Galleries & Museums

Galleries & Museums
20 Pirelli HangarBicocca
22 Galleria Lia Rumma
3 Cardi Gallery
7 Galleria Monica De Cardenas
25 La Triennale
26 Fondazione Nicola Trussardi
5 Galleria Raffaella Cortese
6 Cortesi Gallery
18 Francesca Minini
27 ZERO...
12 kaufmann repetto
8 Massimo De Carlo
21 Fondazione Prada
23 Federica Schiavo Gallery
10 Fanta Spazio
14 Gió Marconi
11 Istituto Svizzero
2 Brand New Gallery
15 Marsèlleria
24 Tile Project Space
16 MEGA
1 Armada
13 Lisson Gallery
17 miart
19 Peep-Hole
9 Le Dictateur
4 Fondazione Carriero
Galleries & Museums
Pirelli HangarBicocca

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Pirelli HangarBicocca

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Pirelli HangarBicocca

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Galleria Lia Rumma

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Cardi Gallery

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Galleria Monica De Cardenas

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Galleria Monica De Cardenas

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La Triennale

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Fondazione Nicola Trussardi

La Triennale di Milano Viale Emilio Alemagna 6, 20121

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Galleria Raffaella Cortese

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Cortesi Gallery

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Francesca Minini

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ZERO...

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kaufmann repetto

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Massimo De Carlo

Lambrate/Ventura Via G. Ventura 5, 20134

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Massimo De Carlo

Palazzo Belgioioso Piazza Belgioioso 2, 20121

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Fondazione Prada

Fondazione Prada Milano Largo Isarco 2, 20139

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Fondazione Prada

Fondazione Prada Osservatorio Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II 63, 20121

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Fondazione Prada

Fondazione Prada Milano Largo Isarco 2, 20139

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Federica Schiavo Gallery

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Fanta Spazio

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Gió Marconi

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Istituto Svizzero

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Brand New Gallery

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Brand New Gallery

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Marsèlleria

Via Privata Rezia, 2, 20135

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Tile Project Space

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MEGA

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Armada

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Fondazione Carriero

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Gió Marconi

Via A. Tadino 20, 20124

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kaufmann repetto

Via di Porta Tenaglia 7, 20121

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Galleria Raffaella Cortese

Via A. Stradella 1, 4, 7, 20129

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Brand New Gallery

Via C. Farini 32, 20159

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Cardi Gallery

Corso di Porta Nuova 38, 20121

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Galleria Monica De Cardenas

Via F. Viganò 4, 20124

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Massimo De Carlo

Via G. Ventura 5 / Palazzo Belgioioso, Piazza Belgioioso 2,

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Pirelli HangarBicocca

Via Chiese 2, 20126

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Istituto Svizzero

Via del Vecchio Politecnico 3, 20121

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Lisson Gallery

Via B. Zenale 3, 20123

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miart

Viale L. Scarampo, 20149

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Francesca Minini

Via Massimiano 25, 20134

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Galleria Lia Rumma

Via Stilicone 19, 20154

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La Triennale

Viale E. Alemagna 6, 20121

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ZERO...

Viale Premuda 46, 20129

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Marsèlleria

Via privata Rezia 2, 20135

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Fondazione Nicola Trussardi

Piazza E. Duse 4, 20122

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Le Dictateur

FutureDome, Via Paisiello 6,

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Fondazione Prada

Largo Isarco 2, 20139 / Osservatorio Fondazione Prada,

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Fondazione Carriero

Via Cino del Duca, 4, 20122

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Fanta Spazio

Via Merano 21, 20127

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Tile Project Space

Via Garian 64, 20146

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Armada

Via Privata Don Bartolomeo Grazioli 73, 20161

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MEGA

Piazza Vetra 21, 20123

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Federica Schiavo Gallery

Via Barozzi 6, 20122

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Cortesi Gallery

Corso di Porta Nuova 46/B, 20121

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10 Corso Como

Corso Como 10 - 20154

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Bar Basso

Via Plinio 39 - 20129

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La Belle Aurore

Via Privata G. Abamonti 1 - 20129

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Fioraio Bianchi Caffè

Via Montebello 7 - 20121

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Carminio

Via Del Carmine 3 - 20121

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Carpaccio

Via L. Palazzi 19 - 20124

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Charmant

Via G. Colombo 42 - 20133

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Grand Hotel et de Milan

Via A. Manzoni 29 - 20121

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Lile in cucina

Via F. Guicciardini 5 - 20129

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Panificio Davide Longoni

Via G. Tiraboschi 19 - 20135

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Pasticceria Marchesi

Via Santa Maria alla Porta 11a - 20123

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Trattoria Masuelli San Marco

Viale Umbria 80 - 20135

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La Nuova Arena

Piazza Lega Lombarda 5 - 20154

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Pavé

Via F. Casati 27 - 20124

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Antica Trattoria della Pesa

Viale Pasubio 10 - 20154

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Picchio

Via Melzo 11 - 20129

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Piero e Pia

Piazza D. Aspari 2 - 20129

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Polpetta DOC

Via B. Eustachi 8 - 20129

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Vivaio Riva

Via Arena 7 - 20123

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Osteria del Treno

Via San Gregorio 46 - 20124

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Violette

Via P. Castaldi 14 - 20124 

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Fonderia Artistica Battaglia

Via Stilicone 10 - 20154

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Mandarin Oriental

Via Andegari 9 - 20121

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Pasticceria Cucchi

Corso Genova 1 - 20123

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Otto

Via Paolo Sarpi 10 - 20154

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DRY Cocktails & Pizza

Via Solferino 33 - 20121

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Capetown Café

Via Vigevano 3 - 20144

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Pisacco

Via Solferino 48 - 20121

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CONVERSO

CLS Architetti - San Paolo Converso Piazza S. Eufemia, Milano - 20122

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Osgemeos “Efêmero”
curated by Cedar Lewisohn

21 April – 23 April
Thursday – Sunday
10 am-10 pm

Opening 20 April

Via Chiese 2, 20126

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Pirelli HangarBicocca presents the new public mural, Efêmero, the first large-scale mural in Italy by OSGEMEOS, who are among the world’s most renowned contemporary artists. This work on the outer walls of Pirelli HangarBicocca, to be inaugurated on April 20, 2016, is part of the new three-year project “Outside the Cube," which will involve innovative new approaches to art in public space and a rich calendar of parallel events. The industrial site of Pirelli HangarBicocca, where in the last century trains were made, will become the ideal setting for the work of OSGEMEOS and the many artists to follow.

The project at Pirelli HangarBicocca will delve deeper into the artist’s unique universe of mysterious symbolism and alternative realities. OSGEMEOS’s works often huge in scale, matched with its distinctive patterns and colour schemes, referencing the natural world and improvisation of Sao Paulo. The project will explore the history and spectacular architectural setting of Pirelli HangarBicocca, using the site as a starting point for an iconic new production. The mural will not only be painted on the buildings facade but be incorporated into the buildings architecture. This is an ongoing theme in the artists work, to create murals that transform the facade of a building into a new structure. The project will be accompanied by a limited edition catalogue designed by the artists. The book will explore further the artists history of architectural interventions and include images of their works that have repurposed the built environment.

Curated by artist and writer Cedar Lewisohn - who has authored many publications on art, and curated the exhibition “Street Art at Tate Modern” in 2008 - the project by OSGEMEOS will occupy the two outer walls of Pirelli HangarBicocca’s Cubo space, covering a total area of a thousand square meters. It will also be visible from the nearby train tracks and from the street.

OSGEMEOS, literally meaning “the twins,” is the pseudonym of Brazilian twin brothers Gustavo and Otavio Pandolfo (b. 1974 in Sao Paulo). This artistic duo, whose roots are in hip-hop culture and graffiti, began in the 1980s to develop a highly sophisticated oeuvre recognizable for its dreamlike landscapes and poetic figures, drawing on a vast range of cultural, social and political references.

Miroslaw Balka "CROSSOVER/S"
Curated by Vicente Todolí

16 March – 30 July
Thursday – Sunday
10 am-10 pm

Opening 15 March 7 pm

Via Chiese 2, 20126

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Pirelli HangarBicocca presents “CROSSOVER/S,” the first retrospective in Italy by Miroslaw Balka, one of the leading artists of the last three decades, whose work explores human life, human nature, and individual and collective memory. Reflecting on the history of Europe and especially of Poland, his birthplace and home, Balka draws on autobiographical elements and episodes to create works that address universal themes in a powerfully evocative way.

The exhibition, curated by Vicente Todoli?, brings together fifteen iconic sculptures, installations, and videos made from the 1990s to the present, along with a new project, Holding the Horizon (2016), a video conceived specifically for the show at Pirelli HangarBicocca.

The artistic career of Miroslaw Balka (b. 1958 in Warsaw) began in the mid-1980s, with figurative sculptures connected to his own life story and to the historical and political context of post-war Poland. In the early 1990s, Balka abandoned anthropomorphic forms to concentrate on depicting symbolic objects like beds, pedestals and fountains, in works that allude to the human presence without ever portraying it. Frequently based on ordinary materials like wood, salt, ashes, soap, cement and steel, they often employ the dimensions of the artist’s own body as a unit of measurement, as the titles make clear. This creates a proportional relationship directly linking the human figure to space, vision, experience, and memory.

“CROSSOVER/S,” conceived for the Navate space at Pirelli HangarBicocca, is meant to focus public attention on this later period in Balka’s artistic investigation and oeuvre, through an immersive exhibition full of physical, symbolic, and temporal intersections, where even light and darkness take on a key role and where viewers are made aware of their own presence and function within the space. In the artist’s words, “It is important to remind the visitor that they are not only eyes, but also the body that walked in the space” (Miroslaw Balka, in Dylan Kerr, “Sculptor Miroslaw Balka on the Romance of Conceptual Art,” Artspace, 2015).

The exhibition both starts and ends with a symbolic horizon that draws the viewer’s gaze into its depths. Over the door that serves as both the entrance and exit of the Navate, Balka has chosen to place a LED screen with the video Holding the Horizon (2016), which which shows the unstable image of a yellow line. After moving through the space, visitors see the work once again on their way out. The show is thus conceived as a circular route that brings out new aspects and connotations in the works on view.

At the heart of the exhibition is Cruzamento (2007), a cross-shaped structure made out of wire cage, incorporating five fans. In this installation, Balka reflects on the concepts of transit and passage, creating a junction in the center of the Navate that becomes a threshold visitors must cross to continue on their way. The downward blast of air from the fans means they must make an additional effort to move through it. The same idea crops up elsewhere in “CROSSOVER/S,” with works like 200 x 760 x 550 The Right Path (2008/2015), a dark metal corridor visitors are invited to walk down, which seems to lead somewhere outside the exhibition space.

In the Cubo space, after entering through a narrow doorway, they find Yellow Nerve (2012/2015), an almost imperceptible work that emphasizes the vast dimensions of the space, playing on its height: a thin, slowly twisting yellow thread hangs down from ceiling to floor. Placed at the far end of the exhibition, this vertical line seems to connect with the horizontal line in Holding the Horizon at the beginning, yielding a metaphorical intersection between different planes.

The artist has designed the show to engage visitors not just through their eyes or intellect, but through their bodily dimensions and all other modes of perception. Balka has therefore placed the works on every surface of the Navate—the floor, walls, and ceiling—and stimulates our senses of hearing, touch, and smell. Hence the videos projected on the ground, the endless echo of black-tinted water that trickles over metal in the looming fountain of Wege zur Behandlung von Schmerzen (2011), or the intense smell that wafts from Soap Corridor (1995)—a work first conceived for the 1993 Venice Biennale—lead visitors to focus on their movement through the space and their presence within it.

Balka analyzes how individuals perceive the space around them, and explores human experience through constant spatial and sensory intersections and contrasts, along a path that reveals the symbolic significance of his works. Springing at times from personal recollections, they constantly summon up an intimate, domestic dimension, as in Common Ground (2013/2016), an installation of doormats collected from houses on a street in Krakow, through which the artist reflects on the concept of entrances and thresholds, and on the privacy of the home, or a collective dimension—like in 7 x 7 x 1010 (2000), a column made from bars of soap evoking the memory of unknown people from Warsaw who used them.

In “CROSSOVER/S,” these individual motifs are also interwoven with references to recent Polish history, and to the collective memory of dramatic events from the past that are still vivid in the present, like World War II and the Holocaust: BlueGasEyes (2004), a video installation in which the image of two gas burners is projected on a layer of salt on the floor, evokes the image of the domestic hearth, but also suggests possibilities of violence; while in the installation 250 x 700 x 455, ø 41 x 41/Zoo/T (2007/2008), the playful connotations of the zoo in the title give way to a dramatic flashblack of the one built in the Treblinka camp for the entertainment of the guards.

Contemporary time does not exist, we cannot catch the continuous. As we move ever into the future we are always based in the past. This is the state of my sculpture [...] Everything we touch is coming from the past, it’s our access to death. For me the important thing in my art is to try to catch that consciousness of life. (in Frances Morris, “Dawn,” exhibition guide, Tate Gallery 1995-1996).

In the exhibition at Pirelli HangarBicocca, past and present constantly intersect, mapping out a journey through time where personal memories and myths are tied to the collective ones of a population, shedding light on complex historical dynamics still difficult to face.

Rosa Barba "From Source to Poem to Rhythm to Reader"
Curated by Roberta Tenconi

05 May – 08 October
Thursday – Sunday
10 am-10 pm

Opening 04 May 7 pm-midnight

Via Chiese 2, 20126

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From May 5 to October 8, 2017, Pirelli HangarBicocca presents Rosa Barba’s solo exhibition “From Source to Poem to Rhythm to Reader,” curated by Roberta Tenconi: a project that brings together fourteen works made since 2009, including 35mm and 16mm films, kinetic sculptures, and site-specific pieces.

Barba’s exhibition “From Source to Poem to Rhythm to Reader,” hosted in the Shed space at Pirelli HangarBicocca, weaves an intense dialogue between the works on view and the industrial setting that houses them. The five films in the show, seen here for the first time in Italy, include The Empirical Effect (2009), an exploration of the landscape around Vesuvius as a web of natural, mental, and cultural forces, and the artist's two most recent works: Enigmatic Whisper (2017), shot in the studio of artist Alexander Calder, and From Source to Poem (2016), a densely layered audio-visual narration, increasingly overlapping and condensing, analogous to white noise, filmed in the Audio-Visual Conservation Center of the Library of Congress in Culpeper, Virginia, the world’s largest multimedia archive.

Rosa Barba (b. 1972 in Agrigento, Italy, based in Berlin), whose work has won many awards and been featured at international exhibitions and festivals, has chosen film as her primary tool of expression. For years, Barba has experimented with the language of cinema and sculpture, reflecting on the poetic qualities of the natural and human landscape, exploring the idea of place as a vessel of memory, and dismantling the notion of linear time. Powerfully striking images, portraits of obsolete architecture and natural landscapes, and visions of remote deserts turn up throughout her works, combined with fragments of text and scenarios where past and present intertwine.

“What I try to express in my films is that time is based on individual and smaller collective histories and is a very malleable and flexible phenomenon. In my films there are usually different time scales running parallel. My perspective as an observer is non-judgmental. I assume reality is a fiction that is based on individual interpretations of real events. My movies mostly play with the idea that they could happen in the future as well as in the past and are trying to manifest as a utopian solution.

(Rosa Barba in conversation with Mirjam Varadinis and Solveig Øvstebø, in Time as Perspective, Ostfildern: Hatje Cantz, 2013)

The Exhibition

The 35mm film From Source to Poem (2016), co-produced by Pirelli HangarBicocca and CAPC muse?e d’art contemporain de Bordeaux, France, with the participation of Tabakalera, Donostia, Spain, is shot in Culpeper, Virginia at the Packard Campus for Audio-Visual Conservation, part of the Library of Congress: more than 90 miles of shelves that hold a collection of over four million items, both moving-image (films, videos, television episodes) and audio recordings (music, spoken word, radio broadcasts) in obsolete formats as well as modern digital files. Following on a previous trilogy titled The Hidden Conference (2010- 15)—a project where Barba’s camera explores the storage areas of the Neue Nationalgalerie in Berlin, the Capitoline Museums in Rome, and Tate Modern in London—this new film juxtaposes voices speaking different languages with written text and words, mingling images from the Packard Campus with others shot in the desert, a place the artist considers a vast expanse of memory and an archive in its own right.

Along with desert scenes, Barba often shows us abandoned human landscapes, which have become the wreckage of a past era, places that take on a mysterious significance in our time. For instance, her film Subconscious Society, a Feature (2014) describes the end of the industrial age, alternating between a future “the present” in which protagonists are set in a type of memory theater, an evocative, moldering space, and the past “future”, set in powerful images of the bereft objects and buildings of industrial sites.

Personal histories and events are often the starting point for narratives that walk the line between experimental documentary and science fiction, where it is hard to tell memory from make-believe. The protagonists of The Empirical Effect (2009) are residents of the "red zone” around Vesuvius who survived the volcano’s last eruption in 1944. Blurring together different levels of narration, this film set around Vesuvius—for Rosa Barba a metaphor for the complex relationships between society and politics in Italy—stages an evacuation drill that has never been held.

In Rosa Barba’s practice, personal contact with the people who are tied to a given place is combined with a long, painstaking process of research and investigation. For Enigmatic Whisper (2017), her camera gained access to the studio of American sculptor Alexander Calder (1898-1976) in Roxbury, Connecticut, which has remained untouched since his death in 1976. Barba’s film offers a portrait of one of his sculptures, which has borne witness over many years to the joyful creative universe of this great figure in twentieth-century art history.

Rosa Barba’s work ultimately extends into a conceptual practice where the medium of film is employed to explore any possible aspect of its material, sculptural, and narrative qualities and the ways itarticulates space. Rolls of film or 16mm projectors often become compositional elements in kinetic sculptures that project sequences of colored light, focusing attention on the idea of movement and rhythm.

In The Long Poem Manipulates Spatial Organizations (2014), for instance, the projector is tilted 45 degrees to create a distorted image in which cut-out letters unfold across the screen like the notes of a score.

Whilst in Hear, There, Where the Echoes Are (2016), beams of light and color pour into the space and over visitors through a kinetic installation of sound and light, with five projectors synchronized to the rhythm of a drum score, showing a more performative aspect of Rosa Barba’s work.

On the occasion of the exhibition “From Source to Poem to Rhythm to Reader,” from summer 2017 a catalog titled From Source to Poem will be available with contributions by Rosa Barba, Manuel Borja-Villel, Giuliana Bruno, Joan Jonas, E?lisabeth Lebovici and Roberta Tenconi. The publication is bilingual, Italian and English, and published by Hatje Canz and Pirelli HangarBicocca.

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Reinhard Mucha
"Schneller werden ohne Zeitverlust"

25 November – 30 June
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am-7 pm (closed 1.30-2.30 pm)

Opening 24 November from 6.30pm to 9pm

Via Stilicone 19, 20154

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Lia Rumma Gallery is pleased to present the solo exhibition Schneller werden ohne Zeitverlust (Getting Faster without Time Loss) by Reinhard Mucha, which opens on 24 November 2016 at 6.30 p.m. in Milan.
The current show follows Mutterseelenallein, Mucha's exhibition opened on 29 June 1989 in Naples: it was a major event destined to leave its mark on the longlasting relationship between the Gallery and the artist. Those were the years of Mucha's remarkable solo exhibitions at the Kunsthalle Basel (Nordausgang) and Kunsthalle Bern (Kasse beim Fahrer) 1987, of Gladbeck, the show put on in 1986 at the Muse?e National d’Art Moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou, in Paris and the one shown two years previously at the Wu?rttembergischer Kunstverein in Stuttgart.

Mutterseelenallein – All Alone (The seats for attendants and visitors at the “Große Du?sseldorfer Kunstausstellung” shot at the Kunstpalast Ehrenhof in Du?sseldorf on December 30, 1979) is a distinctive museum piece in the form of sixteen wall- mounted display cases made of aluminum, float glass, enamel painted on reverse of glass, felt, 15 black-and-white photographs on baryta paper and wood, accentuating and transforming the gallery space in Naples into a site of melancholic elegance. At the centre of each case – except for one – was a black-and-white photograph of an empty chair. All different, the chairs were those that had been used by gallery attendants or tired visitors during the “Große Du?sseldorfer Kunstausstellung” exhibition, held ten years previously in Du?sseldorf. By examining the concept of the “art exhibition”, the work brought about a feeling of emptiness and loneliness, while also suggesting the poetry of waiting and symbolising the individual character of each of those inconspicuous chairs.

The history of this work is a series of events and moments captured and of poetic coincidences that occurred probably quite by chance. It is the story of an inescapable destiny that for many years has bound the artist to Italy.
Created for the spaces of Lia Rumma Gallery in Naples, the work remained for no less than nine years at the Museum fu?r Moderne Kunst in Frankfurt (M.). Events now lost in time meant that the work would eventually embark on a new journey, to Italy, where it landed once again in 2009 and where it became part of the permanent collection of Castello di Rivoli Museo d'Arte Contemporanea.

Schneller werden ohne Zeitverlust is the latest episode in a long voyage that has been going on for nearly three decades, and the final step in a process that has all the appearance of a homecoming.
Reinhard Mucha is presenting this new exhibition project with at its centre “Die Verwandlung” (“The Metamorphosis”) a model sculpture of the historic Mutterseelenallein installation in Frankurt. A piece in which the history of the work is condensed and where the incorporated video monitors repropose the images of the installation at the museum in Frankfurt. The entire exhibition spreads out from this nucleus, entering into a dialogue with a former industrial area of Milan in which the new gallery building has been constructed. It all fits in here, for the theoretical and conceptual premises at the heart of Mucha’s artistic research are once again able to bind effectively and directly with the architecture in which the exhibition takes shape as well as with the urban landscape surrounding.

In Insel der Seligen (Island of the Blessed), Mucha plays with this context and provocatively shows us a roof of ancient tiles as an image lying on the ground meticulously spread out on a bed of demolition rubble. The sense of drama and the key role of memory, its profound reflections and its criticism on urban reality are all chorally expressed in this profane room installation. It is no coincidence that in The Wirtschaftswunder - To the People of Pittsburgh, included in the exhibition, you can see industrial objects produced inside the factory that was housed in the premises where the artist still has his studio today in one of the former areas of heavy industries in Du?sseldorf.

The exhibition also includes the film Hidden Tracks never previously shown and some more new works that the artist has created over the years. This complete, comprehensive exhibition illustrates the complexity and depth of the work of one of Europe’s greatest contemporary artists. His work borrows direct and indirect references from Minimal Art and Postminimalism as well as from the world of Architecture and Design and refers to the critical discurse on museums praxis and its implicated issues. Combining them in an intimate, personal dimension, on a human scale, and with a powerful sense of transience, Reinhard Mucha creates works with a unique, unmistakable aesthetic and formal presence. These “containers” preside over the motionless portions of reality and everyday life within them. Through their preciseness, alienation and impersonality, these moments of the world convey all the sensations of an alien time, in a constant state construction and deconstruction.

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Arman "Emersions"

17 February – 21 July
Monday – Friday 10 am-7 pm
Saturday by appointment

Opening 16 February 7-9 pm

Corso di Porta Nuova 38, 20121

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Cardi Gallery in Milan is delighted to present the Italian debut of Arman: Emersions. The exhibition, staged in collaboration with Corice Arman and the Arman Marital Trust, features thirteen works from the series conceived in 1998 and 1999 by the artist, a French-born naturalized American.

 

The Emersions mark a new relationship between painting, which he had practiced since his childhood in Nice, and objects, to which he was drawn starting with his exhibition Allure d’objects (Galerie Saint Germain, Paris, 1960).

“Emersion” is the opposite of immersion; it is the act of surfacing, of coming out of a liquid environment and appearing on the surface, manifested before the eye. The fragmented objects appear to emerge from the organic background after having survived a shipwreck. As Arman commented when creating them: “Many works from this series make you think about natural accidents, such as lava flows or rivers of mud. But a manmade object finds itself drowned in it, as if it were wrong for man to oppose nature.”

These untitled paintings draw their inspiration from the tragic vision of a contaminated human landscape, covered with oil, garbage, or mud. The mineral effect of the surfaces of the objects derives from the metal plating applied to chairs and bicycles, fans, watering cans, and other objects, whereas the uniformity of color derives from the acrylic paint that Arman uses as coating or glue.

The series has only been exhibited once before at the Galerie Piltzer in Paris in 1999, and was published in a limited-edition book, where it is referred to as Nec Mergitur, echoing the motto of Paris, “Fluctuat nec Mergitur”, literally, being tossed by the waves but not sinking.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a richly illustrated book featuring texts by Arman and Marcelin Pleynet, Corice Arman and Chiara Spangaro, and photos of the paintings, the artist at work in his studio, and the Milan exhibition.

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Rä di Martino
The Day He Swims thru Marrakech

23 March – 28 July
Tuesday – Saturday
3-7 pm

Opening 22 March from 6.30 pm

Via F. Viganò 4, 20124

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We are pleased to announce an exhibition of sculptures and photographs by Ra? di Martino.

Cinema as sculpture is a historically complex theme that has emerged as a central focus in the research of this artist in recent years.

For her first solo show in Milan, she delves into the fertile territory shared by these two media – which are only apparently separated by a series of oppositions (stillness/movement, material/immaterial, second/third dimension...). But the stakes are raised by the fact that the artist goes deeper, along the fine line between backstage and film footage, raw material and its editing, protagonist and body double, reality and fiction, original and cover. The exhibition explores the relationship between the sculptural object and the image in motion, through a sequence of photographs and hybrid objects (stands from film sets that support natural elements, with stage lighting). Not just cinema, not just sculpture, the selected set of works springs from the same narrative source, namely "The Stand-In" (slated for release in September 2017), the first feature-length film by Ra? di Martino. The film is freely based on the feature film "The Swimmer" from 1964, starring Burt Lancaster. Di Martino takes her cue from both the story and the film to capture the suspended atmospheres of this famous surreal tale, in which a middle-aged man swims from pool to pool to cross the city to return home, re-living his life through a metaphorical voyage. In the re-enactment of the film di Martino chooses to set her version of the story in an equally metaphysical Marrakech, a contradictory city, ancient and modern at the same time, true and false, and in any case the reflection of a bourgeoisie in search of new motivations.

The photographs and stands are two apparently contradictory instruments of a single narrative. Room after room, the viewer is prompted to observe the scenes from the inside and from the outside.

These hybrid objects refocus the attention on the making of the image, on cinema in cinema, and on the analysis of the film devices themselves that make it possible to construct new meanings of History.

Paola Nicolin

Katherine Bradford

09 June – 28 July
Monday to Friday
From 10am to 7pm (closed 1-3pm)

Opening 08 June from 6.30 pm

Via F. Viganò 4, 20124

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We are pleased to announce the first exhibition in Italy by American painter Katherine Bradford.

Bradford’s recent paintings are depictions of water and swimmers, both playful and profound. Painting and swimming share immersion and a certain loss of control that is simultaneously wild and structured. The body in nature; we see ourselves situated in relationship to the deep other.

Bradford’s swimmers are not lit from some external light source but seem to generate their own brightness. The world seems milky and dreamlike. This comes from the act of painting, the painter breathing light and life into her canvasses. Bradford spends months and sometimes years building up the surfaces of her paintings, slowly changing the paintings through repeated application of thinned out acrylic paint or scuffed on thicker stuff: this gradual activity creates animation and a floating quality.

Bradford often refers to the humor in her paintings. In the past the subject matter pointed more obviously in this direction: UFOs with tractor beams, Superman, Skinny boxers with raised gloves and lonesome ocean liners were used to create a self- depreciating painterly pop encyclopedia. Her recent work holds pathos and humor in equal measure.

One reason her paintings have become more and more relatable is that even as she depicts specific motifs, she relentlessly touches on the biggest themes and forces us to confront them – fear, wonder, vulnerability, hubris, and joy. In her newest work, she even more deliberately sets her scenes in larger, planetary landscape-stages. The characters are moving along the surface of the earth, and between underworlds and outer space. The paintings suggest rapture in all senses of the word – enchantment and bliss, as well as imminent demise.

Katherine Bradford was born in 1942 in New York and lives and works in Brooklyn, New York and Brunswick, Maine. She has shown her work at P.S.1, The Brooklyn Museum, and many galleries in New York and abroad. In 2011 Bradford was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship and in 2012 a Joan Mitchell Grant. She has taught as a resident faculty at Skowhegan in 2009 and for many years was on the MFA faculty of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia. Her work is in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Brooklyn Museum, and the Portland Museum of Art.

 

Siamo lieti di annunciare la prima mostra in Italia della pittrice americana Katherine Bradford.

I dipinti recenti di Bradford, che rappresentano figure umane nell’acqua, sono al tempo stesso giocosi e profondi. Dipingere e nuotare hanno in comune l’immersione e una certa perdita di controllo, che e? insieme selvaggia e strutturata. Il corpo nell’acqua ci mette in relazione con questo elemento fluido, profondo e insondabile.

I nuotatori di Bradford non sono illuminati da una fonte di luce esterna, ma sembrano emanare luminosita?, mentre il paesaggio appare lattiginoso e onirico. Cio? proviene dal suo modo di dipingere: la pittrice infonde luce e vita alle sue tele. L’artista trascorre mesi e talvolta anni a realizzare le superfici dei suoi dipinti, che cambiano lentamente attraverso la stesura di vari strati di pittura acrilica. Quest’attivita? graduale crea nelle sue tele un senso di oscillazione e fluttuazione; l'atto di spostare una figura un po’ piu? a destra o a sinistra diviene sia la storia, che la superficie del dipinto finale.

Bradford parla spesso dell'umorismo nelle sue opere. In passato i suoi contenuti andavano piu? chiaramente in quella direzione: UFO, Superman, pugili magri con guantoni sollevati e transatlantici solitari ne erano i protagonisti e venivano usati per creare un'autoironica enciclopedia pop. I dipinti recenti contengono pathos e humor in uguale misura. Sono sempre piu? coinvolgenti perche?, anche se l’artista rappresenta situazioni specifiche, sfiora continuamente grandi temi, quali paura, meraviglia, vulnerabilita?, arroganza e gioia. Ambienta le sue opere in scenari ampi, quasi planetari; le figure si muovono lungo la superficie della terra, tra il mondo sommerso e lo spazio infinito. I dipinti suggeriscono un coinvolgimento fatto di incanto e beatitudine, ma anche di smarrimento e transitorieta?, emanando una luce che sembra ultraterrena. E? facile immaginare l’artista al lavoro, che lentamente dipinge e cancella, trovando piacere e creando mondi nuovi mentre attinge dalla memoria e dalle sensazioni, raggiungendo il pieno equilibrio e controllo della sua poetica.

Katherine Bradford e? nata nel 1942 a New York, vive e lavora a Brooklyn, New York e Brunswick, Maine. Le sue opere sono state esposte al P.S.1, al Brooklyn Museum e in numerose gallerie a New York e all'estero. Nel 2011 Bradford e? stata premiata con una borsa di studio del Guggenheim e nel 2012 con il Joan Mitchell Grant. Ha insegnato a Skowhegan nel 2009 e per molti anni ha insegnato al MFA dell'Accademia di Belle Arti a Philadelphia. Le sue opere sono nelle collezioni del Metropolitan Museum of Art, del Brooklyn Museum e del Portland Museum of Art.

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Christopher Williams "Models, Open Letters, Prototypes, Supplements"
curated by Pia Bolognesi and Giulio Bursi. Artistic Direction: Edoardo Bonaspetti

28 April – 25 June
From Tuesday to Sunday
From 10.30 am to 8.30 pm

Opening 27 April from 7 pm

Viale E. Alemagna 6, 20121

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Produced within an engagement with the form of the ‘open letter’—an instrument deployed to give public form to private discourse—Models, Open Letters, Prototypes, Supplements is the first major solo museum exhibition by Christopher Williams since his series of retrospectives entitled The Production Line of Happiness (The Art Institute of Chicago; MoMA, New York; Whitechapel Gallery, London; 2014-2015).

A leading figure of the second generation of American Conceptual Art, Williams studied at the California Institute of the Arts in the late 1970s, under such artists as Michael Asher, John Baldessari, Douglas Huebler and Morgan Fisher, and has since developed an artistic practice that investigates photographic apparatus functions, structures, and rules through simultaneous engagement with other artistic media: film and video, sculpture, collage, performance, and printed matter.

Building on a series of recent exhibitions which focussed more closely on specific aspects of his practice – including Capitain Petzel, Berlin (Open Letter to Model No. 1740, 2016), gta Exhibitions, Zu?rich (Supplements, Models, Prototypes, 2017), and David Zwirner, London (Open Letter: The Family Drama Refunctioned? (From the Point of View of Production, 2017) – Williams’ exhibition at La Triennale di Milano brings together various aspects of his work, highlighting them as interconnected elements at play within a context in which both the studio and the exhibition become sites for material and discursive production.

Foregrounding exhibition architecture and design as the framework for looking, Models, Open Letters, Prototypes, Supplements presents a group of recent photographs within various mobile wall and exhibition systems, whose materials and designs have been collected from Williams’ recent exhibitions history, as well as supplementary material displayed in vitrines produced in 1975 by Leone Pancaldi, one of the driving forces behind the renewal of the modern Italian museum architecture. Williams explores aspects of realism traditionally associated with photography through the visual and aesthetic conventions that shape how we perceive our world. Family and society, cutaway and cross-section, object and function, ideology and immaterial labour, and time and duration are revealed as structures and models of representational systems, thus activating a progressive process of disclosure that aims at finding, for each individual element, the traces of their own representation. While the images reflect upon the political and socio-economic connections between photography and the production processes of late capitalist society, we are invited to reclaim the present as the moment for critical reflection. Addressing the viewer directly, Williams seeks to raise awareness of the quality of our observation process, in a relationship focusing on the very concept of duration.

Models, Open Letters, Prototypes, Supplementsopens up a physical and theoretical dialogue between ideal forms of photography, discursive materials selected and produced by the artist, tactics of display, and the exhibition architecture of La Triennale in which Williams’ images take a stance.

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LA TERRA INQUIETA
Curated by Massimiliano Gioni

28 April – 20 August
Tuesday – Sunday
10.30 am-8.30 pm

Opening 27 April from 7 pm

La Triennale di Milano
Viale Emilio Alemagna 6, 20121

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Organized by the Fondazione Nicola Trussardi
and Fondazione Triennale di Milano
For the Visual Arts Program of the Triennale directed by
Edoardo Bonaspetti

Milan, March 13, 2017 – La Triennale di Milano and the Fondazione Nicola Trussardi present La Terra Inquieta (The Restless Earth), an exhibition curated by Massimiliano Gioni and co-produced by the Fondazione Nicola Trussardi and Fondazione Triennale di Milano, as part of the Visual Arts Program of the Triennale directed by Edoardo Bonaspetti.

The exhibition, which will be open to the public from April 28 to August 20, 2017, is the result of a partnership between two institutions whose missions have always centered on the present, exploring the ways in which the experimental and innovative languages of contemporary art and culture can express radical changes in our world.
 
La Terra Inquieta borrows its title from a collection of poems by Édouard Glissant, a Caribbean writer who probed the question of how different cultures can coexist. The exhibition shares in Glissant’s project—a pressing and necessary one that tries to describe this unstable and agitated present as a polyphony of voices and narratives. Through the works of more than sixty artists from thirty-nine countries—such as Albania, Algeria, Bangladesh, Egypt, Ghana, Iraq, Lebanon, Morocco, Syria, and Turkey—which fill the ground-floor gallery of the Triennale and continue to the floor above, this exhibition charts both experiences and perceptions of migration and the current refugee crisis as an epoch-making transformation that is reframing contemporary history, geography, and culture.
 
La Terra Inquieta lets art take on the task of describing the changes, conflicts, and tensions that cause wars, mass migrations, and natural disasters,” says Clarice Pecori Giraldi, Vice President of La Triennale di Milano. “The Triennale, as a cultural institution keenly attuned to social changes, feels it must help tell this story, and reflect on the nameless multitudes that move ahead day after day in search of dignity. This exhibition, which is part of La Triennale di Milano’s Visual Arts Program, directed by Edoardo Bonaspetti, presents works by over sixty artists internationally which force us to look closely at our own aging world, and remember that not long ago, we were the ones crossing the seas in search of a new life and better opportunities.” 
 
The waves of migration touching every corner of our planet are a vital issue of our era" explains Beatrice Trussardi, President of the Fondazione Nicola Trussardi “one of the key themes around which global society must redefine itself. Hence the need to organize an exhibition like La Terra Inquieta, which takes a look at this issue filtered through the stories of the artists. Thinking about migration led us deep into the heart of a universal experience that links together men and women who come from different generations, religions, cultures, and places, but who are increasingly destined to coexist, sharing their stories, values, and lives. The goal of this exhibition is to convey at least some part of this experience to the public, so it can become a tool of knowledge, providing resources that aid the quest to find harmony between human beings. The fluid, constantly evolving identity of the Fondazione Trussardi has led us to adopt a new approach to tackling the same challenge we posed to ourselves at the outset of our adventure almost fifteen years ago: to describe the world around us by creating a space for shared reflection and a platform where individuals can make their own contributions to envisioning a new model for society."
 
Through installations, videos, documentary images, historical sources, and material artifacts, La Terra Inquieta explores real and imaginary geographies, reconstructing the odyssey of migrants through personal and collective tales of exodus inspired by varying degrees of urgency and longing. The exhibition revolves around a series of geographic and thematic lines of inquiry—the war in Syria, the state of emergency in Lampedusa, life in refugee camps, the figure of the nomad or stateless person, and Italian migration in the early 20th century—which intersect with works that serve as visual metaphors for conditions of mobility and precariousness.
 
Following the unequal and often exploitative exchanges of labor, commodities, and capital in our globalized economy, the exhibition attempts to trace a choral history of the multitudes of migrants who too often remain nameless. At the center of the exhibition is the video installation The Mapping Journey Project by Moroccan artist Bouchra Khalili: with disarming simplicity, the artist collected the stories of migrants who have traveled across entire continents seeking entry to Europe.
Juxtaposing art and reportage, La Terra Inquieta focuses in particular on how artists bear witness to historic events, and how art can address social and political change. Refusing the omniscient narratives of history and the media alike, many artists in the exhibition approach image-making from a personal perspective. The resulting works combine the traditional modes of journalism and documentary with narrative techniques akin to those used in literature, autobiography, and fiction. It is through this clash between dissonant forms of storytelling that many artists bring an element of doubt and critique into the image-based language of the mass media, revealing a new faith in art’s duty to describe and transform the world. Rather than just creating images of conflict, their images provide a space for the exchange of multiple viewpoints and narratives.
 
Together, these stories—poised between historical epic and real-time diary—yield a vision of art as lyrical reportage, sentimental documentary, and vivid, vital testimony. We find examples of this approach in works by John Akomfrah, Yto Barrada, Isaac Julien, Yasmine Kabir, and Steve McQueen, among others, which address specific events as metaphorical readings of broader historical crises. In these works, the very notion of indeterminacy is transformed into a narrative method that engages analytical and critical functions.
 
La Terra Inquieta sparks reflection on the right to one’s own image, another key theme addressed by many contemporary artists whose work takes on mainstream portrayals of global migration and the refugee crisis. Grappling with a public image that is shaped by sensationalist media, many artists of our time seek new ways of depicting migrants without falling into the media pitfalls of staging or spectacularizing tragedy and trauma. The oblique gaze of the photos by Yto Barrada, the elided details in the videos by Mounira Al Solh, or the grotesque transformations in the drawings and animations by Rokni Haerizadeh, are just a few examples—along with the refugee portrayed by Phil Collins—of how artists refuse to aestheticize suffering and instead work to restore the dignity of migrants by portraying them as historical agents or shielding them from the hyper visibility to which they have been subjected. This attitude, coupled with methods drawn from political activism and collective participation, can also be found in artists as diverse as Pawel Althamer, Andrea Bowers, Tania Bruguera, Paulo Nazareth, and Liu Xiaodong.
 
In the work of many contemporary artists, the quest for dignity in images is accompanied by an investigation of sculpture and its commemorative function. Artists Adel Abdessemed, Kader Attia, Banu Cenneto?lu, Meschac Gaba, Thomas Schütte, Andra Ursuta, and Danh Võ engage the tradition of the funerary monument from a contemporary standpoint. Many of the works on view seem unstable and fragile, embracing a strategy of precariousness: stripped of all excesses of sentimentality, these new monuments are instead charged with a sense of indignation.
 
One of the key questions in the exhibition is the function of images in a time of crisis. In the work of many contemporary artists, as art historian T.J. Demos has observed, the image itself becomes “migrant,” seeking truth in crisis while fomenting crisis in the concept of truth as a single, simplistic narrative. Many of the works in the exhibition depict the movement and migration of commodities across borders and barriers, whether ideological or economic. The projects by El Anatsui, Alighiero Boetti, Hassan Sharif, and Mona Hatoum form an atlas of global connections and interactions where art seems to replicate the traffic of goods in the international economy. In these works, the choice of materials and techniques—with their emphasis on mass-produced objects that are recycled or transformed as they move between countries and social contexts—seems to mimic the production, distribution, and outsourcing mechanisms of global industry. Similar issues concern artist Šejla Kameri? and the research groups Forensic Oceanography and multiplicity, who study the movement of people across borders.
 
La Terra Inquieta is the story of humanity crossing borders and—more tragically—of borders crossing humanity. But above all, it is an exercise in empathy and an experiment in cross-cultural dialogue and understanding, which becomes more relevant as Italy stands at the epicenter of the refugee crisis. As we are reminded by the words of Emma Lazarus at the base of the Statue of Liberty—seen in the video by Steve McQueen, which closes the exhibition—the mother of exiles welcomes the tired, the poor, the huddled masses, the tempest-tossed, and the wretched refuse of a teeming shore. 

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Miroslav Balka
"In Bezug auf die Zeit"

04 May – 29 July
Tuesday – Saturday
10 am-7.30 pm (closed 1-3 pm)

Opening 03 May from 7pm to 9pm

Via A. Stradella 1, 4, 7, 20129

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Galleria Raffaella Cortese is pleased to announce Miroslaw Balka’s fourth show in the gallery’s three exhibition spaces, at a time of great attention towards the Polish artist’s work thank to his first Italian retrospective, curated by Vicente Todoli?, currently on view at Pirelli HangarBicocca, until July 30th.

Miroslaw Balka initiated his artistic research in the Eighties, and immediately began an intimate observation and investigation of the deep meaning of human existence, starting from himself and his own body, placing himself in relation to mankind and its history. The memory of his own experiences, from catholic rituals to family traditions, is intertwined with a highly evocative consciousness, suggestive of an intimate and social path, that tells us of revelations and oblivion, of wounds and healing.

The materials used by Miroslaw Balka, wood, salt, ashes, iron and soap, place themselves in a precarious balance between daily life and rituals, in the same way that his body becomes a critical measure of his works.

The exhibition is conceived as a journey in stages spanning across three decades of Balka’s artistic production, from works created in the 90s to those made specifically for the gallery’s venues.

The title of the show, In Bezug auf die Zeit, in German, is by no chance based on the definition of acceleration in physics, which is the increment of velocity in relation to a time interval. The artist extrapolates only the second part of the definition, which we can translate as “in relation to time”. Through the exhibition’s itinerary we can recognize two fundamental moments in Balka’s research: the transition from figurative to abstract, which characterizes the group of works that will be presented in the gallery’s main exhibition space in via Stradella 7, and the passage from material to gesture which captivates the works presented between the spaces in via Stradella 1 and 4, in a continuos discovery of references. 

Salt, an element which has always been at the foundation of Miroslaw Balka's work as an extremely beautiful material that is also capable of producing pain when it touches an open wound, is always present across the exhibition’s three venues, and becomes the show’s common thread. From Blue Wave (1990), Balka’s first work to employ this material, on view at via Stradella 7 to the work 71 x 65 x 21 exhibited in via Stradella 1, salt becomes a work of art on its own with its materiality, greatness and specificity.

he solo shows dedicated to the artist are: ‘CROSSOVER/S’ at HangarBicocca, Milano, ‘Fragment’ Akademie Der Kunste, Berlin e CCA Warsaw, ‘Between Honey & Ashes’, Douglas Hyde Gallery, Dublin (2011), Museo Reina Sofia, Madrid (2010), Modern Art Oxford, Oxford and Tate Modern, London (2009) Museum of Contemporary Art, Rijeka and Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin (2007), K21 Kunstsammlung Nordrhein Westfalen, Du?sseldorf (2006), Museum of Contemporary Art, Strasbourg (2004), Kroller - Muller Museum, Otterlo (2001) Dundee Contemporary Arts, Scotland (2002) and Stedelijk Museum voor Actuelle Kunst (SMAK), Gent (2001).

Balka has also taken place in a number of group shows, such as: ‘Building Memory’ CCA, Tel Aviv, HMKV, Dortmund and Museum Stzuki, Lodz (2010) e Contemporary Art Centre, Vilinius (2009) SITE Santa Fe 6th Biennale, New Mexico (2006) the Sydney Biennale (2006), Venice Biennale (2005, 1993 and 1990) and Documenta IX (1992).

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Nicola De Maria
From the Venice Biennale 1990

04 May – 21 July
Monday-Friday, 10.30 am - 7 pm
Saturday 12 am - 6 pm

Opening 03 May from 6pm to 8.30pm

Corso di Porta Nuova 46/B, 20121

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Ahead of the opening of the 57th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia, Cortesi Gallery is delighted to announce the launch of a new space in Milan, with an exhibition dedicated to Italian Transavanguardia artist, Nicola De Maria. The show brings together the five monumental canvases created by De Maria on the occasion of his participation at the Venice Biennale in 1990, and pays tribute to the biennial and the artists who took part in it over the years. Milan is the third location of Cortesi Gallery. Founder and director Stefano Cortesi, together with his sons Andrea and Lorenzo, opened the first branch in Lugano in 2013, followed by a gallery in London in 2015.

“The decision to open in Milan draws on the necessity of meeting Italian collectors’ needs and tap into the ever-expanding international audience, attracted to the city by its wide offering of popular events and the growing number of museums and private foundations,” said Andrea and Lorenzo Cortesi. “For us, it is an important return and homage to our Milanese roots and the new 350-square-metre space will offer unprecedented possibilities in terms of display”.

Since its inaugural exhibition in Lugano, Italian Art ‘60-’90, which presented works by modern masters such as Agostino Bonalumi, Enrico Castellani and Lucio Fontana - Cortesi Gallery has always developed its programme with input from art experts, curators and institutions, in Italy and abroad (Zero Foundation, Museum of Contemporary Art in Zagreb, Paolo Scheggi Archive, Agostino Bonalumi Archive, Raccolta Lercaro, to name a few). Cortesi Gallery also presented the first UK retrospectives of Grazia Varisco and Gianfranco Pardi, as well as of Croatian artist, Ivan Picelj.

“I have decided to turn my passion for art into a business”, stated founder and director Stefano Cortesi, who comes from a background in finance. “I feel confident to say that we left a very positive mark in the art scene in terms of research, quality of exhibitions and presence at fairs. Initially, we decided to focus solely on the most historicised post- war period, from the 1950s to the 1960s, which is also a time of great innovation in art. Over the past years, this particular sector has recorded a strong market interest, allowing us to exhibit well-known artists, as well as doing research on other artists like Paolo Scheggi – who at the time we started showing his pieces, lacked due recognition – and we have contributed to their rise in value. As a gallery, we reached a remarkable visibility very quickly: now, having opened an outpost in London and consolidated our position on the European scene, we decided to turn to Milan, and in doing so we chose to expand further our exhibition offering. We have always focused on artists who have pursued an optical, kinetic and geometric theme, now we want to look at painting and colour. Over the years, we have noticed a loss of interest in the exponents of Transavanguardia from the market and some dealers who followed their careers and promoted them in the 80s and 90s. We strongly believe in the quality of their work and we will endeavor to give adequate visibility to artists of this movement.”

Nicola De Maria is one of the protagonists of the Italian Transavanguardia, a movement defined in the mid-70s by art historian and critic Achille Bonito Oliva. An expression of transition, the Transavanguardia abandoned the avant-gardes’ positivism and certainties in favour of cultural nomadism, stylistic eclecticism and a rehabilitation of painting and manners, both abstract and figurative, freely condensed in the same work.

In 1990, De Maria was invited for the third time to participate in the Venice Biennale, and exhibited at the Italian Pavilion alongside Giovanni Anselmo, Alighiero Boetti, Dadamaino, Gino De Dominicis, Alberto Garutti, Giuseppe Maraniello, Carlo Maria Mariani, Vettor Pisani and others.

The curators, Laura Cherubini, Flaminio Gualdoni and Lea Vergine, assigned one entire room to each of the artists: in his, De Maria realised an immersive intervention, where flat fields of colour drowned the walls of his room in yellow, red, blue, orange, violet and green, and on which he installed the five large-scale canvases on view at Cortesi Gallery in Milan. The Teste Orfiche (as the artists titled them, numbering them from I to V) are each 3-metres in height and some measure over 5-metres in width. The works recall geometric shapes, natural landscapes, imagined starry skies and, at the same time, the visual suggestions of a musical score. With their chromatic ‘violence’, these pieces involve and encompass the viewer in an endless space of colour. They thrive on a peculiar light that comes from within, rather than form the outside, an effect achieved by De Maria through his use of natural pigments in a return to the primal techniques of painting.

At the exhibition in Milan, these five large canvases will be displayed with smaller scale historical works, as they were at the 1990 Venice Biennale, and again at the re-showing of the display at the Centro per l'Arte Contemporanea Luigi Pecci in 2012.

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Mandla Reuter

08 May – 29 July
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am-7.00 pm

Opening 07 May 11 am-8 pm

Via Massimiano 25, 20134

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Francesca Minini is pleased to announce Mandla Reuter’s third solo exhibition at the gallery.

Point of origin of Mandla Reuter’s work in recent years often was a piece of land on a paper street near downtown Los Angeles. Purchased for the exhibition, A Plot, at De Vleeshal in Middelburg, Netherlands in 2010, Reuter has regularly drawn from this empty lot as a fount of source material. While sitting vacant in East L.A. with an occupiable area of around 400 square meter the site served him as a studio of endless dimensions unlimited by geography.

Similar to Gordon Matta Clark’s anarchitecture, this piece of land exists only through the translation the artist provides through his works. Lately Reuter’s approach broadened up to other parts in the world like e.g. Iquitos, Peru, Buenos Aires, Argentina or, most recently, a block of white marble in a 20ft sea-container traveling on a ship between Thasos, Greece and Los Angeles, USA.

Reuter’s exhibition at Francesca Minini consists of a combination of works, which emerged from this artistic research. Departing from the question on how the world today is explored and viewed at Reuter, is showing a body of work circling around the matter of urbanization and nature.

The Grid (2015) is an installation made of 1.000 liters of table water and an altered manhole cover made of cast iron, which the artist exported from the city Iquitos. With this work Reuter is interweaving the plot of land in Los Angeles with a city in the Peruvian rainforest. Although located in the middle of the continent in the Northern Amazon basin close to the borders of Colombia and Brazil, Iquitos has the character of an island, only reachable by boat or plane. The work is a portrait of a city, an image consisting of essential infrastructural elements of most larger settlements, sewage system and water supply.

Another work in the exhibition, titled Atlantis (2016) in reference to the fictional island which falls out of favor with the Greek gods and is submerged and lost in the Atlantic Ocean, consists of an inflatable lift bag. Also known as salvage balloons, these objects are primarily used by archeologists and submarine salvage teams in order to transport material from the ocean ground back to the surface. This is often man-made material, which has encountered ill-fate or has been lost at sea. Poetically the function of the bag is to return to the light, which was hidden and often forgotten. The artist’s version liberates the lift bag from its intended use lending it the appearance of a beached whale. Atlantis aims to salvage ideas of history making them legible at the surface, at the same time to reflect upon the past in conjunction with the present.

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João Maria Gusmão + Pedro Paiva
“Avantesma Fantasma" e "a b&w ghost show”

08 May – 15 July
Tuesday – Friday, 11 am - 7 pm
Saturday 3-7 pm

Opening 07 May From 11am to 8pm

Viale Premuda 46, 20129

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Pae White
Demimondaine

09 May – 09 September
Tuesday – Saturday (Monday by appointment)
11 am-7.30 pm

Opening 08 May official opening from 6pm; Open also on 7 May

Via di Porta Tenaglia 7, 20121

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kaufmann repetto is pleased to present Demimondaine, Pae White’s sixth solo exhibition with the gallery.

The exhibition title lends itself to the French “demi-monde” or “half-world”, a popular phrase at the turn of the early twentieth century characterizing those living opulent, pleasure-driven lifestyles. The derivative “demimondaine” spoke of the women that lived on the fringe of respectable society, straddling the standards of the “real-world”. Their way of life a challenge of the status quo but existing within the confines of those very ideals - a controlled excess, a chaos within boundaries.

Pae White’s work utilizes both the most advanced technology and skilled artisans to emphasize the simultaneous limitations and intricacies of each and to contort the connotations of the functional versus the decorative. White’s monumental new, digitally woven tapestries are the scale of backdrops, suggetsing the stage-like quality of our own existence. The reflectivity of the quicksilver-like threads mirrors and objectifies our viewership, magnifying and distorting our presence amidst the cacophony of images and information. The commotion of the woven plants and bugs provide non-hierarchical noise; allowing a space for reverie and contemplation. The artworks on view were created utilizing software programming that randomizes distribution patterns and offers the potential for millions of outcomes. Each of the patterned plants represented in the backdrop tapestries posses psychotropic properties, imagined to be the future of healing and calming the chaos of one’s internal world.

The use of mirrors as an allusion of an alternate, and perhaps, better place is also demonstrated within Pae White’s suspended mobiles. The individual facets mirror the space in shifting perspectives, suggesting that the present could actually be in another place and of another time.

Pae White’s sculptural still-life works pull their forms from a library of digitally-dimensional clip-art meant to exist in the virtual worlds of video games and animations. These forms are not intended to be brought into our world or rendered in a three-dimensional way. Unlike the fantastical temptation of their flattened counterparts, the realized objects appear flawed, withered, and uncomfortable - their integral color feeling “far away”.

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Andra Ursuţa
THE MAN FROM THE INTERNET

09 May – 14 July
Tuesday – Saturday
11.30am-7pm

Opening 08 May 6pm to 9pm

Lambrate/Ventura
Via G. Ventura 5, 20134

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Massimo De Carlo is pleased to present The Man From The Internet, a solo show by artist Andra Ursut?a.

Andra Ursut?a’s practice encompasses a variety of mediums including installations, sculptures and drawings. As aptly put by Natalie Bell, who co-curated Andra Ursut?a’s exhibition Alps at the New Museum for contemporary art in New York in 2016: “Whether cathartic or just damning, fatalism reverberates through Ursut?a’s work... It gnaws on the bones of failure and folly, to be sure, but in all forms [...] it is animated by dark humour and tender irony, and wrapped in cynical puns.”

The Man From The Internet exhibits for the first time the completion of a project that the artist started in 2007, composed by a series of one hundred ink drawings on paper. Each drawing is a hand rendered version of an image found on the Internet that the artist first encountered on an ambiguous unofficial Russian-English news website, that has now been closed down. The web source presents the pixelated low-resolution image of the decaying corpse of a fallen participant in the Russian/Chechen conflicts of the 1990s as documentation of an excavated mass grave. The equivocality of the website - caught in between journalism and propaganda - leaves unclear both the identity and the circumstances of the death of this unknown human being.

The image of this dead man constantly changed possible political interpretations throughout the duration of this ten-year long project. Andra Ursut?a began working on this series in the aftermath of the break up of the former Soviet Block. The projects readings continue to shift as the events that shape the current political landscape that defined the geopolitics of this decade unfold. While the imagery of war populates ever more our laptops and smart phones via the Internet, the artist reflects on our relationship with political activism and how, as put by Andra Ursut?a, “no personal human engagement with any cause can keep up with the speed of its online obsolescence. The pressing moral issues of today become the undesirable and compromised positions of tomorrow”.

The obsessive process of reproducing this image opens a narrative that also questions the often- slippery veracity of online images and the notion of the after life of information in cyberspace. The man from the Internet is a contemporary death mask: with each click retrieving his image from data to the visible, we grant him a ghostly and eternal online life. The one hundred drawings mimic, in an imperfect way, this speed-fuelled research system where years of work are instantly surpassed by the rapidity of a click. The project also highlights a certain absurd aspect of this undertaking that associates the compulsiveness of the series to an institutionalized educational complex that uses repetition as a way to modify behaviour and enforce punishment.

The Man From The Internet exists between truth and fiction, where our reception of images of war originating both in news channels and from the entertainment industry questions the possibility of true political speech and action. It expresses both outrage at the senselessness of death in the service of any political cause and points to the futility of romanticising any freedom struggle via the channels of popular culture.

Massimo De Carlo presenta The Man From The Internet la prima mostra personale di Andra Ursut?a in Italia.

Le sculture, le installazioni e i disegni di Andra Ursut?a sono “catartici e dannati. Il lavoro di Ursut?a risuona di un senso di fatalismo. La sua opera e? animata dal fallimento e dalla follia e in ogni sua forma [...] e? attraversato da un umorismo scuro e da una tenera ironia, sempre avvolto da cinici giochi di parole” come dice Natalie Bell, co-curatrice della mostra Alps al New Museum of Contemporary Art di New York nel 2016.

The Man From The Internet e? un progetto che l’artista ha iniziato nel 2007 ed e? composto da una serie di cento disegni inchiostro su carta. In ognuno di essi l’artista ha riprodotto a mano un’immagine trovata su internet tra le pagine di un’ambigua testata giornalistica russa oggi chiusa. Tratta da una fonte di dubbia attendibilita?, l’immagine recuperata dall’artista e? una fotografia pixelata di un cadavere in decomposizione di un caduto negli scontri tra Russia e Cecenia degli anni ’90, forse parte della documentazione del ritrovamento di una fossa comune. L’equivocita? del sito, a meta? tra propaganda e giornalismo, rende impossibile determinare l’identita? di questo sconosciuto e la veridicita? delle circostanze della sua morte.

Le possibili interpretazioni politiche dell’immagine di questo cadavere sono cambiate nell’arco dei dieci anni della realizzazione del progetto. Il significato dei disegni infatti e? mutato insieme alla geopolitica del nostro mondo che ha visto passare il disfacimento dell’ex-Blocco Sovietico e le recenti crisi politiche e sociali in Medio Oriente o in Asia. Le immagini di guerra, a cui oggi piu? che mai siamo esposti tramite internet e gli smart phone, hanno convinto l’artista a riflettere sulla nostra relazione con l’attivismo politico. Come dice lei stessa: “Nessun impegno personale e umano per qualunque causa puo? tenere testa alla velocita? della sua stessa obsolescenza online. Le questioni morali urgenti di oggi diventano le posizioni imbarazzanti e compromettenti di domani”.

L’ossessivo processo di riproduzione di quest’immagine ci porta a riflettere sulla provenienza, spesso dubbia, delle immagini che vediamo online e anche sull’idea della vita delle informazioni nell’aldila? cibernetico. The Man From The Internet e? una maschera mortuaria contemporanea: con ogni click rendiamo l’immagine visibile trasformandola da codice a materiale visivo garantendo a quest’uomo una spettrale eppure eterna vita online. I cento disegni copiano in maniera imperfetta questo processo di ricerca velocissimo attraverso il quale anni di lavoro sono azzerati dalla rapidita? di un click. Il progetto evidenzia anche l’assurdita? della missione di Andra Ursut?a, che associa l’approccio compulsivo di questa serie di disegni alle penitenze scolastiche che usano la ripetizione per modificare il comportamento e come strumento di punizione.
The Man From The Internet esiste tra finzione e realta? in un limbo in cui la ricezione delle immagini di guerra che arrivano dai telegiornali e dall’industria dell’intrattenimento ci impedisce di valutare con lucidita? la possibilita? e l’autenticita? dell’azione e perfino del dialogo politico. The Man From The Internet e? un’espressione di rabbia per l'assurdita? della morte al servizio di ogni causa politica e per la futilita? del romanticismo delle lotte per la liberta? quando passano attraverso il filtro della cultura popolare.

ANDRA URSUT?A

Andra Ursut?a was born in Salonta in Romania in 1979. She lives and works in New York City.
Solo exhibitions include: Alps, New Museum, New York, USA (2016); Andra Ursut?a, ICA, Miami, USA (2015); Whites, Kunsthalle Basel, Basel, CH (2015); Hammer Projects: Andra Ursut?a, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, USA (2014); Andra Ursut?a, Palais De Tokyo, Paris, F (2014); Andra Ursut?a, CAPC Muse?e d'Art Contemporain, Bordeaux, F (2013). Andra Ursut?a has took part in group exhibitions at distinguished institutions and galleries, such as: La Terra Inquieta (The Restless Earth), La Triennale di Milano, Milan, I (2017); La Grande Madre, Palazzo Reale, Milan, I (2015); Inside, Palais de Tokyo, Paris, F (2015); One Torino: Shit and Die, curated by Maurizio Cattelan, Palazzo Cavour, Turin, I (2014); Body Languages, Saatchi Gallery, London, (2014); Expo 1, MoMA PS1, Long Island City, New York (2013); Ostalgia, New Museum, New York, USA (2012). Andra Ursut?a took part in the 55th Venice Biennale in 2013, The Encyclopaedic Palace, curated by Massimiliano Gioni.

 

 

Dan Colen
PURGATORY PAINTINGS

09 May – 14 July
Tuesday – Saturday
11am-7pm

Opening 08 May official opening from 6pm to 9pm

Palazzo Belgioioso
Piazza Belgioioso 2, 20121

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Massimo De Carlo is pleased to present Purgatory Paintings, a new exhibition by the American artist Dan Colen. The exhibition, which will take place in the Milan gallery in Piazza Belgioioso, will open to the public on the 9th of May 2017.

Throughout his practice Dan Colen has used the canvas as the medium to investigate the transcendental value of banality, encompassing fairy-tales and found objects to draft a narrative that elevates materiality itself by shifting between non-representational subjects and figurative ones.

The Purgatory Paintings are a continuation of the artist’s pursuit of placing art between the worlds of abstraction and representation. Each canvas, seen from a distance, looks like cloudscapes, however, as one’s body enters the close physical space of the canvas, the subject matter dissolves into a fog of formlessness and colour.

A skilful and thorough labour process is involved in the making of the Purgatory Paintings, where the end result is a painting comprised of myriad translucent layers – none of which reveal any hard edges or brushwork. Instead, paint in the Purgatory series behaves in much the same manner that clouds do themselves: a suspension of liquid aerosols so finely scattered as to appear like a formless gas one must squint to perceive.

The notion of purgatory can be applied to the paintings themselves, which are caught in the midst of an investigation of the painterly gesture, and to the subjects of the works: looking at the clouds in the paintings it is impossible to know whether a storm is breaking apart or just setting in, whether the sun is on its way up, or on its way down. Both time and space, then, are unresolvable, and the resulting works appropriately conflate nothingness with the infinite. Foregrounded shapes stand in stark contrast to a deeper atmosphere, confusing the gradations in between. Like Purgatory itself, one cannot perceive the distance out or discern whether there is no middle ground or only middle ground.

The exhibition, that marks Dan Colen’s return to Italy after six years, offers an insight into the way that we now experience nature and consciousness through hastily defined, synthetic filters allowing theatrical and cartoonish fantasy to become an ideal platform on which to stage the contemporary sublime.

 

Massimo De Carlo presenta Purgatory Paintings, una nuova mostra personale dell’artista americano Dan Colen negli spazi espositivi di Piazza Belgioioso a Milano.

Le opere di Dan Colen esplorano il valore trascendente della banalita?: l’artista utilizza la tela per costruire una narrativa popolata di objet trouve? ed elementi fiabeschi che eleva la materialita? del quotidiano attraverso rappresentazioni figurative e astratte.

La ricerca di Dan Colen cerca un equilibrio tra astrazione e rappresentazione: nella nuova serie Purgatory Paintings ogni tela vista da lontano puo? sembrare un cielo cosparso di nuvole ma, avvicinandosi, quelle che sembrano nuvole si dissolvono come una nebbia senza forma e colore.

Ogni Purgatory Painting nasce da un ossessivo processo che genera una moltitudine di strati traslucidi in cui si dissolvono le pennellate, la manualita? e il gesto dell’artista. In questi quadri la pittura sembra comportarsi in maniera autonoma come se copiasse l’andamento e la struttura proprio delle nuvole, si sospende finemente sulla tela come vapore acqueo e chiede allo spettatore di strizzare gli occhi per percepirne la forma.

La mostra di Dan Colen e? sospesa nel tempo e nello spazio: i dipinti catturano il momento d’investigazione del gesto pittorico e il movimento inafferrabile delle nuvole per esprimere l’indefinitezza mitica del Purgatorio. Osservando i cieli dipinti da Colen e? impossibile dire se stia per scoppiare un temporale o se la tempesta sia appena passata, se il sole stia per sorgere o per tramontare: le diverse gradazioni di colore delle pennellate dell’artista scandiscono il contrasto tra le forme in primo piano e la profondita? dello sfondo per fondere il nulla con l’infinito. Come in un Purgatorio immaginario lo spettatore non e? in grado di percepire le distanze e di capire se esista davvero una terra di mezzo o solamente la terra.

La mostra Purgatory Paintings segna il ritorno di Dan Colen in Italia dopo sei anni e offre una riflessione lucida sulla contemporaneita?. In un mondo in cui ogni immagine puo? essere trasformata e modificata grazie all’applicazione di filtri sintetici vivono i contrasti tra reale e virtuale e tra natura e finzione: il sublime va in scena sul palcoscenico di fantasie grottesche e teatrali.

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TV 70: Francesco Vezzoli guarda la Rai

09 May – 24 September
Mon / Wed / Thu: 10am- 8pm
Fri / Sat /Sun: 10am-9pm

Opening 08 May 7-9 pm

Fondazione Prada Milano
Largo Isarco 2, 20139

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“TV 70: Franscesco Vezzoli guarda la Rai” is a project by artist Francesco Vezzoli developed in collaboration with Rai, Italy’s national broadcasting company. In between individual experiences and collective narratives, the exhibition translates the artist’s gaze into a visual experience that explores 1970s TV production.

Italian public TV is interpreted by the artist as a driving force for social and political change in a country in transition from the radicalness of the 1960s to the hedonism of the 1980s, as well as a powerful machine for cultural and identity creation. During that decade, Rai revised its pedagogical mission and distinguished itself for the high cultural quality of its productions, such as the collaborations with film directors Bernardo Bertolucci, Federico Fellini, Paolo and Vittorio Taviani. Divided between formal austerity and experimental vocation, 1970s television amplified the development of collective imagination into a plurality of landscapes and individual perspectives, anticipating the narratives which characterized the commercial television of the following decade. TV became a specific medium, and its shows went through a progressive transformation: they first shifted from culture to information, and subsequently from information to communication.

“TV 70” has been conceived as a sequence of visual and semantic juxtapositions taking place in the Nord gallery, in the Podium and in the Sud gallery at Fondazione Prada. The design of the show, realized by M/M (Paris) – Mathias Augustyniak and Michael Amzalag – is based on the merging of spatial and temporal dimensions in a set-up which combines traditional museum exhibition standards with the screening of moving images, in alternating conditions of light and darkness. The sequence of immaterial documents from the Teche Rai archives combined with the materiality of paintings, sculptures and installations – selected thanks to the curatorial support of Cristiana Perrella and the scientific consultancy of Massimo Bernardini and Marco Senaldi – will develop in three separate sections, and analyze the relationships between Italian public television with visual art, politics and entertainment.

Satoshi Fujiwara
EU

07 June – 15 October
Monday – Friday, 2-8 pm
Sat – Sun, 10 am-8 pm

Opening 07 June

Fondazione Prada Osservatorio
Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II 63, 20121

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EU” is an anthological exhibition by Japanese photographer Satoshi Fujiwara presented at the Osservatorio in the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II in Milan. The show includes some of the most significant works by the artist long with “5K Confinement”, a commission realized for “Belligerent Eyes”, an experimental media research project on image production hosted at Fondazione Prada in Venice in Summer 2016.

Curated by Luigi Alberto Cippini in a set-up conceived by Armature globale, the exhibition offers an alternative to the representational regimes which have set the ground for the current “European photographic identity”. As stated by Cippini, “contemporary photographic production seems to be regulated by strict resolution, impact and distribution standards. An increasing number of freelance reporters daily documents social and political events within and on the edges of the European Union, producing images that, although free from any rigid classification standards, seem to be nonetheless subject to specific aesthetic, accessibility, spatial and content regimes. Such constraints allow and support the work of new generations of photographers, increasing the possibilities for their photos to be published yet contributing to the standardization of an average, neutral taste”.

Satoshi Fujiwara (Kobe, Japan, 1984), initiates a pressing and critical action on the gazer, through the focal length set from portrayed subjects and the heterogeneous definition of his photographs, diverting from the standards of photo-journalism and from an exclusively documentary dimension, thus producing a new emerging lexicon.

The exhibition is divided into two sections: the first, hosted on the lower level of Osservatorio, is a reconstruction of commission “5K Confinement”, whereas the upper floor hosts a retrospective which gathers works from a number of different series, such as “#R”(2015-ongoing), “THE FRIDAY: A report on a report” (2015), “Police Brutality” (2015), “Venus” (2016-ongoing), “Continent” (2017-ongoing), “Animal Material” (2016-ongoing), “Mayday” (2015), “Scanning”(2016) and “Green Helmet (2016).

Alejandro G. Iñárritu
CARNE y ARENA (Virtually Present, Physically Invisible)

07 June – 15 January
Mon / Wed / Thu, 10 am-8 pm
Fri / Sat / Sun, 10 am-9 pm

Opening 07 June 10am (bookings only)

Fondazione Prada Milano
Largo Isarco 2, 20139

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Alejandro G. Inarritu’s “CARNE y ARENA (Virtually Present, Physically Invisible),” a virtual reality installation produced by Legendary Entertainment and Fondazione Prada, will be presented in its extensive full version at Fondazione Prada in Milan from 7 June 2017 until 15 January 2018, after its world premiere in the 70th Festival de Cannes.

Based on true accounts, the superficial lines between subject and bystander are blurred and bound together, allowing individuals to walk in a vast space and thoroughly live a fragment of the refugees’ personal journeys. “CARNE y ARENA” employs the highest, never-before- used virtual technology to create a large, multi-narrative light space with human characters.

The experimental visual installation “CARNE y ARENA” is a six and half minute solo experience that reunites frequent collaborators Alejandro G. Inarritu and three-time Academy Award®-winning cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki alongside producer Mary Parent and ILMxLAB.

“During the past four years in which this project has been growing in my mind, I had the privilege of meeting and interviewing many Mexican and Central American refugees. Their life stories haunted me, so I invited some of them to collaborate with me in the project,” said four-time Academy Award-winner Inarritu. “My intention was to experiment with VR technology to explore the human condition in an attempt to break the dictatorship of the frame, within which things are just observed, and claim the space to allow the visitor to go through a direct experience walking in the immigrants’ feet, under their skin, and into their hearts.”

As stated by Germano Celant, Fondazione Prada’s Artistic and Scientific Superintendent, “with ‘CARNE y ARENA’, Inarritu turns the exchange between vision and experience into a process of osmosis in which the duality between the organic body and the artificial body is dissolved. A fusion of identities arises: a psychophysical unity in which, by crossing the threshold of the virtual, the human strays into the imaginary and vice versa. It is a revolution in communication in which seeing is transformed into feeling and into a physical engagement with cinema: a transition from the screen to the gaze of the human being, with a total immersion of the senses. Inarritu’s project perfectly embodies Fondazione Prada’s experimental vocation and its long-lasting engagement towards the correlation between cinema, technology and the arts.”

With the inclusion of “CARNE y ARENA” in the Official Selection, Inarritu continues his longstanding history with the Festival de Cannes, having premiered his first feature film, “Amores Perros,” the Critics Week Grand Prize winner, in 2000 and subsequently presented

“Babel,” for which he won the Best Director Award, in 2006, and “Biutiful” in 2010 as part of the Official Selection. Lubezki’s work has also appeared at Cannes in 2000’s “Things You Can Tell Just by Looking at Her,” which won the Un Certain Regard Prize, and in Terrence Malik’s Palme d’Or-winning “The Tree of Life” in 2011.

Access to the installation will only be available via online booking. More detailed info can be found at the following link: http://www.fondazioneprada.org/project/carne-y-arena

ABOUT LEGENDARY ENTERTAINMENT
Legendary Entertainment is a leading media company with film (Legendary Pictures), television and digital (Legendary Television and Digital Media) and comics (Legendary Comics) divisions dedicated to owning, producing and delivering content to worldwide audiences. Legendary has built a library of marquee media properties and has established itself as a trusted brand which consistently delivers high-quality, commercial entertainment including some of the world's most popular intellectual property.
www.legendary.com

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Salvatore Arancio
And These Crystals Are Just like Globes of Light

19 May – 15 July
Tuesday - Friday, 11 am - 7 pm
Saturday, 12 pm - 7 pm

Opening 18 May from 6pm

Via Barozzi 6, 20122

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Federica Schiavo Gallery is pleased to present And These Crystals Are Just like Globes of Light, the third solo show by Salvatore Arancio at the gallery.

The artist’s aim, through the use of a range of media such as ceramics, collage, prints and video, is to give the sensation of a compact and homogeneous concept regardless of the fact that his practice is paradoxically composed of contrasting elements. Each facet of his practice contains an intertwining juxtaposition of the roots and representation of images: natural and artificial, mineral and vegetable, two-dimensional and three-dimensional, scientific and mythological. Departing from their literal meaning, Arancio creates new juxtapositions that are both beautifully evocative and deeply disquieting.

The display of the first room revolves around a sculptural installation designed and produced by the artist for the Kunsthalle Winterthur in 2016. The leitmotif for this part of the exhibition is the fictional reading of the Cave of Giant Crystals (Cueva de los Cristales), the caverns located below the Naica Mine in Mexico, where there are the biggest natural crystals known on Earth. The cave inspired Arancio to an installation of individual ceramic works arranged on black resin surfaces and titled And These Crystals Are Just like Globes of Light.

While the Cave Of Giant Crystals became the source of inspiration for the works in the first room, in the next one the sculptural pieces are shaped by forms informed by the petrified trees of the “Lava Trees State Park” in the Hawaii Island, that preserves lava moulds of the tree trunks that were formed after a volcanic eruption in 1790. By using a natural material like clay to recreate the lava trees’ totemic presence and by toning the resulting shapes with iridescent, metallic glazes, the artist’s aim is to create a link to his on going fascination about nature as a theatre for rituals, worships and self-induced trance states.

The sculptures in the second room have been produced in 2017 in collaboration with the ancient Ceramica Gatti in Faenza together with the project for La Biennale di Venezia 2017.

In all the sculptures in the show, Arancio doesn’t hesitate to convene science and make apparent their mystical side decontextualizing the forms that have inspired him and emphasize the strangeness and the evocative power of these natural elements that may recall phallic symbols and esoteric signs. A “strange temporality” will emerge by visiting the show, where you’re not exactly sure where you might be, or when.

 

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Lorenza Longhi
Today Is Not That Great

28 May – 16 July
Saturday - Sunday
15-19 or by appointment

Opening 27 May 6pm

Via Merano 21, 20127

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Hello Lore, how are you?

I would pass all the night talking to you in a big bed with flowers and candles and amazing food raining from the ceiling. OH well, maybe that would be a scary scene, us trying not to be burnt by raining candles because we would be all oiled by the fat food. Well, that sounds more like a medieval torture than a romantic dream. It’s funny how I can turn a soft romantic scenario into something awkwardly tragic, but maybe that’s a way not to be ever bored - or beaten up by reality.

I’m thinking a lot about boredom - in fact I keep distorting all what happens in my mind while it happens trying not to be a victim of it.

I keep reading everywhere these kind of quotation from successful people who says “one is never bored unless he’s boring” or “blablabla bored is who boring is”- Like now, these phrases do not exist, i’m just inventing them to explain my point, but i’m deeply convinced they’re real, maybe they just come from something real that I actually read but that’s my version. I see that is a distorted version of “haters gonna hate”, something like that.

Boredom happens so sweetly, and sweet things are the worst.
Like raining flowers, candles and food: they seem nice when you’re at the surface of the thought but when it opens up to you as a real possibility, as something that may be a physical phenomenon, then it’s just an horrible torture.

I’m fighting against it, boredom I mean, i’m refusing to feel bored and the result is just an hysteric version of me walking around doing random stuff one after the other, talking crazily to people, drinking coffee eating chocolate...i mean it’s not that bad when fighting boredom implies looking a little dissociated while living the everyday life, or is it?

That’s why maybe we all end up acting, picking up a role for ourselves. Rules and roles help because it’s all about people:

People are obsessed with people... people love people but people don’t really like people.
Flirting, hating, striving...
But where does lies the line between love and obsession?

i don’t know, but i fell that borders need to be crossed!

You should put a structure in the space, made of iron and glass, that reminds a huge window or a Japanese Shoji. Maybe something in between a set prop, a Rolls Royce’s shop window in Monte Carlo and a normal big window... uhm the windows are a building’s eyes but... but also... if they’re in a office they’re fake walls because they don’t really hide...

To be reactionary and just wait without taking part in this game is no more allowed even if it’s comfortable, and you see how comfort is comfortable!
You know how, it’s a disaster to be comfortable!
It’s like when you meet a business man with a punk past, you can see it and he does not regret it but he acts as if the detail that is a bit off on his jacket was made by a crazy punk he met that tried to ruin his suit. But I don’t decide, it’s up to you. Because we don’t know...if people are obsessed with people, days are evils or they are sweets but Today is great! (i really hope that)!

Bye

xx R.

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Simon Fujiwara
Heaven

31 May – 30 September
Monday – Friday
11 am-7 pm

Opening 30 May 6-9 pm

Via A. Tadino 20, 20124

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Heaven

I know not of the reason
Why I’m so sad at heart.
A tale of bygone ages
Haunts me and won’t depart.
 
The air is cool at nightfall
The Rhine courses its way.
The mountain’s peak does sparkle
With evening’s final ray.
 
The fairest of the maidens
So marvelous up there,
Her golden jewels are shining,
She combs her golden hair.
 
And with her comb so golden,
she sings a song as well
Whose melody is binding
And overpowering spell.
 
Now in his boat, the boatman
Is seized with savage woe,
He looks up at the mountain
And shuns the rocks below.
 
So when the waves devour
The boat and man as one;
She sings her final words tonight;
“Fair Lorelei is done”

Adapted from a poem by Heinrich Heine, 1822

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Bea Schlingelhoff
Auftrag

31 May – 01 July
Monday – Friday 10.30 am - 5.30 pm
Saturday 2 - 6 pm

Opening 30 May from 6.30 pm

Via del Vecchio Politecnico 3, 20121

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Invitare Bea Schlingelhoff a presentare il suo progetto all’Istituto Svizzero a Milano significa dare a questa artista impegnata, insegnante alla ZHdK e all'ECAL, l’opportunità di mostrare come la posizione dell’artista nel mondo riveli i campi di forza che strutturano la nostra società contemporanea.

Samuel Gross, head curator ISR

“Delle regole della Guardia Svizzera Pontificia fa parte un sistema di punizioni.
Chi infrange le regole deve tagliare uniformi dismesse.”
  “Soldiers of the Pope”, Felice Zenoni, 2006

Il termine “Auftrag” in tedesco significa “incarico”, “ordine”, ma anche “applicazione”. Può essere usato tanto per indicare la stesura del colore che per indicare l’incarico di svolgere un servizio o produrre qualcosa. Il Papa Giulio II, fondatore della Guardia Svizzera Pontificia nel 1506, oltre che a due canonici pittori maschi, diede incarico a pittrici rinascimentali donne e clandestine di applicare strati di pittura alle pareti degli edifici in Vaticano.

La Guardia Svizzera, un corpo di mercenari, dunque non soggetti all’obbligo di vestire l’uniforme tipica della loro appartenenza nazionale, è vestita dei colori del capitale secolare e del potere: l’azzurro carico, il rosso e il giallo dello stemma dei Medici.

C’è un legame tra l’incarico a un’artista, quello a un soldato e quello a una donna che lavora. Che si agisca per un mercato dell’arte, uno stato nazionale o nel contesto del patriarcato, le condizioni dello scontro sono definite e affermate vigorosamente dall’esterno.

Fino all'abolizione del patriarcato, il lavoro delle donne deve essere considerato pure lavoro mercenario?

Burke/Tuazon/Schlingelhoff

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Rose Wylie
Yellow Sax

01 June – 09 September
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am-7pm (close 1-2.30 pm)

Opening 31 May From 7pm to 9pm

Via C. Farini 32, 20159

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Brand New Gallery is pleased to present “Yellow Sax” Rose Wylie’s first solo exhibition in Italy. On view three large-scale paintings: “Black Stork” (2012), as well as two recent works “A Musician From Margate, Seagulls” (2017) and “A Musician From Margate, Shamrock” (2017); that together underscore the artist’s distinctive working process and intuitive approach to image-making. Wylie creates paintings that on first glance appear aesthetically simplistic, not seeming to align with any recognizable style or movement, but on closer inspection are revealed to be wittily observed and subtly sophisticated mediations on the nature of visual representation itself. Rose Wylie finds inspiration from a wide range of visual culture: from film to fashion photography, from literature to mythology, from news images to sports, and from individuals she meets in her day-to-day life. The artist paints colorful and exuberant compositions that are uniquely recognizable. Often working from memory, she distils her subjects into succinct observations, using text to give additional emphasis to her recollections. Rose Wylie’s paintings offer a direct and wry commentary on contemporary culture.

José Lerma
The Last Upper

01 June – 09 September
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am-7pm (close 1-2.30 pm)

Opening 31 May From 7pm to 9pm

Via C. Farini 32, 20159

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Brand New Gallery is pleased to present “The Last Upper”, José Lerma’s first solo exhibition at the gallery. The show will feature a group of paintings from Lerma’s most recent body of work. Born in Spain in 1971 and raised in Puerto Rico, José Lerma draws inspiration from his personal history, as well as historical figures and events, claiming that “all art is about other art and about your parents”. Lerma explores conceptually and materially the medium of painting, recognizing it as a medium that, historically, has often been a vehicle for commemorating status and power. “Portraiture has traditionally been a way to depicting status... The portraits were idealized, even theatrical… They were instruments. Images serve that function” Power remains a recurrent theme for Lerma, who had a background in social science and he studied law before taking a hard left turn to pursue contemporary high-concept art. Neither critical nor celebratory, Lerma’s approach to his subject matter exposes paradoxes ranging from the site and context to his projects to the medium of painting itself. Using varying methods and alternative materials, Lerma’s gestures and depictions continue to unfold upon investigation, his compositions are at one abstract and figurative, humorous and dark, chaotic and controlled, encouraging a deeper engagement with the content and narrative embedded in the work.

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Jacopo Miliani
Male Male Malen

01 June – 28 June
Monday – Friday
10am-6pm (closed 1-2 pm)

Opening 31 May from 7pm to 9pm

Via privata Rezia 2, 20135

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Performance: May 31st, 7 pm - Marselleria via Paullo, 12/A - Milano
Exhibition preview: May 31st, 4 - 7 pm - Marselleria via privata Rezia, 2 - Milano

Marselleria presents Male Male Malen, solo exhibition by Jacopo Miliani, that will take place in the venue of via privata Rezia 2 from June 1st to June 28th. The exhibition will be launched through a performance on May 31st in the venue of via Paullo 12/A, from 7 pm.

“Pittura maschio maschio.”

Remember those walls I built? Well, baby they're tumbling down they didn't even put up a fight. They didn't even make a sound.

“Lieber Maler” (Dear Painter)... a German painter said ... “Male Mir” (Paint for me)... Bringing painting to be not only a medium connected with looking, but also a gesture.

Jacopo Miliani’s show attempts to translate a personal universe through the painting medium, which has been taken on by the artist for the first time, with big irony.

In the exhibition, the body is at the centre of the representation: a carnivalesque explosion that, instead of masking itself, reveals its intimacy. Maybe, this is the proper role of the make-up and the mask. Movements and gestures, whose documentation is included inside the artwork itself, activate different elements of abstract, monochrome and also figurative painting.

Melancholic and absurd figures (mime, Pierrot, geisha), collide with childish memories creating a half-serious aura, connected with the exhibition environment. In the show there are different collaborations with performers and artists, including Miliani’s mother: Antonietta Federici Miliani, whose pictorial style counterpoises and challenges the conceptual feature of her son.

The show reveals painting not only as external surface, but also as a game that contains an emotional dimension, where you could mirror yourself or where a new face will be revealed.

Between order and disorder, there is a chaos that brings forth several questions. Starting with the title of the show: “Male Male Malen” is translated by Google Translator as “Pittura Maschio Maschio” (from Italian Male Male Painting). But also in many other different ways... It depends on the selected languages.

Which is the relationship among translation, painting and manhood representation?

Exhibition texts by: Joa?o Moura?o and Luis Silva, Francesco Urbano Ragazzi and Sara Giannini

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Alice Visentin
PRIMA PERSONA SINGOLARE

07 June – 07 July
Open only by appointment

Opening 06 June From 7pm

Via Garian 64, 20146

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TILE Project Space è lieta di presentare Prima persona singolare di Alice Visentin, mostra che racchiude una selezione dei dipinti realizzati dall’artista nel corso dell’ultimo anno.

Alice Visentin sviluppa la sua pratica artistica attraverso un uso esclusivo della pittura intrapreso in una ricerca quotidiana sul medium. L’artista compone le proprie giornate in modo semplice: frequenta assiduamente il suo studio dove può dipingere all'aperto circondata dalla natura incolta del lungo Dora torinese, incontra il suo gruppo di amici le cui pratiche singolari si sono trasformate in un’esperienza condivisa di sensibilità e metodo di lavoro. L’attitudine al semplice ha dato forma ad un carattere artistico preciso che si esprime in una pittura tonale, priva di sfumature e ornamenti, così come nella scelta delle figure rappresentate: soggetti algidi, dai visi imperturbati e fieri, attraversati da porzioni di natura. 

Influenzata dal concetto di equilibrio e purezza interiore della filosofia classica, insieme a quella sensibilità che in diverse epoche storiche riporta l’uomo a riconsiderarsi in comunione con la natura, l’artista ritrova nel concetto di ‘equanimità’ il punto più alto della saggezza umana. Caratterizzato da equilibrio e estraniazione dai turbamenti esteriori, l’equanime fa della sua integrità – non riassumibile unicamente sotto le categorie morali – la postura con cui costruire ogni attimo della vita senza farsi travolgere. Imitando la bellezza in natura, la sua semplicità di forme che nasconde la complessità del suo tessuto interno, l’uomo crea un’architettura dello spirito che lo rende capace di un’empatia con l’ambiente. 

In opposizione alla vita mediata dal digitale, la pittura di Alice Visentin ricompone un linguaggio materiale i cui soggetti e i tratti sono stimolati dall’osservazione spontanea del mondo, dallo stupore e dalla sua meraviglia.

 

La mostra si conclude con il finissage ospitato nello studio dell’artista a Torino, dove verrà presentata la Tilezine del progetto.

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Piero Golia

12 June – 14 July

Opening 12 June from 6.30 pm to 9.30

Piazza Vetra 21, 20123

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Jaya Howey
Splendor in the Commons

23 June – 29 July
Friday - Saturday
3pm - 7pm or by appointment

Opening 22 June From 6.30pm

Via Privata Don Bartolomeo Grazioli 73, 20161

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For “Splendor in the Commons” Jaya Howey presents a new group of “Seating/Arrangement” works which the artist began producing in 2016. 

Employing the simple format of the wooden bench to serve as an armature upon which arranges various upholstered cushions and customized fabrics, Howey considers the notion of shared space and its broader social implications.

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"Pascali Sciamano"
Curated by Francesco Stocchi

24 March – 24 June
Monday – Friday by appointment | Saturday free entry
11 am-6 pm

Opening 30 November

Via Cino del Duca, 4, 20122

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The exhibition, aims to present the work of Pino Pascali (Bari, 1935 – Rome, 1968) in dialogue with what is commonly called “tribal art.” It allows visitors to explore the artist’s creative approach through his bond with African culture, beginning from his interest in primitivism as opposed to the myths of modern society and attention to totemism, the phenomena of animal/individual, and the animistic notion of nature. 
In fact, there are many synergies between tribal art and the poetics of Pino Pascali—an eclectic figure, sculptor, set designer, performer, and key player on the Italian art scene in the 1960s—who finds in African creative forms an inexhaustible source of inspiration in an attempt to open his practice up to a magical, fantastical, playful, and ambiguous dimension. The representation of stylized nature limited to its essential elements, the myth of primitivism, the use of the body as an extension of the work/object, the relationship between individual and collectivity, and the coexistence between the natural and the artificial characterize the investigations of Pascali, who stages but does not sublime Africa. He moves beyond sculptural essentiality and the study of figures in an attempt to restore that primordial harmony obfuscated by the prevailing intellectualism of the age while using matter as a tool of knowledge and a mythical invocation of life elements. 
In primitive societies, a shaman is a person who acts poised between two worlds—here and beyond—in a dialogue with the forces of nature and expresses himself through mythical symbolism that cannot be traced back to categories of ideas and logical truths. Acknowledging life outside man and transforming each behavior into a language is what unites Pascali to the rituals and myths of primitive cultures. PASCALI SCIAMANO is a surprising exploration through the career of Pascali between 1966 and 1968 that will allow visitors to discover less known works, some of which have never been shown previously. 
The itinerary interacts with the architecture, avoiding any direct confrontation between African works and the artist’s sculptures, but instead intimately relates his creations, almost as if evoking a free narration. The exhibition unfolds across the Foundation’s three floors, each of which is dedicated to one of the three years (1966/1967/1968) of his brief yet prolific career.

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