Galleries & Museums

Galleries & Museums
15 Marsèlleria
10 Pirelli HangarBicocca
9 Fanta Spazio
20 Fondazione Prada
4 Fondazione Carriero
21 Galleria Lia Rumma
23 La Triennale
11 Istituto Svizzero
14 Gió Marconi
25 ZERO...
3 Cardi Gallery
22 Tile Project Space
7 Massimo De Carlo
18 Francesca Minini
5 Galleria Raffaella Cortese
13 Lisson Gallery
12 kaufmann repetto
2 Brand New Gallery
1 Armada
6 Monica De Cardenas
17 miart
19 Peep-Hole
24 Fondazione Nicola Trussardi
8 Le Dictateur
16 Mega
Galleries & Museums
Marsèlleria

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Pirelli HangarBicocca

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Pirelli HangarBicocca

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Pirelli HangarBicocca

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Fanta Spazio

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Fondazione Prada

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Fondazione Prada

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Fondazione Carriero

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Galleria Lia Rumma

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La Triennale

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Istituto Svizzero

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Gió Marconi

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ZERO...

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Cardi Gallery

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Tile Project Space

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Massimo De Carlo

Via Ventura 5 e Palazzo Belgioioso, Piazza Belgioioso 2 - Milano Italy ,

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Francesca Minini

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Galleria Raffaella Cortese

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Lisson Gallery

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kaufmann repetto

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Brand New Gallery

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Brand New Gallery

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Armada

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Monica De Cardenas

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Gió Marconi

Via A. Tadino 20, 20124

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kaufmann repetto

Via di Porta Tenaglia 7, 20121

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Galleria Raffaella Cortese

Via A. Stradella 1, 4, 7, 20129

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Brand New Gallery

Via C. Farini 32, 20159

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Cardi Gallery

Corso di Porta Nuova 38, 20121

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Monica De Cardenas

Via F. Viganò 4, 20124

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Massimo De Carlo

Via G. Ventura 5 / Palazzo Belgioioso, Piazza Belgioioso 2,

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Pirelli HangarBicocca

Via Chiese 2, 20126

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Istituto Svizzero

Via del Vecchio Politecnico 3, 20121

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Lisson Gallery

Via B. Zenale 3, 20123

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miart

Viale L. Scarampo, 20149

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Francesca Minini

Via Massimiano 25, 20134

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Galleria Lia Rumma

Via Stilicone 19, 20154

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La Triennale

Viale E. Alemagna 6, 20121

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ZERO...

Viale Premuda 46, 20129

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Marsèlleria

Via Paullo 12/A / Via privata Rezia 2, 20135

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Fondazione Nicola Trussardi

Piazza E. Duse 4, 20122

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Fondazione Prada

Largo Isarco 2, 20139

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Fondazione Carriero

Via Cino del Duca, 4, 20122

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Fanta Spazio

Via Merano 21, 20127

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Tile Project Space

Via Garian 64, 20146

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Armada

Via Privata Don Bartolomeo Grazioli 73, 20161

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Mega

Piazza Vetra 21, 20123

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10 Corso Como

Corso Como 10 - 20154

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Bar Basso

Via Plinio 39 - 20129

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La Belle Aurore

Via Privata G. Abamonti 1 - 20129

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Fioraio Bianchi Caffè

Via Montebello 7 - 20121

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Carminio

Via Del Carmine 3 - 20121

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Carpaccio

Via L. Palazzi 19 - 20124

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Charmant

Via G. Colombo 42 - 20133

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Grand Hotel et de Milan

Via A. Manzoni 29 - 20121

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Lile in cucina

Via F. Guicciardini 5 - 20129

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Panificio Davide Longoni

Via G. Tiraboschi 19 - 20135

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Pasticceria Marchesi

Via Santa Maria alla Porta 11a - 20123

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Trattoria Masuelli San Marco

Viale Umbria 80 - 20135

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La Nuova Arena

Piazza Lega Lombarda 5 - 20154

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Pavé

Via F. Casati 27 - 20124

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Antica Trattoria della Pesa

Viale Pasubio 10 - 20154

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Picchio

Via Melzo 11 - 20129

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Piero e Pia

Piazza D. Aspari 2 - 20129

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Polpetta DOC

Via B. Eustachi 8 - 20129

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Vivaio Riva

Via Arena 7 - 20123

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Osteria del Treno

Via San Gregorio 46 - 20124

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Violette

Via P. Castaldi 14 - 20124 

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Fonderia Artistica Battaglia

Via Stilicone 10 - 20154

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Mandarin Oriental

Via Andegari 9 - 20121

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Pasticceria Cucchi

Corso Genova 1 - 20123

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Otto

Via Paolo Sarpi 10 - 20154

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DRY Cocktails & Pizza

Via Solferino 33 - 20121

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Capetown Café

Via Vigevano 3 - 20144

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Pisacco

Via Solferino 48 - 20121

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Paola Angelini
"What is Orange? Why, an Orange, Just an Orange!"

28 September – 28 October
Monday – Friday
10am-6pm

Opening 28 September from 7pm to 9pm

Via Paullo 12/A / Via privata Rezia 2, 20135

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The exhibition features a selection of large and small paintings, created during a residency at NDK (Nordisk Kunstnarsenter Dale), on the Norwegian fjords.
The series takes its cue from another work produced during the residency, La storia raccontata da mio padre. In the canvas the different stages of a story - shared in a private setting – coexist on the same plane in a coherent pictorial style.

Conversely, the canvases from the series What is orange? Why, an Orange, Just an Orange!, only leave room for the objects represented. The new paintings thus become still lifes or compositions, in which La storia raccontata da mio padre lingers on the background. They leave aside every committment to narrative representation and, by selecting and deleting single elements, they let the subjects emerge with levity. Far from being a symptom of carelessness, this process appears as the only possible approach to continue a research consisting of marks, drawings, matter on canvas.

The common trait in the series is the colour orange – but it could have been blue or pink – that creates the necessary suspension to extend this exercise of removal.

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Osgemeos
Efêmero. Curated by Cedar Lewisohn

21 April – 23 April
Thursday – Sunday
10 am-10 pm

Opening 20 April

Via Chiese 2, 20126

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Pirelli HangarBicocca presents the new public mural, Efêmero, the first large-scale mural in Italy by OSGEMEOS, who are among the world’s most renowned contemporary artists. This work on the outer walls of Pirelli HangarBicocca, to be inaugurated on April 20, 2016, is part of the new three-year project “Outside the Cube," which will involve innovative new approaches to art in public space and a rich calendar of parallel events. The industrial site of Pirelli HangarBicocca, where in the last century trains were made, will become the ideal setting for the work of OSGEMEOS and the many artists to follow.

The project at Pirelli HangarBicocca will delve deeper into the artist’s unique universe of mysterious symbolism and alternative realities. OSGEMEOS’s works often huge in scale, matched with its distinctive patterns and colour schemes, referencing the natural world and improvisation of Sao Paulo. The project will explore the history and spectacular architectural setting of Pirelli HangarBicocca, using the site as a starting point for an iconic new production. The mural will not only be painted on the buildings facade but be incorporated into the buildings architecture. This is an ongoing theme in the artists work, to create murals that transform the facade of a building into a new structure. The project will be accompanied by a limited edition catalogue designed by the artists. The book will explore further the artists history of architectural interventions and include images of their works that have repurposed the built environment.

Curated by artist and writer Cedar Lewisohn - who has authored many publications on art, and curated the exhibition “Street Art at Tate Modern” in 2008 - the project by OSGEMEOS will occupy the two outer walls of Pirelli HangarBicocca’s Cubo space, covering a total area of a thousand square meters. It will also be visible from the nearby train tracks and from the street.

OSGEMEOS, literally meaning “the twins,” is the pseudonym of Brazilian twin brothers Gustavo and Otavio Pandolfo (b. 1974 in Sao Paulo). This artistic duo, whose roots are in hip-hop culture and graffiti, began in the 1980s to develop a highly sophisticated oeuvre recognizable for its dreamlike landscapes and poetic figures, drawing on a vast range of cultural, social and political references.

Kishio Suga “Situations”
curated by Yuko Hasegawa and Vicente Todolí

29 September – 29 January
Thursday – Sunday
10 am-10 pm

Opening 29 September from 7 pm

Via Chiese 2, 20126

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For the first time in the career of this pivotal figure in contemporary Japanese art, over twenty of his installations, dating from 1969 to the present, will be shown together in a single exhibition space. The exhibition is part of events celebrating the 150th anniversary of relations between Japan and Italy.

Suga was among the prime movers of Mono-ha, a current that enriched the contemporary art scene from the late 1960s on. In 1978, he was chosen to represent Japan at the Venice Biennale, introducing the West to an artistic language in which the investigation of materials and space is rooted in a deep affinity to nature and the environment.

“Situations” brings together a series of pieces the artist has adapted to the industrial architecture of Pirelli HangarBicocca. Forging an intense relationship with the vast spaces of the Navate, it unfolds along a single path that balances lightness and gravity, linearity and tension, solidity and intangibility. In keeping with his practice, Suga’s works are presented here as temporary projects which exist for the duration of the show, site-specific in both a spatial and temporal sense.

The exhibition highlights the common threads and experimental nature of the artist’s oeuvre, presenting a landscape of organic and industrial elements—iron, zinc, wood, stone, and paraffin—materials which he often finds on site. At Pirelli HangarBicocca, the pieces therefore take on new qualities and characteristics that differ from previous versions.

“I constructed installation pieces, a format that has become quite common today, inside galleries. I bring a variety of things into the gallery, arranging them and giving them structure so that they occupy the entire space. The installations are never permanent and can be quickly disassembled or demolished. One might say that I create temporary worlds.” (Kishio Suga, The Conditions Surrounding an Act, 2009)

The exhibition reflects on the historical importance of Suga’s paradigmatic practice— which developed in a period of intense international experimentation in the 1960s and 1970s, marked by movements like Postminimalism and Land Art in the United States and Arte Povera in Italy—while capturing the unique, contemporary nature of the artist’s thought.

In addition to the exhibition at Pirelli HangarBicocca, two other important institutions are paying homage to Kishio Suga in 2016: the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh is presenting the two-artist exhibition “Karla Black and Kishio Suga: A New Order” curated by Julie-Ann Delaney and Simon Groom (October 22, 2016 – February 19, 2017) and Dia Art Foundation is holding a solo show at Dia: Chelsea in New York City curated by Jessica Morgan and Alexis Lowry (November 5, 2016 – June 30, 2017).

After graduating from the painting department of Tama Art University in Tokyo in 1968 and working as a studio assistant for American artist Sam Francis, Kishio Suga began making and showing his work at a time of great artistic ferment in Japan. The years between 1969 and 1972 witnessed the emergence and growth of Mono-ha, a movement that also included Ko?ji Enokura, Noriyuki Haraguchi, Shingo Honda, Susumu Koshimizu, Lee Ufan, Katsushiko Narita, Nobuo Sekine, Noburu Takayama, and Katsuro Yoshida. Although the term Mono-ha literally translates as “School of Things,” the artists were neither an organized group, nor were their individual practices exclusively focused on things or objects. Their diverse work was united by the choice to use simple materials (both natural and industrially manufactured) as a means to explore the relationships between the individual, matter and surrounding space. Their works were often the result of direct, interactive actions, such as suspending, dropping, breaking and stacking. Mono-ha is therefore centered on both the material properties and the performative dimension of the artwork. These thematic and formal aspects can be seen as having a resonance with the Italian movement of Arte Povera.

A connection to Italy also emerges from the many exhibitions on Mono-ha held in this country. Over several decades, works from the movement have been featured at various Italian institutions, in shows such as “Mono-ha: La scuola delle cose” at Museo Laboratorio di Arte Contemporanea, Rome, in 1988; “Avanguardie Giapponesi degli anni 70” at Galleria Comunale d’Arte Moderna, Bologna, in 1992; “ASIANA: Contemporary Art from the Far East” at Palazzo Vendramin Calergi, Venice, in 1995; “Prima Materia” at Punta della Dogana, Venice, in 2013, and most recently, “Mono-ha” at Fondazione Mudima, Milan, in 2015.

The exhibition opens with a hanging installation, Critical Sections, reconstructed for the first time since 1984. Black and white strips of fabric, dangling from the ceiling from over twenty meters above, have been interwoven by the artist with branches found on site, and connected to zinc plates laid out on the floor below. Through a process of tension and release, the artist creates what he calls a “situation,” highlighting the existential links between the materials in the work and the space around it. Laid out along the side aisles are installations such as Continuous Existence—HB, 1977/2016, and Infinite Situation III (Door), 1970/2016, where Suga explores the relationship between the floor and walls, interior and exterior, using materials such as branches, rope and a wood beam. The artist’s practice assigns a central role to the concept of “interdependence" among different materials as a way of creating a single entity. This allows the visitor to observe the surroundings in their entirety, while perceiving the intangible spaces generated by the presence of the artworks, or “invisible” ones like the corners of rooms. Other works investigate the physical characteristics of their materials, like Parallel Strata, 1969/2016, made entirely from layered blocks of paraffin, or Soft Concrete, 1970/2016, composed of cement, gravel and sheet metal.

The Cubo space is rendered inaccessible to the public by Left-Behind Situation, 1972/2016. This work, reconstructed in its largest version to date, is made up of a single length of industrial wire stretched across two levels of the space, connecting different points on the four walls and horizontally creating diagonal intersections on which blocks of stone and wood rest in precarious balance.

Outside, visitors can contemplate Unfolding Field, 1972/2016, an installation of bamboo poles placed on structures made from cement and lightweight cables: a work that highlights the importance of open-air, natural elements in Suga’s practice.

Laure Prouvost

18 October – 09 April
Thursday – Sunday
10 am-10 pm

Opening 18 October from 7 pm

Via Chiese 2, 20126

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Roberto Fassone
“Charades”

08 October – 20 November
Saturday - Sunday
15-19 or by appointment

Opening 08 October 5 pm

Via Merano 21, 20127

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“Charades”, Roberto Fassone’s solo exhibition, is the result of a performance that took place at Fanta Spazio. Eight collectors were invited to participate to a game organized by the artist, whose content was a selection of contemporary artworks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Kienholz "Five Car Stud"
curated by Germano Celant

19 May – 31 December
Mon / Wed / Thu, 10 am-7 pm
Fri / Sat / Sun, 10 am-9 pm

Opening 19 May from 7pm to 9pm

Largo Isarco 2, 20139

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The exhibition brings together a selection of artworks by Edward Kienholz and Nancy Reddin Kienholz, including the well-known installation that gives the show its title.

Five Car Stud was created by Edward Kienholz from 1969 to 1972, and first exhibited at documenta 5 in Kassel, curated by Harald Szeemann. A life-sized reproduction of a scene of racial violence, Five Car Stud is considered one of the American artist’s most significant works. Despite the controversy and attention that it earned from critics right from its debut, the piece remained hidden from view in the storage of a Japanese collector for almost forty years. The artwork was only presented once again to the viewing public in 2011 and 2012 following restoration, first at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and then at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art in Denmark. Today the artwork is part of the Prada Collection, and is being shown for the first time ever in Italy as part of this exhibition, where it forms the central nucleus of an exhibition path that runs from the Sud gallery to the Deposito, and extends into an external space, presenting 25 artworks including sculpture, assemblages and tableaux realized by the Kienholzes from 1959 to 1994, as well as documentation material on the history and making of Five Car Stud.

Defined by Kienholz as the representation of the “burden of being an American,” Five Car Stud recreates a dark, isolated environment, illuminated merely by the headlights of four automobiles and a pickup truck. At the center of the scene lies an African-American, knocked to the ground and surrounded by five white men wearing Halloween masks. The aggressors hold him, grabbing his arms and legs, while one of them prepares to castrate him. There is also a sixth masked man holding a shotgun in vigil, while a white woman who had been on a date with the victim is now forced to watch, shocked and powerless, as the white attackers inflict their punishment. A frightened boy, the young son of one of the perpetrators, also witnesses the scene from the passenger seat of his father’s car. The black figure has a double face: an internal face in wax expressing sadness and resignation, and a transparent external face that displays a monstrous grimace of terror and rage. The torso, however, is built out of an oil pan inside of which six letters float, which might form the word “nigger.”

Five Car Stud catapults the viewer into a nightmarish situation, immersing him and her in a dimension – either removed or forgotten– of extreme violence. More than forty years after it was first created, the artwork’s expressive force, its powerful symbolic charge and the lucidity of the accusation against racial persecution retain their original strength.

William N. Copley

19 October – 08 January
Mon / Wed / Thu, 10 am-7 pm
Fri / Sat / Sun, 10 am-9 pm

Opening 19 October from 7pm to 9pm

Largo Isarco 2, 20139

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"Fasi Lunari"
Albert Oehlen with Peppi Bottrop, Andreas Breunig, Max Frintrop, Fabian Ginsberg, Yuji Nagai, David Ostrowski. Curated by Albert Oehlen and Francesco Stocchi

26 October – 04 February
Monday – Friday by appointment | Saturday free entry
11 am-6 pm

Opening 26 October from 7pm

Via Cino del Duca, 4, 20122

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The exhibition "Fasi lunari" gathers together the works of the artist Albert Oehlen (Krefeld, 1954) and six young artists, of his former students: Peppi Bottrop, Andreas Breunig, Max Frintrop, Fabian Ginsberg, Yuji Nagai, and David Ostrowski. It is curated by Francesco Stocchi with Albert Oehlen himself.

By presenting around thirty works, this exhibition intends to explore the distinguishing features of this German artist’s influence, overlapping it with the works of his former students.

The show is an overview exclusively devoted to painting, unfolding almost like the story of an intense creative exchange born at the Kunstakademie in Du?sseldorf, where the artist taught from 2000 to 2009. Oehlen has followed his students over the years, even beyond his role as their professor. He has continued to support them in their growth as artists and has befriended them even after their art academy days.

The title Fasi lunari (Lunar Phases) narrates the constant unfolding of the exhibition, a growing intensity by comparing the works, thanks also to the installation and a critical interpretation of the venue.

For the first time, the artist and his students come together to give life to a creative comparison in a non- hierarchical exhibition that treats the work of Oehlen and the young artists on equal footing, thereby rendering the creative energy typical of an exchange like this, but without any paternal connotation.

Fasi lunari stages a kind of fairy tale, the outcome and surpassing of the follower-master, student-teacher relationship. The itinerary guides visitors along a two-fold exploration: on the one hand, there is the work of one of Germany’s most acclaimed contemporary artists who challenges his own characteristic style, while on the other hand, there are the works of his students who, as a whole, give life to an exchange between the outcome of their studies and the art of their teacher.

A desire to undermine all expectations has always inspired Oehlen to change his work by constantly investigating painting and its expressive potentials. His previous certainties, which he views as dangerous pitfalls, are—for Oehlen—to be eliminated. His incessantly evolving works question the sense of contemporary painting while striving to go beyond all limits.

His research as an artist has been consistently accompanied by the willingness to challenge himself through a series of self-imposed rules—limits on structure and color or a deliberate slow-down in his work pace— aimed at stimulating his talent while guiding him towards unexpected creative solutions.

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Reinhard Mucha
"Schneller werden ohne Zeitverlust"

27 October – 22 December
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am-7 pm (closed 1.30-2.30 pm)

Opening 27 October from 6.30pm to 9pm

Via Stilicone 19, 20154

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Marc Camille Chaimowicz. Maybe Metafisica
curated by Eva Fabbris, with the artistic direction of Edoardo Bonaspetti

13 October – 08 January
Tuesday – Sunday 10.30 am-8.30 pm
Thursday 10.30 am-11 pm

Opening 13 January from 7pm

Viale E. Alemagna 6, 20121

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La Triennale di Milano presents Marc Camille Chaimowicz. Maybe Metafisica curated by Eva Fabbris, with the artistic direction of Edoardo Bonaspetti, curator of Triennale Arte.

For his first solo show in an Italian public venue, Marc Camille Chaimowicz has conceived an exhibition design linked to the history and architecture of the Palazzo dell’Arte—home to the Triennale of Milan— with works revealing a formal and emotive affinity with the most oneiric of the historical avant-garde movements, Metaphysical art, and its artistic heirs.

Chaimowicz is a pioneer in the multidisciplinary approach. Starting in the 1970s, his installations and performances anticipated the now widespread practice of merging visual arts with choreography, stage direction and curatorship. Open to the intermingling of design, literature and theatre, the artist dedicated entire bodies of works to key people in his career, figures of melancholy and rebellion, including Jean Cocteau, Jean Genet and Gustave Flaubert.

Starting from Giorgio de Chirico’s Il Figliuol prodigo (Prodigal Son, 1973), in which a father and son are painted in a bare interior imbued with a surreal disquiet, the exhibition follows a circular path, characterized by a sense of suspension. Immersed in this atmosphere, the observer encounters some of the most characteristic expressive modes in the artist’s quest, ranging from decoration to painting and from installations to the construction of interiors. The domestic intimacy of reclining desks is juxtaposed with works of architectural inspiration such as the Arches (1975–2016) and the Two-Speed Staircase (1999–2016), giving rise to places pervaded by a dreamlike quality, sometimes physically inaccessible, as in We Chose Our Words With Care, That Neon-Moonlit Evening; It Was As If We Were, Party To A Wonderful Alchemy (1975– 2008), a work that can only be viewed through holes in a curtain, or the mysterious Project For A Rural House (2003–2016), which immerses the viewer in the meditative atmosphere of motionless time.

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The Books of the Architecture of the City
curated by Victoria Easton, Kersten Geers and Guido Tesio

15 September – 22 October
Monday – Friday 11 am-6 pm
Saturday 2-6 pm

Opening 14 September from 6.30 pm

Via del Vecchio Politecnico 3, 20121

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In 1966, Aldo Rossi published a book that refuted the then current arguments on the city and its design, and whose reception exceeded all expectations: L’architettura della citta? was fast internationally hailed as a classic.

Built upon a combination of unconventional fragments from various disciplines, cultures and authors, the book engendered a conceptual framework – as opaque as it appeared – for effective exploration of the complexity of the contemporary city, the success of which persisted at least until the work of Rossi himself, with all its later simplifications and cartoonesque positions, began to colour people’s perceptions of his theories. Now, on the 50th anniversary of the original launch of L’architettura della citta?, this exhibition presents itself as a formal exercise both in celebrating this ‘mythical’ work and taking it off its pedestal, dusting it down so as to be able to (re-)engage with its tenets.

The importance of the book manifests in the uncertainty that accompanies us still, when interpreting and designing the city today. The issues raised by Rossi in the 1960s have by no means been resolved: cities are still complex; their physical configuration still mirrors their history in a non-linear, contradictory manner; and urban phenomena remain inexplicable unless approached in the light of the city as a whole. Is Rossi’s ‘city-as-a-book’ or ‘book-as-a-city’ a metaphor we need to hang on to? Perhaps it is, given that the construction of this book results in many ways from the construction of the architect: the architecture of the city built Aldo Rossi, so to speak. Or should it perhaps be dismissed or deconstructed once and for all? We – in presenting here a Difficult Whole, scrutinised but not unravelled – take the liberty of not letting that happen.

In returning to the sources on which Rossi drew in order to construct his book, in recovering the original editions so as to expound both their literary and iconographic value, "The Books of the Architecture of the City" exhibition celebrates the generosity of the book, beyond the fame of its author, and therewith proposes that Aldo Rossi be regarded as only one among many contributors to an intimately multifaceted and collective project called L’architettura della citta?: a book made of books.

"The Books of the Architecture of the City" does not present a thoroughly researched ‘new' claim regarding the truth (or not) of Rossi’s flawed masterpiece. It is rather, a simple survey of all that Rossi explicitly included within its pages. Thus, the exhibition shows everything and nothing simultaneously. Here, all the books of The Architecture of the City are brought together and made accessible for the first time. They are displayed alongside a set of books made of facsimiles in which all the quoted text excerpts and graphical excerpts from the original editions are compiled. A photographic essay by Stefano Graziani visually resonates with the fragments of text. In drawing on more than 150 books, on a multiplicity of origins and references, L’architettura della citta? is resolutely an organism that prompts the on-going mutation of its own content as well as ample opportunities for a continuous internal and external dialogue. By showing nothing but what was already there, "The Books of the Architecture of the City" plainly exposes the contents of the original text, thus calling upon the visitor to explore Rossi’s fiction as well as to venture into building new sets of analogies and correspondences.

In collaboration with Form - ENAC – EPFL e la Fondazione Aldo Rossi.

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Fredrik Værslev
"Home is where my art is"

15 September – 29 October
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am-7 pm

Opening 15 September from 7pm to 9pm

Via A. Tadino 20, 20124

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The focus of the show is on Fredrik Værslev’s terrazzo paintings.
A body of small-scale works are exhibited inside a series of wooden houses Fredrik Værslev specifically produced and painted for the show.

Fredrik Værslev – Easy to Clean and Easy to Ignore

“Every artist is linked to a mistake with which he has a particular intimacy. All art draws its origin from an exceptional fault, each work is the implementation of this original fault, from which comes a risky plenitude and new light.

(Maurice Blanchot, in The Book to Come)

The floor means civilizing the ground we walk on. Floors replace the naked ground in all its crudeness. Laying a floor means starting the construction of borders between nature and civilisation. A floor – made out of wood, concrete or plastic – signifies a place on earth.

The concept of place specificity has been used in a number of artistic strategies over the years. Around the turn of the century, curator and art historian Miwon Kwon wrote about how site-specific art was “becoming more and more ‘unhinged’ from the actuality of the site”. In a similar manner Fredrik Værslev’s terrazzo paintings mimic a process of unhinging when his paintings lift patterns that belong to floors, terrazzo floors, onto a surface that is then exposed vertically to the audience. The patterns mentally connect to floors, but are places cut loose from spatial connections. They become objects of aesthetic contemplation, but also objects that enable meditations on everything from the fluidity of space in a digitalized world to nostalgic longings for a specific type of floor.

Værslev’s terrazzo paintings have a specific genealogy. He has dealt with the often bland, but omnipresent, terrazzo floors in post-war Scandinavian staircases of multi-storey buildings. He has been looking for meaningful painterly transformations from concrete to canvas.

These floors often have a concrete grey tone spotted with a dirty white. They are both easy to clean and easy to ignore. Their characteristic pattern is achieved by mixing into the concrete a ballast of gravel. The whole is then grinded and honed until the original surface with all of its individual bumps turns into a smooth, even pattern. The three-dimensional surface becomes a kind of two-dimensional cross-section, a visual code.

The genealogy has also been expanded, to the terrazzo floors of old palazzi in Venice. In them, fine terrazzo alla veneziana, centuries old, often patterned with inlays of concrete and ballasts in various colours, seem to float and make slight waves as the unstable grounds are reflected in settlements in the pavements.

But terrazzo as a material goes further back in time than Venice and was frequently used in antiquity. In a hierarchy of floors terrazzo was – in spite of its creative possibilities and technical advantages – regarded as the ordinary, overshadowed by both mosaics and solid stone. But, as is often the case, the most common materials have an unusual potential for survival, and they resurface in both 16th century palazzi and Scandinavian modernist multi-storey dwellings.

Fredrik Værslev’s paintings are not primarily about metaphysical speculations and rituals, in spite of superficial likenesses with the works of painters like Jackson Pollock. Værslev is, in his artistic research – be it about terrazzo floors, awnings or sundecks – profoundly interested in the everyday. The everyday is his starting point. This is brought into the sphere of fine art through the simulation of patterns. He studies that which we step on or walk by, abstracts it into colours on a surface, often letting the unpainted play with the painted.

It is a sequence of architectural dialogues; with history, with materials, with places, with theories, and with viewers. Ultimately it is about unhinged experiences reconnecting to walls over and over again.

Mans Holst-Ekstrom
art historian and writer

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Michael Rey
"PLYDIS KAVE"

15 September – 21 October
Monday, 3-7 pm
Tuesday – Friday, 11 am-7 pm (closed 1.30-2.30 pm)

Opening 15 September from 7pm to 9pm

Viale Premuda 46, 20129

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Mario Cutajar: There are a number of notable feature about your work, but one that immediately stands out is your use of shape. I’m curious about how you come up with your shapes, how you develop them.

Michael Rey: I used to have a very simplistic idea of the format of painting. It was either horizontal, which recalled landscapes, or vertical and associated with portraiture. I tried to get away from that and at first only succeeded in coming up with a square.
I broke out of the square when I started using scraps of wood and testing the limits of chop saws and table saws. I just started arbitrarily cutting angled joints and then slapping a substrate on top and routing it to get a shaped panel. There was really no rhyme or reason to it, it was just kind of playing with what was there. It got me out of a very restrictive notion of what a painting surface should be.

MC: You’re one of very few artists I know who can genuinely claim a working class background. You are quite knowledgeable about carpentry tools and techniques and comfortable enough with their use that you are able to employ them as drawing tools.

MR: I realized when I was in school that I have a certain kind of what I would call material thinking or intuition. I have always been curious about materials and how they can be shaped and manipulated. My high school teacher taught me how to weld at an early age.
Wood-shops and metal shops became a second home to me because I figured out that’s where I could learn how to build things. I was a total shop junkie. I wanted to know everything there was about how to cast bronze, how to use a lathe, how to curve wood . . .
Then, after 9/11, I remember thinking about how I might survive in a world that didn't have civilization any more.
I'm not one of those doomsday preppers, but I remember trying to figure out what it would take to become self-reliant.
Subsequently I ended travelling across America and getting a bunch of manual jobs including one in a bronze foundry and another in a high-end cabinet making shop.

MC: Let’s talk about monochromes. In a monochrome, shape becomes very important because once you have a uniform color, you start noticing the edges that are the boundary of the color field. So with your use of the monochrome what is highlighted is...

MR: The edges.

MC: The edges. I think that connects with your investment in shaping the support and not accepting the rectangle as a default.

MR: And, as you know, around 2009, I also started perforating the surfaces. It took me a while to come around to putting holes in my shapes.

MC: A lot of things start happening when those holes appear. because you are not just shaping the exterior, the boundary, but also creating an internal structure. Your shapes are often symmetrical, but the holes do not follow the contour, they are in contrast to the contour.
Now, of course, with the holes we can start seeing what's behind the holes. I mean the wall actually is visible through these holes, so you are not looking at an undivided surface, you are actually looking at a surface and seeing the wall coming through the holes, and I was suggesting to you earlier that I thought that was a way to connect the painting of your surfaces with another type of painting, with what tends to be pejoratively dismissed as house painting.
Let’s get back to how you create your shapes.

MR: A lot of it comes from drawing. I draw all the time. It’s almost automatic drawing. I just sit there and draw. Sometimes weeks can go by and nothing comes. Then I’ll suddenly do 20 drawings. I have a kind of sense of what I want in a shape. Afterward, I’ll pick a drawing and transpose it onto graph paper, using French curves and templates to create symmetry.

MC: Why do you think symmetry is important for you? For me it organizes the form.

MC: Maybe what I’m really asking you is what makes a shape resonate for you?

MR: I’m looking to surprise myself. What I’m looking for is something uncanny, something unfamiliar. That’s why I have to do a lot of drawing to get anywhere. The uncanny is not something you can produce at will. You have to get over your own “natural” impulses, which can be derivative. I also have to work to avoid anthropomorphic references. If things become like claws or hands or faces or
crosses, some kind of recognizable thing, I become wary.

MC: It's funny because I think your work always seems to be hovering on the edge of iconicity. I find myself asking: Where have I seen this? Have I seen a Christmas decoration that sort of looks a bit like that? Have I seen a computer icon that maybe reminds me of this? Have I seen a ...

MR: Corporate logo?

MC: Sure, a corporate logo, or any number of things.

MR: When I was first making these, people would say they were tools or some kind of utilitarian thing. However, I actually work very hard to retain ambiguity in the shape, to allow it as great a degree of polyvalence as possible.

MC: This polyvalence you’re keen on also suggests an elusive gendering or a paradoxical one.

MR: It’s a way to bend these things away from taking on macho trappings. My background is working class, but I’m not interested in glorifying testosterone.

MC: You coat your surfaces with some kind of clay substance related to Plasticine, right? You are creating an allusion to skin.

MR: The clay adds another factor, beyond color and shape.

MC: This clay layer retains the impressions of the fingers or whatever tool was used to spread it, and that's separate from the nuances of the paint layer on top of it.

MR: Well, actually, the interaction between the clay layer and the paint on top is more complex because the clay introduces variations in the way the oil paint gets absorbed and dries. You’ll notice that the surfaces are not uniformly glossy or matte, something difficult to make out in photographs. These surface variations continue to shift for some time after the painting is finished.

MC: There is something odd, perhaps even perverse going on here because the shapes you use are not suggestive of body parts but they end up being fleshy.

MR: It’s like android flesh over a machine armature.

MC: And this clayey, painted flesh is easily damaged.

MR: Yes, it’s very much like skin that way. It bruises. It's susceptible to injury.

MC: So you have these objects that are very robustly constructed but then they present a surface that’s completely vulnerable. I’m tempted to call them hysterical bodies.

MR: But it’s a vulnerability that’s largely hidden. The only clue, if you pay attention, is the exposed clay on the edge of the pieces. I’m playing with flirtation, with diva stagecraft. Frontally, you get the alluring silhouette and color and from the side you get a hint of nudity. I want the painting to draw you close but at the same time forbid touching. Noli me tangere. Isn’t that perhaps the essential hysteric injunction?

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Mimmo Rotella
“Blanks”

19 September – 22 December
Monday – Friday 10 am-7 pm
Saturday by appointment

Opening 19 September from 7pm to 9pm

Corso di Porta Nuova 38, 20121

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If with the décollages, realized tearing posters taken directly from the street, the artist had discovered the infinite possibilities of the popular image, with the blanks (also called ‘coperture’) he set out to explore the temporal and linguistic limits of this mode of communication.
The street and the city were once again sources of inspiration for the artist that, wondering around Milan, discovered that the posters were covered up by monochrome pieces of paper when the time of their display on the city walls was over. Fascinated by the hidden message, obliterated by a quite anonymous paper, he started to create the blanks: a procedure that cancel the chaos, the disorder, the superimposition shown with the décollage covering them with a new skin made up of monochrome tissue paper revealing the infinite possibilities of colour, of transparency and of the essential act.

The majority of the blanks were created in the beginning of 1980s by sticking large monochrome – black, white and coloured – sheets of paper onto old and disused advertising hoardings. Right at the beginning of that decade Rotella left Paris and moved for good to Milan. He had a new studio and began to forge new links with the city and its streets. The ‘coperture’ were the starting-point for his subsequent research, marked by for a return to the image through an approach influenced by the graffiti language.
The blanks were shown for the first time in Milan in January 1981. Since then these works have been exhibited on very few occasions. So Cardi Gallery is trying to fill this gap and presenting to the public a little-known but crucial aspect of Mimmo Rotella’s production.

A catalogue, that is the first publication to be devoted entirely to the subject, accompanies the show and we believe it bodes well, and can be an excellent point of departure, for future studies of this series of works. The exhibition Mimmo Rotella, Blanks is part of “Mimmo Rotella 2016” an initiative linked to the tenth anniversary of the passing of Mimmo Rotella. It involves a number of galleries and institutions in Milan, witnessing the relationship between the artist and the city where he worked and lived in his last years.
The initiative is realized in collaboration with Mimmo Rotella Institute, set up in 2012 by Inna and Aghnessa Rotella with the aim of compiling the catalogue raisonné, improving understanding of the figure and the art of Mimmo Rotella and promoting his work at the national and international level. The Mimmo Rotella Institute is directed by Antonella Soldaini with the scientific support of Veronica Locatelli.

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Benni Bosetto
Florida

19 September – 22 October
Open only by appointment

Opening 19 September 7 pm

Via Garian 64, 20146

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TILE project space is pleased to present Florida, the first solo show by Benni Bosetto.

The project is to create a narrative device that consists of several elements: a set design, characters, symbolic elements and a pending estate script.
Building a fictional space, the artist clears the imagination of reconstructing the story from its origins through the use of drawing, the first tool of the human expression, and paper.
The environment has been designed as a domestic sanctuary where Greek columns, arches and a tropical nature punctuate the background. Two characters lay in the center of the room, menjoying helplessly the benefits of eternal fountain of youth. The artist, working more on building a narrative image than of an encompassing environment, forces the public to stay away from the scene in progress, defining in this way a physical space that allows each visitor an intimac with the story and the characters.
The contemplative experience is accompanied by inertia and slower pace of the whole mise­en­scene, strengthening both the melancholy tone that the narrative potential.

Benni Bosetto (Merate, 1987) currently attends the Dirty Art Department of Sandberg Institute in Amsterdam. In 2010 she graduated at Fine art Academy of Brera in Milan. In 2014 she got a degree in Sculpture attending, through Erasmus School Project, the UDK of Berlin (Michaela Meise’s class).
Solo exhibition: Razzle Dazzle Love, Performance self­curated at Parco Lambro, Milan. Group exhibition: Susy Culinski & friends, Fanta Spazio, project by Beatrice Marchi, Milan; Vorrei non vederti oggi per vederti tutti gli altri giorni @ Franchising Zuretti, Milan; Benvenuta Bosetto >< Saki Nagatani, curated by Alice Tomaselli, ?? Space–Lucie Fontaine’s Tokyo satellite; YEAR ONE, performance, Tile Project Space, Milan; Studi d'artista, Expo Gate, Milano; SUMMER PAINTING SHOW, IL CREPACCIO, Milan; Open Studio | Benni Bosetto and Hugo Scibetta, VIR Viafarini­in­reseidence, Milan; WINWIN, Meise's class exhibition, Berlin. 

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Urs Fischer
"Battito di Ciglia"

20 September – 17 December
Tuesday – Saturday
11.30 am-7 pm

Opening 20 September from 6pm to 9pm

Via Ventura 5 e Palazzo Belgioioso, Piazza Belgioioso 2 - Milano Italy

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Urs Fischer - who returns to Milan following his last show at Massimo De Carlo in 2006, where he exhibited alongside his close friend Rudolf Stingel, and his successful 2005 exhibition Jet Set Lady organized by Fondazione Nicola Trussardi—will be the first artist to exhibit in Massimo De Carlo’s two spaces: at the recently inaugurated space at Palazzo Belgioioso and in the gallery’s headquarters on Via Ventura.

Shifting between the familiar and the unknown, Urs Fischer’s world is populated by sculptures, installations, paintings, and drawings that construct an infinite anthology of mutations. With wit and an often-dark sense of humour, Fischer’s work provokes and evokes, playing with archetypes through the radical transformation of materials.

From his earlier works such as the halved apple and pear joined together with a screw (2000) to his iconic “Bread House” (2004-05), a chalet made entirely of bread loaves that has been exhibited at the Whitney Biennial in New York and at the Istituto dei Ciechi in Milan, Fischer has worked on different scales and with different materials, organic and non, investigating the notion and process of alteration.

In 2015 he installed a massive clay-inspired sinuous aluminium sculpture, 13 meters tall, in front of the Seagram Building in New York. As with his recent retrospective Faux Friends at Geneva’s Musée d’Art et d’Histoire, Fischer’s dazzling creations are made of variable sizes, from large to small scale, and in turns of long-lasting and non-durable material: wax, clay, aluminium, rubber, and food all become part of a quest to grasp an anachronistic sense of decay, ephemerality, and resilience.

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Matthias Bitzer

20 September – 15 November
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am-7.30 pm

Opening 20 September

Via Massimiano 25, 20134

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A line, a curve, a color, a light, a reflection, an outline on the wall.
Matthias Bitzer conceives his shows in the same way a language is constructed: paintings, drawings, collages and sculptures speak with their own grammar and lexicon. They move harmoniously through the space like words on a page, notes on a pentagram featuring colors, neon lights and reflections.

The variation of expressive means and the combination of all the elements does not preclude the sensation of finding oneself inside a single installation; even in the decorative elements, in the abstract structures one can recognize a flow of thoughts, a precise logic. The movement and aesthetics of these compositions expand into the space, geometric elements are recombined in more or less extended patters, alternating the perspective and suggesting new visual possibilities: Bitzer takes us into an immersive reality, a kaleidoscopic landscape.

The result is an amalgam of spatial planes that open up inside of the construction itself, linked one to though despite belonging to different orders of volume and depth. Bitzer rethinks the categories of space and time, he distorts and liquefies them, and at the same time contracts them. He embraces the possibility that space can be together single and multiple, infinitely extendable, divisible into compartments without altering its physical structures. Like a cloud floating delicately, tracing impalpable forms in continuous transformation and always evoking new iconographic associations.

The simultaneous presence of figurative elements and abstract geometrical compositions, dancing forms, hard lines and fluid movements produces a sensual atmosphere that leads to a rich imagery of memories and references, denoting a tendency towards analysis, explanation, the search for a context. Through his work, Bitzer is able to capture and offer a novel visual experience, in which time and space are improbable and forms are deprived of their legibility, allowing new structures to emerge.

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Helen Mirra, Allyson Strafella
"fieno, fieno, fieno"

21 September – 26 November
Tuesday – Saturday
10 am-7.30 pm (closed 1-3 pm)

Opening 21 September from 7pm to 9pm

Via A. Stradella 1, 4, 7, 20129

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There is a keen accord between Helen Mirra and Allyson Strafella, and a few years ago they began an intimate conversation of sorts. On the occasion of this project with Raffaella Cortese in Milan, this conversation continues with new works made in consideration of hay fields, straw bales and their contexts.

In via Stradella 4, Helen Mirra presents small tapestry weavings. Even if the activity of long-distance walking, fundamental in Mirra's practice, is not directly involved in these new works, her ongoing use of primary materials (linen and wool) demonstrates the connection to the ground and one senses the sameness of the rhythms of walking and weaving.

In via Stradella 1, Allyson Strafella presents drawings made with a typewriter. This is a method of working she has been immersed in since the early 90s. With patience and fearlessness she finds the edge of form and formlessness, made and un-made.

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"Five / Fifty / Five Hundred”

21 September – 28 October
Monday – Friday: 10 am-6 pm (closed 1-3 pm)
Saturday by appointment

Opening 21 September from 7pm to 9pm

Via B. Zenale 3, 20123

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The exhibition draws inspiration from the gallery's inaugural exhibition,‘I Know About Creative Block And I Know NotTo Call It By Name’, which was curated by British conceptual artist Ryan Gander in September 2011. Re7ecting on an artist's creative process, Gander stated in the press release that it is often during the most every day moments that creativity strikes, when 'magic dust' begins to fall. ‘Five / Fifty / Five Hundred’ includes work by a number of Lisson artists who have exhibited at the Milan gallery over the past ve years, highlighting the artistic residue they have left behind and their ability to perpetually inspire.

Artists and their legacies will be honoured next year when Lisson Gallery celebrates its ftieth anniversary in London. Lisson Gallery is one of the longest-running international art

galleries in the world and has been responsible for introducing important art movements, such as Conceptual Art and Minimalism, and numerous international artists to European audiences. Since the 1960s, the gallery has been at the forefront of developments in contemporary art and has shown work by some of the world’s most innovative artists.With exhibition spaces in London and Milan, along with its new outpost in New York, the gallery continues to support international artists who push the conceptual and disciplinary boundaries in which they work.

‘Five / Fifty / Five Hundred’ also references the creative energy surrounding Lisson Gallery Milan in the context of Casa degli Atellani and the vineyard of Leonardo da Vinci, which shares its garden with the gallery. In 2015, after a decade of research and nearly 500 years after Leonardo’s death, the Renaissance master’s original vineyard has been recreated using the exact type of vine grown in the 1500s at the bottom of Casa degli Attelani’s garden. Opposite the house and garden is the church of Santa Maria della Grazie, which features the work by another great Italian artist of the 15th century, Donato Bramante. Bramante transformed the church into a unique, harmonic blend of Gothic and Renaissance styles that set the background for da Vinci’s iconic painting The Last Supper, for which he received the vineyard from Ludovico il Moro, the Duke of Milan, as payment.

A highlight of ‘Five / Fifty / Five Hundred’ includes a large-scale, wooden structure by Ai Weiwei assembled in the shape of an icosahedron – a form rst illustrated by Leonardo da Vinci for the mathematician Luca Pacioli’s 1509 treaty The Divine Proportion. Wow! (2013), a neon installation by Christian Jankowski, curator of the 11th edition of Manifesta, will also feature in the exhibition.The work is part of a larger series that translates entries from visitor books to Jankowski’s exhibitions into neon. Other participating artists include Angela de la Cruz, Spencer Finch, Ryan Gander, Douglas Gordon, Shirazeh Houshiary, John Latham, Richard Long, Haroon Mirza, Julian Opie and Florian Pumhosl.

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Sadie Benning
"Excuse Me Ma’am”

22 September – 05 November
Tuesday – Saturday (Monday by appointment)
11 am-7.30 pm

Opening 22 September from 7 pm

Via di Porta Tenaglia 7, 20121

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Sadie Benning started making experimental videos as a teenager in 1988. The low-fi, black and white videos explored aspects of identity, language and memory. Improvising with materials that were immediately available at the time, Benning fragmentally constructed moving images from found objects, drawings, text, performance and personally shot footage. The form, content and poetics explored in the earlier video works has expanded over the past two decades, continuing to wrestle with evolving political, conceptual and material questions.

The body of work comprised in Excuse Me Ma’am features paintings which include digital photographs of intimately scaled notebook drawings. These quick pencil sketches have been upscaled in size, accentuating the noise and color spectrum of its original while retaining a kind of directness and fragility.

The phrase Excuse Me Ma’am encapsulates the moment of being signified within a binary gender narrative, a moment experienced many times within a single day. These works explore the complicated relationship between the body and how it is named within the culture, and the interminable desire to exist outside of the constructed polarities of male and female.

The form of these works is not easy to categorize. Combining painting, photography, drawing and sculpture, we ask ourselves: What is this thing, what is it made of? How is a painting a painting and also not a painting? What goes unseen? What is distorted by the eye?
Benning urges us to approach gender in this same manner, broadening the categories to the point of shattering them.

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Deborah Kass
"Deborah Kass: Art Histories"

22 September – 12 November
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am-7pm (close 1-2.30 pm)

Opening 22 September from 7pm to 9pm

Via C. Farini 32, 20159

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In 1992 Kass began The Warhol Project. Using Andy Warhol’s technical and stylistic language to represent figures in many cases no less iconic, Kass nevertheless turned Warhol’s ambivalent relationship to popular culture on its head by choosing subjects that had an explicitly personal and political relationship to her own cultural interests. Kass painted artists and art historians that were her “heroes” in the vein of Warhol’s celebrities. Her My Elvis series speaks to gender and ethic identity by replacing Warhol’s Elvis with Barbra Streisand from Yentl: a 1983 film in which Streisand plays a Jewish woman who dresses and lives as a man in order to receive an education in the Talmudic Law. In My Elvis, Kass states her concerns about gender relations, promotes feminist advocacy in society, and directly challenges patriarchy.

Kass’s Self Portraits as Warhol nod to the act of drag performed in her all appropriation of Warhol’s work (Blue Deb, 2000).
In The Jewish Jackie Series (1992–93), Kass borrowed Warhol’s checkerboard-like compositions and inserted in the rectangles repeated Barbra Streisand (a photograph of whose head in profile with the nose held high) in place of his Jackies, Marilyns, or Judys.

In 2002, Kass began a new body of work, Feel Good Paintings for Feel Bad Times, inspired, in part, by her reaction to the Bush administration. These works combine stylistic devices from a wide variety of post-war painting, including Ellsworth Kelly, Frank Stella, Jackson Pollock, Andy Warhol, and Ed Ruscha, along with lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, Laura Nyro, and Sylvester, among others, pulling from popular music, Broadway show tunes, the Great American Songbook, Yiddish, and film. The paintings view American art and culture of the last century through the lens of that time period’s outpouring of creativity that was the result of post-war optimism, a burgeoning middle class, and democratic values. Responding to the uncertain political and ecological climate of the new century in which they have been made, Kass’s work looks back on the 20th century critically and simultaneously with great nostalgia, throwing the present into high relief. Drawing from the divergent realms of art history, popular culture, political realities, and her own political and philosophical reflection, the artist continues into the present the explorations that have characterized her paintings since the 1980s in these new hybrid textual and visual works.

Deborah Kass has recently declared her support for Democratic presidential contender Hillary Clinton with a bold, Andy Warhol- style artwork. Under the face of Donald Trump, Kass has scrawled the words “Vote Hillary.” The work mimics Warhol’s iconic screenprint Vote McGovern (1972), where the title words, urging viewers to support Democratic presidential nominee George McGovern, appear under the face of Republican incumbent Richard Nixon. Vote Hillary was produced to raise funds for the Clinton campaign, along with another edition by her fellow renowned artist and Hillary supporter, Chuck Close.

Paul Anthony Smith
"Blurred Lines"

22 September – 12 November
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am-7pm (close 1-2.30 pm)

Opening 22 September from 7pm to 9pm

Via C. Farini 32, 20159

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In Blurred Lines, Smith employs the use of drawing, layering cinderblocks to create walls of blurred lines. Smith continues the exploration of image manipulation, camouflaging ideas of nostalgia: how images are broken down into pixelated color blocks as a disguise to form walls.

His process started with 6 large photographs, which have been used in previous works. He painted cinder blocks on the photographs themselves —drawing with oil sticks, choosing colors corresponding to the photographs (in effect, turning a digital pixel into a handmade, expressive gesture). Then, using these prints as reference sketches, he recreated the cinder block pattern in the same colors drawing on canvases with a painted underlayer of white, blue, or bright yellow. This yellow color is of special significance to Jamaican cultures, notably the mango, commonly found on trees throughout the island. If someone has a mango tree, they will put any extra fruit out on their fence, often cinder block walls, for any passersby to take — making it a symbol of community in Jamaica, as opposed to its status as an expensive luxury item in the developed world.

Many of the bricks are black — however, they are all different shades of black (mixed with reds, greens, etc.), and this subtlety is hard to perceive on first glance.

Smith is very aware of the political overtones. The title “Blurred Lines” refers to both his mark-making as well as the blurred distinctions in contemporary culture and politics — including gun laws, tragedies across America, and ongoing immigration laws concerning the US-Mexico border.

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Marco Pio Mucci
"Maschile Romantico"

23 September – 16 October
Saturday - Sunday
12-19 or by appointment

Opening 23 September 6.30 pm - 9 pm

Via Privata Don Bartolomeo Grazioli 73, 20161

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Armada is pleased to present Maschile Romantico, the first solo exhibition by Marco Pio Mucci.
The show includes two sculptures that portray the artist himself. Mucci decided to let other people near him, to catch and shape him - from his body details to the choice of his clothes - for the production of the work. Free from referring to these works as self-portraits, Mucci reflects on the dualism between his private and public persona; in this loop of being “self-portrayed” Mucci tries to achieve the consciousness of his own image, within the paradox of giving a form to a view of the self, through the eyes of someone else.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Alex Katz
"Small paintings and drawings 1990-2016"

27 September – 12 November
Tuesday – Saturday
3-7 pm

Opening 27 September 6.30 pm

Via F. Viganò 4, 20124

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After his large shows this year at the Guggenheim in Bilbao and the Serpentine Gallery in London, we are delighted to announce an exhibition of small paintings and drawings by Alex Katz.

We will present the more intimate side of the great painter’s work. His small paintings are made directly in front of the live model or en plein air, their brush strokes are more gestural and impulsive. They are not only preparatory studies showing a monumental plan at its birth, but also autonomous works revealing the initial and spontaneous passion of the artist for his subject. Katz?s ability in rendering the fragile unity of a moment with a few brush strokes, reveals much of the person portrayed and of the artist?s personal reflections, voluntarily abandoned in the large portraits on canvas which show a more stylized and essential vision.This characteristic is enhanced by the small size which draws the viewer to approach closely and enter the space of the painting, thereby establishing a more intimate physical and mental relationship with the work. Also the drawings offer insight into the artist's process as often the original idea for a painting is illustrated here in its nascent state. Katz draws quickly in charcoal and pencil searching for the right expression, but in fact often his drawings are almost as accomplished as a painting, they are like paintings in black and white.

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