Bern (Kasse beim Fahrer) 1987, of Gladbeck, the show put on in 1986 at the Muse?e National d’Art Moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou, in Paris and the one shown two years previously at the Wu?rttembergischer Kunstverein in Stuttgart.

Mutterseelenallein – All Alone (The seats for attendants and visitors at the “Große Du?sseldorfer Kunstausstellung” shot at the Kunstpalast Ehrenhof in Du?sseldorf on December 30, 1979) is a distinctive museum piece in the form of sixteen wall- mounted display cases made of aluminum, float glass, enamel painted on reverse of glass, felt, 15 black-and-white photographs on baryta paper and wood, accentuating and transforming the gallery space in Naples into a site of melancholic elegance. At the centre of each case – except for one – was a black-and-white photograph of an empty chair. All different, the chairs were those that had been used by gallery attendants or tired visitors during the “Große Du?sseldorfer Kunstausstellung” exhibition, held ten years previously in Du?sseldorf. By examining the concept of the “art exhibition”, the work brought about a feeling of emptiness and loneliness, while also suggesting the poetry of waiting and symbolising the individual character of each of those inconspicuous chairs.

The history of this work is a series of events and moments captured and of poetic coincidences that occurred probably quite by chance. It is the story of an inescapable destiny that for many years has bound the artist to Italy.
Created for the spaces of Lia Rumma Gallery in Naples, the work remained for no less than nine years at the Museum fu?r Moderne Kunst in Frankfurt (M.). Events now lost in time meant that the work would eventually embark on a new journey, to Italy, where it landed once again in 2009 and where it became part of the permanent collection of Castello di Rivoli Museo d'Arte Contemporanea.

Schneller werden ohne Zeitverlust is the latest episode in a long voyage that has been going on for nearly three decades, and the final step in a process that has all the appearance of a homecoming.
Reinhard Mucha is presenting this new exhibition project with at its centre “Die Verwandlung” (“The Metamorphosis”) a model sculpture of the historic Mutterseelenallein installation in Frankurt. A piece in which the history of the work is condensed and where the incorporated video monitors repropose the images of the installation at the museum in Frankfurt. The entire exhibition spreads out from this nucleus, entering into a dialogue with a former industrial area of Milan in which the new gallery building has been constructed. It all fits in here, for the theoretical and conceptual premises at the heart of Mucha’s artistic research are once again able to bind effectively and directly with the architecture in which the exhibition takes shape as well as with the urban landscape surrounding.

In Insel der Seligen (Island of the Blessed), Mucha plays with this context and provocatively shows us a roof of ancient tiles as an image lying on the ground meticulously spread out on a bed of demolition rubble. The sense of drama and the key role of memory, its profound reflections and its criticism on urban reality are all chorally expressed in this profane room installation. It is no coincidence that in The Wirtschaftswunder - To the People of Pittsburgh, included in the exhibition, you can see industrial objects produced inside the factory that was housed in the premises where the artist still has his studio today in one of the former areas of heavy industries in Du?sseldorf.

The exhibition also includes the film Hidden Tracks never previously shown and some more new works that the artist has created over the years. This complete, comprehensive exhibition illustrates the complexity and depth of the work of one of Europe’s greatest contemporary artists. His work borrows direct and indirect references from Minimal Art and Postminimalism as well as from the world of Architecture and Design and refers to the critical discurse on museums praxis and its implicated issues. Combining them in an intimate, personal dimension, on a human scale, and with a powerful sense of transience, Reinhard Mucha creates works with a unique, unmistakable aesthetic and formal presence. These “containers” preside over the motionless portions of reality and everyday life within them. Through their preciseness, alienation and impersonality, these moments of the world convey all the sensations of an alien time, in a constant state construction and deconstruction.

Close
Close

Arman "Emersions"

17 February – 23 June
Monday – Friday 10 am-7 pm
Saturday by appointment

Opening 16 February 7-9 pm

Corso di Porta Nuova 38, 20121

View more on Artshell

Cardi Gallery in Milan is delighted to present the Italian debut of Arman: Emersions. The exhibition, staged in collaboration with Corice Arman and the Arman Marital Trust, features thirteen works from the series conceived in 1998 and 1999 by the artist, a French-born naturalized American.

 

The Emersions mark a new relationship between painting, which he had practiced since his childhood in Nice, and objects, to which he was drawn starting with his exhibition Allure d’objects (Galerie Saint Germain, Paris, 1960).

“Emersion” is the opposite of immersion; it is the act of surfacing, of coming out of a liquid environment and appearing on the surface, manifested before the eye. The fragmented objects appear to emerge from the organic background after having survived a shipwreck. As Arman commented when creating them: “Many works from this series make you think about natural accidents, such as lava flows or rivers of mud. But a manmade object finds itself drowned in it, as if it were wrong for man to oppose nature.”

These untitled paintings draw their inspiration from the tragic vision of a contaminated human landscape, covered with oil, garbage, or mud. The mineral effect of the surfaces of the objects derives from the metal plating applied to chairs and bicycles, fans, watering cans, and other objects, whereas the uniformity of color derives from the acrylic paint that Arman uses as coating or glue.

The series has only been exhibited once before at the Galerie Piltzer in Paris in 1999, and was published in a limited-edition book, where it is referred to as Nec Mergitur, echoing the motto of Paris, “Fluctuat nec Mergitur”, literally, being tossed by the waves but not sinking.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a richly illustrated book featuring texts by Arman and Marcelin Pleynet, Corice Arman and Chiara Spangaro, and photos of the paintings, the artist at work in his studio, and the Milan exhibition.

Close
Close

Rä di Martino
"The Day He Swims thru Marrakech"

23 March – 27 May
Tuesday – Friday 10 am-7 pm (closed 1-3 pm)
Saturday 12-7 pm

Opening 22 March from 6.30 pm

Via F. Viganò 4, 20124

View more on Artshell

We are pleased to announce an exhibition of sculptures and photographs by Ra? di Martino.

Cinema as sculpture is a historically complex theme that has emerged as a central focus in the research of this artist in recent years.

For her first solo show in Milan, she delves into the fertile territory shared by these two media – which are only apparently separated by a series of oppositions (stillness/movement, material/immaterial, second/third dimension...). But the stakes are raised by the fact that the artist goes deeper, along the fine line between backstage and film footage, raw material and its editing, protagonist and body double, reality and fiction, original and cover. The exhibition explores the relationship between the sculptural object and the image in motion, through a sequence of photographs and hybrid objects (stands from film sets that support natural elements, with stage lighting). Not just cinema, not just sculpture, the selected set of works springs from the same narrative source, namely "The Stand-In" (slated for release in September 2017), the first feature-length film by Ra? di Martino. The film is freely based on the feature film "The Swimmer" from 1964, starring Burt Lancaster. Di Martino takes her cue from both the story and the film to capture the suspended atmospheres of this famous surreal tale, in which a middle-aged man swims from pool to pool to cross the city to return home, re-living his life through a metaphorical voyage. In the re-enactment of the film di Martino chooses to set her version of the story in an equally metaphysical Marrakech, a contradictory city, ancient and modern at the same time, true and false, and in any case the reflection of a bourgeoisie in search of new motivations.

The photographs and stands are two apparently contradictory instruments of a single narrative. Room after room, the viewer is prompted to observe the scenes from the inside and from the outside.

These hybrid objects refocus the attention on the making of the image, on cinema in cinema, and on the analysis of the film devices themselves that make it possible to construct new meanings of History.

Paola Nicolin

Close
Close

Alessandro Agudio
"Tutti Avrebbero Dovuto Avere il Giornale Impermeabile"

26 March – 08 May
Saturday - Sunday
15-19 or by appointment

Opening 25 March from 5pm to 9pm

Via Merano 21, 20127

View more on Artshell

Imagine you are on a beach, at dusk, when the sun is down and everything around you gets colored of a pale pink. While you sip your cocktails and smoke a cigarette, you look at the coast glowing, preparing yourselves for your last night on holiday. This summer is ending again. The sky gets filled with clouds and a light breeze coming from the sea starts touching your skin: it will probably rain soon. You wonder how you can get some shelter to return home, and suddenly you think: if you had had the waterproof newspaper, everything would have been all right.

Alessandro Agudio’s research moves around these suggestions, through the formalization of objects that evoke exotic and futuristic atmospheres, yet related to our everyday life, to a certain idea of lifestyle. His works are characterized by shapes that are often bizarre but at the same time plausible, enhanced by a sophisticated obsession for surfaces and their details, which tend to soften them, to mitigate their rigidity in order to reveal their clumsy attitude of posing objects. The works are sneering, defiant, yet simultaneously melancholic. The titles emphasize this ambiguity, deliberately exaggerating the narrative potential of the works and suggesting a subtle irony in the gaze.

In the show you will find the most famous wooden spaceship on a Brazilian beach, a white fringed boot, a pair of bright lightnings and a character grabbing a guitar: be careful not to get wet.

Fanta and the artist would like to thank Martino Tremolada and Pietro Minelli for the valuable technical contribution.

Close
Close

1-0-2
Eugenio Barbieri presented by Dario Guccio and Davide Stucchi

29 March – 14 May
Saturday - Sunday
15-19 or by appointment

Opening 28 March from 6.30 pm

Via Privata Don Bartolomeo Grazioli 73, 20161

View more on Artshell

Armada invites Dario Guccio and Davide Stucchi to present the work by Italian artist Eugenio Barbieri. Born in Forlì and active in Paris in the 70s, Barbieri had a charismatic and original personality. His practice is known to a few, and the two  artists with “1-0-2” will bring new life to the strength of such a radical language.

Close
Close

Markus Schinwald

30 March – 20 May
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am-7 pm

Opening 29 March from 6 pm

Via A. Tadino 20, 20124

View more on Artshell

Giò Marconi is very pleased to announce his fourth solo show with Austrian artist Markus Schinwald.

Based on interests ranging from psychology and literature to dance and the history of fashion, Schinwald explores the idea of the human body as a cultural construct. Schinwald’s artistic repertoire consists of splayed table leg sculptures, distorted 19th century portraits, marionettes, films without beginning or end andsite-specific installations.

His art gives form to the psyche and its tensions and creates a mysterious and unsettling atmosphere that hints at its Viennese production context through references to decorative Biedermeier style or psychoanalysis. He concentrates on processes of manipulation and alteration of bodies and their surroundings through spatial works and architectural interventions.

In 2011, Markus Schinwald represented Austria at the 54th Venice Biennial with an installation that architecturally played with the existing space. Inside the Austrian pavilion Schinwald had constructed a mazy wall structure of suspended walls that opened the view onto other people’s legs therewith incorporating the visitors into the installation and making them protagonists.

The exhibition at Giò Marconi also plays with the gallery’s architecture and consists of two corresponding architectural works.

Upon entering the exhibition space the viewer walks towards a long row of ten canvas sack sculptures - all hung in a single file along one wall of the gallery, each filled with arrangements of Chippendale-legs, some splayed, some demure.

In his sculptural practice Schinwald has always been interested in the manipulation of pieces of furniture. He often uses Biedermeier table or chair legs, characteristic of a 19th-Century style. He saws them off and rearranges them in uncanny ways that bring out their anthropomorphic qualities. The half-hidden wooden parts stretch the fabric, which is reminiscent of the white cloth that is used to cover and protect furniture, thus creating weird and sexually allusive forms. The stretched fabric acts as both sling and cocoon, concealing joints and limbs that struggle as much as they acquiesce.

Besides the row of sacks Schinwald also intervenes with the actual gallery space: The jigsaw-like assembly of large, interlocking metal panels that extend across the ceiling, are embossed with a pattern that creates the impression of a complex, suspended machine, a kind of exposed mechanical viscera. The metal mimics the bas relief gesture of Rococo stucco, curving and extending overhead, blanketing the entire space in a mildly aggressive red sheen and giving the whole show a slightly erotic touch.

In transforming the white gallery ceiling into a red tiled artwork Schinwald bestows a completely different atmosphere upon the room and makes a Gesamtkunstwerk of the space.

Close
Close

Spencer Finch

30 March – 19 May
Monday – Friday: 10 am-6 pm (closed 1-3 pm)
Saturday by appointment

Opening 31 March from 7pm to 9pm

Via B. Zenale 3, 20123

View more on Artshell

Photography is a fundamental aspect of Spencer Finch’s work and has informed his practice in a multitude of ways throughout his career. Spurred by an ongoing investigation into the nature of colour and the elusive power of light, Finch uses photography – itself a combination of these two elements – as a way of capturing the fleeting and ephemeral, the things one cannot see, but also as a tool to record distinct moments in time. His exhibition at Lisson Gallery Milan celebrates this aspect of the artist’s oeuvre and features six works that have either been created using the medium of photography or in response to the photographic process. 

The passing of time perhaps most poignantly comes to the fore in Vanitas (Tulips) (2012), for which Finch documented the fallen petals of three floral arrangements, after having removed them from a vase. The delicate remains evoke the beauty of random patterns and the Dutch tradition of still life painting, offering a meditation on chance and death. Flowers appear again in Daisies (2017), the newest work in the exhibition, in which the camera tracks the movement of heads and stems as they tilt in the direction of the sun throughout the course of a day. The change in natural elements over a period of time is also evident in Finch’s photographic work Thank you, Fog (2009). Shot with a camera at one-minute intervals for an hour, the photographs depict the various states and densities of fog – a physical, yet impermanent phenomenon – as it descends over Sonoma County in California. The transition from revelation to concealment of the wooded landscape below abstracts the sensation of being lost in a cloudy bank to a single, planar colour. 

Photography’s blurring of the distinctions between representation and abstraction is further explored in Lemon Tree (2010), a sequence of 12 photographs that capture the transient shadows cast by a lemon tree from dusk till dawn to record the revolution of the sun around the tree. The work is inspired by Federico Garcia Lorca’s poem The Song of the Barren Orange Tree, a melancholic text in which a fruitless lemon tree begs a woodcutter to cut away its shadow so it can no longer see its barren silhouette. 

Shadows assist with the creation of the final work in the exhibition, Self-Portrait as Crazy Horse (1993), which masterfully mixes photography and performance. By painting a white wall of the gallery with light-sensitive Cyanotype emulsion paint, Finch transforms the space into both camera and dark room. As he stands between the wall and window from sunrise to sunset in the gallery, the light slowly processes the exposed chemicals on the wall, leaving only a faint silhouette at the centre – a negative image left behind as evidence of Finch’s performance and the record of a day. The work’s title evokes the nineteenth-century Oglala Sioux Chief, ‘Crazy Horse’, who distrusted photography and believed the camera would steal his shadow. The exhibition is extended through a new artist’s book by Finch, which documents the artist’s attempts to photograph white light. 

Close
Close

Ramak Fazel
Don’t Forget the Struggle

04 April – 13 May

Opening 07 April from 6.30pm to 9.30pm

Piazza Vetra 21, 20123

View more on Artshell

Don’t Forget the Struggle, nuovo progetto inedito del fotografo Ramak Fazel, incentra la propria ricerca attorno all’immaginario custom made e alla città di Pomona, una delle tante aree post industriali che costituiscono la cintura urbana attorno a Los Angeles ma che possono essere facilmente considerate come campioni su scala globale.  Pomona è il segno tangibile di un mondo post fordista che ha perso ogni possibilità di affidamento a sistemi produttivi solidi e consolidati, diventando cosi scenario di una sempre più estesa desertificazione economica e culturale. Una mancanza che ha portato a riconsiderare sistemi e filiere di produzione di massa in funzione di bisogni e consumi individuali o su piccola scala. Questo passaggio è testimoniato dalla cultura della customizzazione, gesto di affermazione di una propria identità culturale e sociale. Intrecciando percorsi paralleli, dalla scoperta delle origini più remote del movimento dell’America Chicana, alla scena hardcore punk come i Suicidal Tendencies o i Warzone - da cui prende spunto il titolo della mostra - dalle grafiche come la Screaming Hand di Jim Philipps (icona low-brow) per arrivare al fulcro della custum culture, gli originators alla Von Dutch e Larry Watson, Don’t Forget the Struggle è una celebrazione delle sottoculture locali, della loro rivalsa, delle energie e delle estetiche che ne scaturiscono. Ramak Fazel esce dalla sua comfort zone di fotografo per indossare - seguendo le linee guida dell’Arts and Crafts - le vesti di designer, mettendo a nudo tutto il processo che sta dietro alla realizzazione di un oggetto di design; dall’ideazione alla vendita. Mettendo in contrasto il panorama di gusto Low Rider con la sobrietà del Super Normal, il progetto si trasforma in narrazione attraverso una performance continuativa lungo tutto il Salone.

Lo spazio di MEGA subirà una metamorfosi: da spazio espositivo a vera e propria officina, un luogo di lavoro concreto e manuale in cui gli oggetti in esposizione sono posti sullo stesso piano dei macchinari e gli strumenti necessari alla loro realizzazione.  

 

Grazie allo Studio Legale MMB e allo Studio CCRZ per il sostegno

 

Bio Ramak Fazel 

Gli effetti della dislocazione geografica e delle contraddizioni interne all’identità culturale sono temi ricorrenti nella produzione di Ramak Fazel. Lavorando con, intorno e alle volte contro le tradizioni della fotografia, è stato portato a lavorare sull’idea di individuo come riflesso dei luoghi. Nel 2008 Ramak espone il suo progetto “49 Capitols” un essay fotografico del suo viaggio sulla 29 US State Capitols, a Storefront for Art and Architecture a New York. Nel 2014 in occasione delle 14esima Biennale di Architettura, nella sezione Monditalia, Ramak Fazel ha presentato il suo progetto in continua evoluzione “The Buisness of People”. Ramak ha un MFA e un BS in Ingenieria Meccanica alla Purdue University. Attualmente è visisting lecturer alla San  Francisco Art Institute. 

 

 

 

Don’t Forget the Struggle, a new unreleased project realized by the photographer Ramak Fazel, focuses the research around the custom made imaginary and the city of Pomona, one of the many post-industrial areas that create the urban belt around Los Angeles but it could easily be considered a sample on a global scale. Pomona is a tangible sign of a post-Fordist world that has lost all its ability to rely on solid and consolidated production systems, thus becoming a scenario of an increasing extensive economic and cultural desertification. This lack has led to a reconsideration of mass production systems as a function of individual needs and on a small scale. This passage is shown by the culture of customization, a gesture of affirmation of cultural and social identity. Weaving parallel paths, from the discovery of the remote origins of the America Chicana’s movement, from the hardcore punk scene of Suicidal Tendencies or Warzone - that inspired the title of this exhibition - from iconic graphic such as the Screaming Hand of Jim Philipps (low-brow icon) to the heart of custum cultures, the originators such as Von Dutch and Larry Watson. Don’t Forget the Struggle is a celebration of local subcultures, their revenge, the energy and the aesthetic that arises from these movements. Ramak Fazel leaves his comfort zone as a photographer to step into the shoes of a designer - following the guidelines and ideals of the Arts and Crafts movement - exposing the whole process behind the creation of a design object from its conception to sale. Emphasizing the contrast between the freshness of a Low Rider’s perspective with the sobriety of the Super Normal, the project becomes pure narration with an ongoing performance throughout the Salone del Mobile.

The space of MEGA will endure a metamorphosis: from an exhibition space to garage/workshop, a concrete and manual work place where the exhibited elements are placed on the same level as the equipment and tools required for their implementation.

 

Special thanks to MMB Studio and to CCRZ for their support

 

Bio Ramak Fazel 

The affect of geographic displacement and the inherent contradictions of cultural identity are themes at the heart of Ramak Fazel’s cultural production. Working within, around and sometimes against the traditions of photography and installation, he has examined the idea of the individual as a reflection of place and an expression of influences. In 2008, Ramak exhibited his project “49 Capitols,” a photographic essay on his trip through 49 U.S. State Capitols, at Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York City.  An installation of his ongoing project “The Business of People” was on exhibition at the Monditalia Section at the 14th International Architecture Exhibition la Biennale di Venezia in 2014. Ramak holds an MFA from CalArts and a BS in Mechanical Engineering from Purdue University. Currently, he’s a visiting lecturer at the San Francisco Art Institute.

 

Close
Close

Ben Rivers "Phantoms"
Curated by Lucia Aspesi. Artistic Direction: Edoardo Bonaspetti

21 April – 28 May
Tuesday – Sunday 10.30 am-8.30 pm
Thursday 10.30 am-11 pm

Opening 20 April from 7 pm

Viale E. Alemagna 6, 20121

View more on Artshell

“Phantoms” is the first solo show by Ben Rivers (1972, Somerset, UK) in an Italian institution, curated by Lucia Aspesi with artistic direction by Edoardo Bonaspetti.

This British artist and filmmaker’s work erases the boundaries between ethnological and documentary film, blending memory and fiction. His film essays describe unreal worlds, remote landscapes, and alien individuals from some obscure time, possibly past or future.

The artist’s work, predominantly in a 16mm format, has been presented in contemporary art centres as well as international film festivals. His language walks the line between art and cinema, exploring genres that range from thriller to noir by way of horror and science fiction.

For the exhibition at Triennale di Milano, Ben Rivers has conceived an environment that forms a reflection on memory. Three screens, each showing a film, are arranged to create an experimental narrative journey where different times and stories are interwoven. The works in the exhibition focus on the idea of collection, in both the institutional and personal context. The things we leave behind, used as guides to piece together the idea of an individual or a group.

In “Phantoms”, the figure of an “unreliable narrator” comes into play, as is often the case in Rivers’ work, suggesting voyages and shifts through distant times and places. At the entrance, the film The Shape of Things (2016) projects images of artefacts from the ethnological collections of the Harvard Art Museums: a Byzantine sculpture of a hermaphrodite and an anthropomorphic jug from Stone Age China are accompanied by the voice of American poet William Bronk reading his composition “At Tikal”. The poet’s words lead us to question the desire to create images of ourselves in an unending cycle of creation, destruction and renewal. A man’s life and memories provide the context for Phantoms of a Libertine (2012), inspired in part by Marcel Broodthaers’ Voyage on the North Sea (1974). In the film, a series of visual and textual elements extrapolated from a travel diary create an ambiguous biography made up of mysterious, dreamlike clues. In Things (2014) the narration shifts to the artist and his home. The description of elements making up his domestic environment – fragments of books, images, objects and sounds collected over the years – is at the same time a voyage through collective memory and imagination.

The narrations and stories presented in the works rhythmically articulate the exhibition, conceived as a structure open to discussion and possible misunderstandings: reality and imagination blur together, creating figures and presences that appear both tangible and dreamlike at the same time, in a carousel of voices and apparitions.

Christopher Williams "Models, Open Letters, Prototypes, Supplements"
curated by Pia Bolognesi and Giulio Bursi. Artistic Direction: Edoardo Bonaspetti

28 April – 25 June
Tuesday – Sunday 10.30 am-8.30 pm
Thursday 10.30 am-11 pm

Opening 27 April from 7 pm

Viale E. Alemagna 6, 20121

View more on Artshell

Produced within an engagement with the form of the ‘open letter’—an instrument deployed to give public form to private discourse—Models, Open Letters, Prototypes, Supplements is the first major solo museum exhibition by Christopher Williams since his series of retrospectives entitled The Production Line of Happiness (The Art Institute of Chicago; MoMA, New York; Whitechapel Gallery, London; 2014-2015).

A leading figure of the second generation of American Conceptual Art, Williams studied at the California Institute of the Arts in the late 1970s, under such artists as Michael Asher, John Baldessari, Douglas Huebler and Morgan Fisher, and has since developed an artistic practice that investigates photographic apparatus functions, structures, and rules through simultaneous engagement with other artistic media: film and video, sculpture, collage, performance, and printed matter.

Building on a series of recent exhibitions which focussed more closely on specific aspects of his practice – including Capitain Petzel, Berlin (Open Letter to Model No. 1740, 2016), gta Exhibitions, Zu?rich (Supplements, Models, Prototypes, 2017), and David Zwirner, London (Open Letter: The Family Drama Refunctioned? (From the Point of View of Production, 2017) – Williams’ exhibition at La Triennale di Milano brings together various aspects of his work, highlighting them as interconnected elements at play within a context in which both the studio and the exhibition become sites for material and discursive production.

Foregrounding exhibition architecture and design as the framework for looking, Models, Open Letters, Prototypes, Supplements presents a group of recent photographs within various mobile wall and exhibition systems, whose materials and designs have been collected from Williams’ recent exhibitions history, as well as supplementary material displayed in vitrines produced in 1975 by Leone Pancaldi, one of the driving forces behind the renewal of the modern Italian museum architecture. Williams explores aspects of realism traditionally associated with photography through the visual and aesthetic conventions that shape how we perceive our world. Family and society, cutaway and cross-section, object and function, ideology and immaterial labour, and time and duration are revealed as structures and models of representational systems, thus activating a progressive process of disclosure that aims at finding, for each individual element, the traces of their own representation. While the images reflect upon the political and socio-economic connections between photography and the production processes of late capitalist society, we are invited to reclaim the present as the moment for critical reflection. Addressing the viewer directly, Williams seeks to raise awareness of the quality of our observation process, in a relationship focusing on the very concept of duration.

Models, Open Letters, Prototypes, Supplementsopens up a physical and theoretical dialogue between ideal forms of photography, discursive materials selected and produced by the artist, tactics of display, and the exhibition architecture of La Triennale in which Williams’ images take a stance.

Close
Close

LA TERRA INQUIETA
Curated by Massimiliano Gioni

28 April – 20 August
Tuesday – Sunday
10.30 am-8.30 pm

Opening 27 April from 7 pm

La Triennale di Milano
Viale Emilio Alemagna 6, 20121

View more on Artshell

Organized by the Fondazione Nicola Trussardi
and Fondazione Triennale di Milano
For the Visual Arts Program of the Triennale directed by
Edoardo Bonaspetti

Milan, March 13, 2017 – La Triennale di Milano and the Fondazione Nicola Trussardi present La Terra Inquieta (The Restless Earth), an exhibition curated by Massimiliano Gioni and co-produced by the Fondazione Nicola Trussardi and Fondazione Triennale di Milano, as part of the Visual Arts Program of the Triennale directed by Edoardo Bonaspetti.

The exhibition, which will be open to the public from April 28 to August 20, 2017, is the result of a partnership between two institutions whose missions have always centered on the present, exploring the ways in which the experimental and innovative languages of contemporary art and culture can express radical changes in our world.
 
La Terra Inquieta borrows its title from a collection of poems by Édouard Glissant, a Caribbean writer who probed the question of how different cultures can coexist. The exhibition shares in Glissant’s project—a pressing and necessary one that tries to describe this unstable and agitated present as a polyphony of voices and narratives. Through the works of more than sixty artists from thirty-nine countries—such as Albania, Algeria, Bangladesh, Egypt, Ghana, Iraq, Lebanon, Morocco, Syria, and Turkey—which fill the ground-floor gallery of the Triennale and continue to the floor above, this exhibition charts both experiences and perceptions of migration and the current refugee crisis as an epoch-making transformation that is reframing contemporary history, geography, and culture.
 
La Terra Inquieta lets art take on the task of describing the changes, conflicts, and tensions that cause wars, mass migrations, and natural disasters,” says Clarice Pecori Giraldi, Vice President of La Triennale di Milano. “The Triennale, as a cultural institution keenly attuned to social changes, feels it must help tell this story, and reflect on the nameless multitudes that move ahead day after day in search of dignity. This exhibition, which is part of La Triennale di Milano’s Visual Arts Program, directed by Edoardo Bonaspetti, presents works by over sixty artists internationally which force us to look closely at our own aging world, and remember that not long ago, we were the ones crossing the seas in search of a new life and better opportunities.” 
 
The waves of migration touching every corner of our planet are a vital issue of our era" explains Beatrice Trussardi, President of the Fondazione Nicola Trussardi “one of the key themes around which global society must redefine itself. Hence the need to organize an exhibition like La Terra Inquieta, which takes a look at this issue filtered through the stories of the artists. Thinking about migration led us deep into the heart of a universal experience that links together men and women who come from different generations, religions, cultures, and places, but who are increasingly destined to coexist, sharing their stories, values, and lives. The goal of this exhibition is to convey at least some part of this experience to the public, so it can become a tool of knowledge, providing resources that aid the quest to find harmony between human beings. The fluid, constantly evolving identity of the Fondazione Trussardi has led us to adopt a new approach to tackling the same challenge we posed to ourselves at the outset of our adventure almost fifteen years ago: to describe the world around us by creating a space for shared reflection and a platform where individuals can make their own contributions to envisioning a new model for society."
 
Through installations, videos, documentary images, historical sources, and material artifacts, La Terra Inquieta explores real and imaginary geographies, reconstructing the odyssey of migrants through personal and collective tales of exodus inspired by varying degrees of urgency and longing. The exhibition revolves around a series of geographic and thematic lines of inquiry—the war in Syria, the state of emergency in Lampedusa, life in refugee camps, the figure of the nomad or stateless person, and Italian migration in the early 20th century—which intersect with works that serve as visual metaphors for conditions of mobility and precariousness.
 
Following the unequal and often exploitative exchanges of labor, commodities, and capital in our globalized economy, the exhibition attempts to trace a choral history of the multitudes of migrants who too often remain nameless. At the center of the exhibition is the video installation The Mapping Journey Project by Moroccan artist Bouchra Khalili: with disarming simplicity, the artist collected the stories of migrants who have traveled across entire continents seeking entry to Europe.
Juxtaposing art and reportage, La Terra Inquieta focuses in particular on how artists bear witness to historic events, and how art can address social and political change. Refusing the omniscient narratives of history and the media alike, many artists in the exhibition approach image-making from a personal perspective. The resulting works combine the traditional modes of journalism and documentary with narrative techniques akin to those used in literature, autobiography, and fiction. It is through this clash between dissonant forms of storytelling that many artists bring an element of doubt and critique into the image-based language of the mass media, revealing a new faith in art’s duty to describe and transform the world. Rather than just creating images of conflict, their images provide a space for the exchange of multiple viewpoints and narratives.
 
Together, these stories—poised between historical epic and real-time diary—yield a vision of art as lyrical reportage, sentimental documentary, and vivid, vital testimony. We find examples of this approach in works by John Akomfrah, Yto Barrada, Isaac Julien, Yasmine Kabir, and Steve McQueen, among others, which address specific events as metaphorical readings of broader historical crises. In these works, the very notion of indeterminacy is transformed into a narrative method that engages analytical and critical functions.
 
La Terra Inquieta sparks reflection on the right to one’s own image, another key theme addressed by many contemporary artists whose work takes on mainstream portrayals of global migration and the refugee crisis. Grappling with a public image that is shaped by sensationalist media, many artists of our time seek new ways of depicting migrants without falling into the media pitfalls of staging or spectacularizing tragedy and trauma. The oblique gaze of the photos by Yto Barrada, the elided details in the videos by Mounira Al Solh, or the grotesque transformations in the drawings and animations by Rokni Haerizadeh, are just a few examples—along with the refugee portrayed by Phil Collins—of how artists refuse to aestheticize suffering and instead work to restore the dignity of migrants by portraying them as historical agents or shielding them from the hyper visibility to which they have been subjected. This attitude, coupled with methods drawn from political activism and collective participation, can also be found in artists as diverse as Pawel Althamer, Andrea Bowers, Tania Bruguera, Paulo Nazareth, and Liu Xiaodong.
 
In the work of many contemporary artists, the quest for dignity in images is accompanied by an investigation of sculpture and its commemorative function. Artists Adel Abdessemed, Kader Attia, Banu Cenneto?lu, Meschac Gaba, Thomas Schütte, Andra Ursuta, and Danh Võ engage the tradition of the funerary monument from a contemporary standpoint. Many of the works on view seem unstable and fragile, embracing a strategy of precariousness: stripped of all excesses of sentimentality, these new monuments are instead charged with a sense of indignation.
 
One of the key questions in the exhibition is the function of images in a time of crisis. In the work of many contemporary artists, as art historian T.J. Demos has observed, the image itself becomes “migrant,” seeking truth in crisis while fomenting crisis in the concept of truth as a single, simplistic narrative. Many of the works in the exhibition depict the movement and migration of commodities across borders and barriers, whether ideological or economic. The projects by El Anatsui, Alighiero Boetti, Hassan Sharif, and Mona Hatoum form an atlas of global connections and interactions where art seems to replicate the traffic of goods in the international economy. In these works, the choice of materials and techniques—with their emphasis on mass-produced objects that are recycled or transformed as they move between countries and social contexts—seems to mimic the production, distribution, and outsourcing mechanisms of global industry. Similar issues concern artist Šejla Kameri? and the research groups Forensic Oceanography and multiplicity, who study the movement of people across borders.
 
La Terra Inquieta is the story of humanity crossing borders and—more tragically—of borders crossing humanity. But above all, it is an exercise in empathy and an experiment in cross-cultural dialogue and understanding, which becomes more relevant as Italy stands at the epicenter of the refugee crisis. As we are reminded by the words of Emma Lazarus at the base of the Statue of Liberty—seen in the video by Steve McQueen, which closes the exhibition—the mother of exiles welcomes the tired, the poor, the huddled masses, the tempest-tossed, and the wretched refuse of a teeming shore. 

Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close
Close

"Pascali Sciamano"
Curated by Francesco Stocchi

24 March – 24 June
Monday – Friday by appointment | Saturday free entry
11 am-6 pm

Opening 30 November

Via Cino del Duca, 4, 20122

View more on Artshell

The exhibition, aims to present the work of Pino Pascali (Bari, 1935 – Rome, 1968) in dialogue with what is commonly called “tribal art.” It allows visitors to explore the artist’s creative approach through his bond with African culture, beginning from his interest in primitivism as opposed to the myths of modern society and attention to totemism, the phenomena of animal/individual, and the animistic notion of nature. 
In fact, there are many synergies between tribal art and the poetics of Pino Pascali—an eclectic figure, sculptor, set designer, performer, and key player on the Italian art scene in the 1960s—who finds in African creative forms an inexhaustible source of inspiration in an attempt to open his practice up to a magical, fantastical, playful, and ambiguous dimension. The representation of stylized nature limited to its essential elements, the myth of primitivism, the use of the body as an extension of the work/object, the relationship between individual and collectivity, and the coexistence between the natural and the artificial characterize the investigations of Pascali, who stages but does not sublime Africa. He moves beyond sculptural essentiality and the study of figures in an attempt to restore that primordial harmony obfuscated by the prevailing intellectualism of the age while using matter as a tool of knowledge and a mythical invocation of life elements. 
In primitive societies, a shaman is a person who acts poised between two worlds—here and beyond—in a dialogue with the forces of nature and expresses himself through mythical symbolism that cannot be traced back to categories of ideas and logical truths. Acknowledging life outside man and transforming each behavior into a language is what unites Pascali to the rituals and myths of primitive cultures. PASCALI SCIAMANO is a surprising exploration through the career of Pascali between 1966 and 1968 that will allow visitors to discover less known works, some of which have never been shown previously. 
The itinerary interacts with the architecture, avoiding any direct confrontation between African works and the artist’s sculptures, but instead intimately relates his creations, almost as if evoking a free narration. The exhibition unfolds across the Foundation’s three floors, each of which is dedicated to one of the three years (1966/1967/1968) of his brief yet prolific career.

Close