25 September

Galleries & Museums
20 Pirelli HangarBicocca
21 Fondazione Prada
6 Cortesi Gallery
11 Istituto Svizzero
18 Francesca Minini
12 kaufmann repetto
2 Brand New Gallery
8 Massimo De Carlo
25 La Triennale
3 Cardi Gallery
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Pirelli HangarBicocca

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Pirelli HangarBicocca

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Pirelli HangarBicocca

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Fondazione Prada

Fondazione Prada Osservatorio Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II 63, 20121

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Fondazione Prada

Fondazione Prada Milano Largo Isarco 2, 20139

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Cortesi Gallery

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Istituto Svizzero

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Francesca Minini

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kaufmann repetto

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Brand New Gallery

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Brand New Gallery

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Massimo De Carlo

Palazzo Belgioioso Piazza Belgioioso 2, 20121

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Massimo De Carlo

Lambrate/Ventura Via G. Ventura 5, 20134

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Massimo De Carlo

Lambrate/Ventura Via G. Ventura 5, 20134

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La Triennale

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Cardi Gallery

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Gió Marconi

Via A. Tadino 20, 20124

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kaufmann repetto

Via di Porta Tenaglia 7, 20121

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Galleria Raffaella Cortese

Via A. Stradella 1, 4, 7, 20129

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Brand New Gallery

Via C. Farini 32, 20159

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Cardi Gallery

Corso di Porta Nuova 38, 20121

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Galleria Monica De Cardenas

Via F. Viganò 4, 20124

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Massimo De Carlo

Via G. Ventura 5 / Palazzo Belgioioso, Piazza Belgioioso 2,

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Pirelli HangarBicocca

Via Chiese 2, 20126

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Istituto Svizzero

Via del Vecchio Politecnico 3, 20121

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miart

Viale L. Scarampo, 20149

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Francesca Minini

Via Massimiano 25, 20134

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Galleria Lia Rumma

Via Stilicone 19, 20154

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La Triennale

Viale E. Alemagna 6, 20121

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ZERO...

Viale Premuda 46, 20129

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Marsèlleria

Via privata Rezia 2, 20135

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Fondazione Nicola Trussardi

Piazza E. Duse 4, 20122

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Le Dictateur

FutureDome, Via Paisiello 6,

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Fondazione Prada

Largo Isarco 2, 20139 / Osservatorio Fondazione Prada,

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Fondazione Carriero

Via Cino del Duca, 4, 20122

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Fanta Spazio

Via Merano 21, 20127

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Tile Project Space

Via Garian 64, 20146

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Armada

Via Privata Don Bartolomeo Grazioli 73, 20161

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MEGA

Piazza Vetra 21, 20123

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Federica Schiavo Gallery

Via Barozzi 6, 20122

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Cortesi Gallery

Corso di Porta Nuova 46/B, 20121

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10 Corso Como

Corso Como 10 - 20154

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Bar Basso

Via Plinio 39 - 20129

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La Belle Aurore

Via Privata G. Abamonti 1 - 20129

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Fioraio Bianchi Caffè

Via Montebello 7 - 20121

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Carminio

Via Del Carmine 3 - 20121

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Carpaccio

Via L. Palazzi 19 - 20124

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Charmant

Via G. Colombo 42 - 20133

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Grand Hotel et de Milan

Via A. Manzoni 29 - 20121

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Lile in cucina

Via F. Guicciardini 5 - 20129

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Panificio Davide Longoni

Via G. Tiraboschi 19 - 20135

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Pasticceria Marchesi

Via Santa Maria alla Porta 11a - 20123

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Trattoria Masuelli San Marco

Viale Umbria 80 - 20135

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La Nuova Arena

Piazza Lega Lombarda 5 - 20154

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Pavé

Via F. Casati 27 - 20124

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Antica Trattoria della Pesa

Viale Pasubio 10 - 20154

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Picchio

Via Melzo 11 - 20129

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Piero e Pia

Piazza D. Aspari 2 - 20129

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Polpetta DOC

Via B. Eustachi 8 - 20129

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Vivaio Riva

Via Arena 7 - 20123

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Osteria del Treno

Via San Gregorio 46 - 20124

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Violette

Via P. Castaldi 14 - 20124 

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Fonderia Artistica Battaglia

Via Stilicone 10 - 20154

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Mandarin Oriental

Via Andegari 9 - 20121

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Pasticceria Cucchi

Corso Genova 1 - 20123

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Otto

Via Paolo Sarpi 10 - 20154

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DRY Cocktails & Pizza

Via Solferino 33 - 20121

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Capetown Café

Via Vigevano 3 - 20144

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Pisacco

Via Solferino 48 - 20121

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CONVERSO

CLS Architetti - San Paolo Converso Piazza S. Eufemia, Milano - 20122

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Rosa Barba "From Source to Poem to Rhythm to Reader"
Curated by Roberta Tenconi

05 May – 08 October
Thursday – Sunday
10 am-10 pm

Opening 04 May 7 pm-midnight

Via Chiese 2, 20126

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From May 5 to October 8, 2017, Pirelli HangarBicocca presents Rosa Barba’s solo exhibition “From Source to Poem to Rhythm to Reader,” curated by Roberta Tenconi: a project that brings together fourteen works made since 2009, including 35mm and 16mm films, kinetic sculptures, and site-specific pieces.

Barba’s exhibition “From Source to Poem to Rhythm to Reader,” hosted in the Shed space at Pirelli HangarBicocca, weaves an intense dialogue between the works on view and the industrial setting that houses them. The five films in the show, seen here for the first time in Italy, include The Empirical Effect (2009), an exploration of the landscape around Vesuvius as a web of natural, mental, and cultural forces, and the artist's two most recent works: Enigmatic Whisper (2017), shot in the studio of artist Alexander Calder, and From Source to Poem (2016), a densely layered audio-visual narration, increasingly overlapping and condensing, analogous to white noise, filmed in the Audio-Visual Conservation Center of the Library of Congress in Culpeper, Virginia, the world’s largest multimedia archive.

Rosa Barba (b. 1972 in Agrigento, Italy, based in Berlin), whose work has won many awards and been featured at international exhibitions and festivals, has chosen film as her primary tool of expression. For years, Barba has experimented with the language of cinema and sculpture, reflecting on the poetic qualities of the natural and human landscape, exploring the idea of place as a vessel of memory, and dismantling the notion of linear time. Powerfully striking images, portraits of obsolete architecture and natural landscapes, and visions of remote deserts turn up throughout her works, combined with fragments of text and scenarios where past and present intertwine.

“What I try to express in my films is that time is based on individual and smaller collective histories and is a very malleable and flexible phenomenon. In my films there are usually different time scales running parallel. My perspective as an observer is non-judgmental. I assume reality is a fiction that is based on individual interpretations of real events. My movies mostly play with the idea that they could happen in the future as well as in the past and are trying to manifest as a utopian solution.

(Rosa Barba in conversation with Mirjam Varadinis and Solveig Øvstebø, in Time as Perspective, Ostfildern: Hatje Cantz, 2013)

The Exhibition

The 35mm film From Source to Poem (2016), co-produced by Pirelli HangarBicocca and CAPC muse?e d’art contemporain de Bordeaux, France, with the participation of Tabakalera, Donostia, Spain, is shot in Culpeper, Virginia at the Packard Campus for Audio-Visual Conservation, part of the Library of Congress: more than 90 miles of shelves that hold a collection of over four million items, both moving-image (films, videos, television episodes) and audio recordings (music, spoken word, radio broadcasts) in obsolete formats as well as modern digital files. Following on a previous trilogy titled The Hidden Conference (2010- 15)—a project where Barba’s camera explores the storage areas of the Neue Nationalgalerie in Berlin, the Capitoline Museums in Rome, and Tate Modern in London—this new film juxtaposes voices speaking different languages with written text and words, mingling images from the Packard Campus with others shot in the desert, a place the artist considers a vast expanse of memory and an archive in its own right.

Along with desert scenes, Barba often shows us abandoned human landscapes, which have become the wreckage of a past era, places that take on a mysterious significance in our time. For instance, her film Subconscious Society, a Feature (2014) describes the end of the industrial age, alternating between a future “the present” in which protagonists are set in a type of memory theater, an evocative, moldering space, and the past “future”, set in powerful images of the bereft objects and buildings of industrial sites.

Personal histories and events are often the starting point for narratives that walk the line between experimental documentary and science fiction, where it is hard to tell memory from make-believe. The protagonists of The Empirical Effect (2009) are residents of the "red zone” around Vesuvius who survived the volcano’s last eruption in 1944. Blurring together different levels of narration, this film set around Vesuvius—for Rosa Barba a metaphor for the complex relationships between society and politics in Italy—stages an evacuation drill that has never been held.

In Rosa Barba’s practice, personal contact with the people who are tied to a given place is combined with a long, painstaking process of research and investigation. For Enigmatic Whisper (2017), her camera gained access to the studio of American sculptor Alexander Calder (1898-1976) in Roxbury, Connecticut, which has remained untouched since his death in 1976. Barba’s film offers a portrait of one of his sculptures, which has borne witness over many years to the joyful creative universe of this great figure in twentieth-century art history.

Rosa Barba’s work ultimately extends into a conceptual practice where the medium of film is employed to explore any possible aspect of its material, sculptural, and narrative qualities and the ways itarticulates space. Rolls of film or 16mm projectors often become compositional elements in kinetic sculptures that project sequences of colored light, focusing attention on the idea of movement and rhythm.

In The Long Poem Manipulates Spatial Organizations (2014), for instance, the projector is tilted 45 degrees to create a distorted image in which cut-out letters unfold across the screen like the notes of a score.

Whilst in Hear, There, Where the Echoes Are (2016), beams of light and color pour into the space and over visitors through a kinetic installation of sound and light, with five projectors synchronized to the rhythm of a drum score, showing a more performative aspect of Rosa Barba’s work.

On the occasion of the exhibition “From Source to Poem to Rhythm to Reader,” from summer 2017 a catalog titled From Source to Poem will be available with contributions by Rosa Barba, Manuel Borja-Villel, Giuliana Bruno, Joan Jonas, E?lisabeth Lebovici and Roberta Tenconi. The publication is bilingual, Italian and English, and published by Hatje Canz and Pirelli HangarBicocca.

Lucio Fontana “Ambienti/Environments”
Curated by Marina Pugliese, Barbara Ferriani & Vicente Todolí - In collaboration with Fondazione Lucio Fontana

21 September – 25 February
Thursday – Sunday
10 am-10 pm

Opening 20 September From 7 pm to midnight

Via Chiese 2, 20126

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Curated by art historian Marina Pugliese, conservator Barbara Ferriani, and Pirelli HangarBicocca Artistic Director Vicente Todolí. In collaboration with Fondazione Lucio Fontana.

Pirelli HangarBicocca in Milan presents Ambienti/Environments, a groundbreaking exhibition that brings together for the first time nine of Lucio Fontana’s seminal Ambienti spaziali, displayed throughout the gallery’s 5,000-square-metre space. Fontana’s pioneering work in the realm of installation art highlights the farsighted, innovative genius of this 20th century master.

Visitors to a major exhibition which will be staged at 15,000-square-metre Pirelli HangarBicocca in Milan will be able to walk through several of Lucio Fontana’s celebrated Ambienti spaziali (Spatial Environments) featuring different forms and colors which unfold through rooms, corridors and labyrinthine paths. As the public moves through and lingers within them, they gain a full sense of the amazing iconic and aesthetic power that makes these works so innovative even today. The show Ambienti/Environments, opening on September 20, 2017, has been developed in collaboration with Fondazione Lucio Fontana.

Ambienti/Environments opens with the environmental intervention Struttura al neon per la IX Triennale di Milano (Neon Structure for the 9th Milan Triennale, 1951), which Fontanaconceived as a decorative element for the 9th Milan Triennale. This vast arabesque, made up by hundred-meters-long neon tubes, hangs at the entrance to the exhibition space, ushering visitors into the series of environments, displayed in chronological order. They start with the first one the artist made, Ambiente spaziale a luce nera (Spatial Environment in Black Light, 1948–49), presented at Milan’s Galleria del Naviglio in 1949. It is a dark room lit by an ultraviolet lamp; suspended at the center is an abstract sculpture painted with fluorescent colors.

The public then encounters Utopie (Utopias), two corridors created in collaboration with artist and architect Nanda Vigo for the 13th Milan Triennale in 1964. These two works begin to foreground the perceptual experience of the visitor, through the use of neon lights and optical tricks, an aspect that Fontana also focused on in Ambiente spaziale (Spatial Environment), an installation conceived for his first and only large-scale solo show at an American museum, the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, in 1966, reconstructed here at Pirelli HangarBicocca for the first time. Through a lowered tunnel with a slanted floor, visitors enter a room with neon light shining through its perforated walls.

The next three Spatial Environments employ maze-like designs and colored neons to alter the space and viewing experience. Ambiente spaziale (Spatial Environment), Ambiente spaziale con neon (Spatial Environment with Neon), Ambiente spaziale a luce rossa (Spatial Environment with Red Light), all reconstructed for the first time at Pirelli HangarBicocca, were originally conceived for the European tour of the American solo show and presented in 1967 at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam and later at the Van Abbemuseum in Eindhoven. Straight after, visitors walk through Ambiente spaziale (Spatial Environment), conceived for the exhibition “Lo spazio dell’immagine” at Palazzo Trinci in Foligno the same year.

The last environment in the exhibition, presented in 1968: Ambiente spaziale in Documenta 4in Kassel (Spatial Environment in Documenta 4, in Kassel) has been installed at the end of the chronological sequence in the Navate, since it dates from the year the artist passed away. This work takes the form of a white maze leading to a large slit in the wall.

Ambienti/Environments winds up in the Cubo space with the second environmental intervention Fonti di energia, soffitto di neon per “Italia 61," a Torino (Energy Sources, Neon Ceiling for “Italia 61” in Turin) a monumental work made from seven levels of colored neon tubes, which Fontana designed for the Energy pavilion at the celebration for the centenary of the Unity of Italy in Turin in 1961.

The exhibition catalog will present the most up-to-date research into Fontana’s environments, featuring essays by Luca Massimo Barbero, Paolo Campiglio, Enrico Crispolti, Barbara Ferriani, Jennifer Josten, Orietta Lanzarini, Marina Pugliese, Anne Rana, Giovanni Rubino and Maria Villa.

Osgemeos “Efêmero”
curated by Cedar Lewisohn

21 April – 23 April
Thursday – Sunday
10 am-10 pm

Opening 20 April

Via Chiese 2, 20126

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Pirelli HangarBicocca presents the new public mural, Efêmero, the first large-scale mural in Italy by OSGEMEOS, who are among the world’s most renowned contemporary artists. This work on the outer walls of Pirelli HangarBicocca, to be inaugurated on April 20, 2016, is part of the new three-year project “Outside the Cube," which will involve innovative new approaches to art in public space and a rich calendar of parallel events. The industrial site of Pirelli HangarBicocca, where in the last century trains were made, will become the ideal setting for the work of OSGEMEOS and the many artists to follow.

The project at Pirelli HangarBicocca will delve deeper into the artist’s unique universe of mysterious symbolism and alternative realities. OSGEMEOS’s works often huge in scale, matched with its distinctive patterns and colour schemes, referencing the natural world and improvisation of Sao Paulo. The project will explore the history and spectacular architectural setting of Pirelli HangarBicocca, using the site as a starting point for an iconic new production. The mural will not only be painted on the buildings facade but be incorporated into the buildings architecture. This is an ongoing theme in the artists work, to create murals that transform the facade of a building into a new structure. The project will be accompanied by a limited edition catalogue designed by the artists. The book will explore further the artists history of architectural interventions and include images of their works that have repurposed the built environment.

Curated by artist and writer Cedar Lewisohn - who has authored many publications on art, and curated the exhibition “Street Art at Tate Modern” in 2008 - the project by OSGEMEOS will occupy the two outer walls of Pirelli HangarBicocca’s Cubo space, covering a total area of a thousand square meters. It will also be visible from the nearby train tracks and from the street.

OSGEMEOS, literally meaning “the twins,” is the pseudonym of Brazilian twin brothers Gustavo and Otavio Pandolfo (b. 1974 in Sao Paulo). This artistic duo, whose roots are in hip-hop culture and graffiti, began in the 1980s to develop a highly sophisticated oeuvre recognizable for its dreamlike landscapes and poetic figures, drawing on a vast range of cultural, social and political references.

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Satoshi Fujiwara “EU”

07 June – 16 October
Monday – Friday, 2-8 pm
Sat – Sun, 10 am-8 pm

Opening 07 June

Fondazione Prada Osservatorio
Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II 63, 20121

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“EU” is an anthological exhibition by Japanese photographer Satoshi Fujiwara presented at the Osservatorio in the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II in Milan. The show includes some of the most significant works by the artist long with “5K Confinement”, a commission realized for “Belligerent Eyes”, an experimental media research project on image production hosted at Fondazione Prada in Venice in Summer 2016.

Curated by Luigi Alberto Cippini in a set-up conceived by Armature globale, the exhibition offers an alternative to the representational regimes which have set the ground for the current “European photographic identity”. As stated by Cippini, “contemporary photographic production seems to be regulated by strict resolution, impact and distribution standards. An increasing number of freelance reporters daily documents social and political events within and on the edges of the European Union, producing images that, although free from any rigid classification standards, seem to be nonetheless subject to specific aesthetic, accessibility, spatial and content regimes. Such constraints allow and support the work of new generations of photographers, increasing the possibilities for their photos to be published yet contributing to the standardization of an average, neutral taste”.

Satoshi Fujiwara (Kobe, Japan, 1984), initiates a pressing and critical action on the gazer, through the focal length set from portrayed subjects and the heterogeneous definition of his photographs, diverting from the standards of photo-journalism and from an exclusively documentary dimension, thus producing a new emerging lexicon.

The exhibition is divided into two sections: the first, hosted on the lower level of Osservatorio, is a reconstruction of commission “5K Confinement”, whereas the upper floor hosts a retrospective which gathers works from a number of different series, such as “#R”(2015-ongoing), “THE FRIDAY: A report on a report” (2015), “Police Brutality” (2015), “Venus” (2016-ongoing), “Continent” (2017-ongoing), “Animal Material” (2016-ongoing), “Mayday” (2015), “Scanning”(2016) and “Green Helmet (2016).

Alejandro G. Iñárritu
CARNE y ARENA (Virtually Present, Physically Invisible)

07 June – 15 January
Via online booking only
Infos and bookings: www.fondazioneprada.org

Opening 07 June 10am (bookings only)

Fondazione Prada Milano
Largo Isarco 2, 20139

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Alejandro G. Inarritu’s “CARNE y ARENA (Virtually Present, Physically Invisible),” a virtual reality installation produced by Legendary Entertainment and Fondazione Prada, will be presented in its extensive full version at Fondazione Prada in Milan from 7 June 2017 until 15 January 2018, after its world premiere in the 70th Festival de Cannes.

Based on true accounts, the superficial lines between subject and bystander are blurred and bound together, allowing individuals to walk in a vast space and thoroughly live a fragment of the refugees’ personal journeys. “CARNE y ARENA” employs the highest, never-before- used virtual technology to create a large, multi-narrative light space with human characters.

The experimental visual installation “CARNE y ARENA” is a six and half minute solo experience that reunites frequent collaborators Alejandro G. Inarritu and three-time Academy Award®-winning cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki alongside producer Mary Parent and ILMxLAB.

“During the past four years in which this project has been growing in my mind, I had the privilege of meeting and interviewing many Mexican and Central American refugees. Their life stories haunted me, so I invited some of them to collaborate with me in the project,” said four-time Academy Award-winner Inarritu. “My intention was to experiment with VR technology to explore the human condition in an attempt to break the dictatorship of the frame, within which things are just observed, and claim the space to allow the visitor to go through a direct experience walking in the immigrants’ feet, under their skin, and into their hearts.”

As stated by Germano Celant, Fondazione Prada’s Artistic and Scientific Superintendent, “with ‘CARNE y ARENA’, Inarritu turns the exchange between vision and experience into a process of osmosis in which the duality between the organic body and the artificial body is dissolved. A fusion of identities arises: a psychophysical unity in which, by crossing the threshold of the virtual, the human strays into the imaginary and vice versa. It is a revolution in communication in which seeing is transformed into feeling and into a physical engagement with cinema: a transition from the screen to the gaze of the human being, with a total immersion of the senses. Inarritu’s project perfectly embodies Fondazione Prada’s experimental vocation and its long-lasting engagement towards the correlation between cinema, technology and the arts.”

With the inclusion of “CARNE y ARENA” in the Official Selection, Inarritu continues his longstanding history with the Festival de Cannes, having premiered his first feature film, “Amores Perros,” the Critics Week Grand Prize winner, in 2000 and subsequently presented

“Babel,” for which he won the Best Director Award, in 2006, and “Biutiful” in 2010 as part of the Official Selection. Lubezki’s work has also appeared at Cannes in 2000’s “Things You Can Tell Just by Looking at Her,” which won the Un Certain Regard Prize, and in Terrence Malik’s Palme d’Or-winning “The Tree of Life” in 2011.

Access to the installation will only be available via online booking. More detailed info can be found at the following link: http://www.fondazioneprada.org/project/carne-y-arena

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“Walter Leblanc e la Neo-avanguardia Europea”
Curated by Francesca Pola

14 September – 21 October
Monday-Friday
10.30 am - 7 pm

Opening 13 September From 6 pm to 8.30 pm

Corso di Porta Nuova 46/B, 20121

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Cortesi Gallery’s Milan location is pleased to present the work of Walter Leblanc (1932-1986), a cardinal figure in post-war European art whose importance is steadily gaining greater international recognition. This exhibition at Cortesi, curated by Francesca Pola and organized in collaboration with the Walter & Nicole Leblanc Foundation of Brussels, juxtaposes the oeuvre of this Belgian artist with a selection of contemporaries active in the European neo-avant-garde of the 1950s and ’60s, the peers with whom he exchanged ideas and who helped shape the course of his creative career. They include: Getulio Alviani, Marina Apollonio, Alberto Biasi, Agostino Bonalumi, Davide Boriani, Alberto Burri, Antonio Calderara, Enrico Castellani, Gianni Colombo, Dadamaino, Gabriele Devecchi, Piero Dorazio, Lucio Fontana, Heinz Mack, François Morellet, Bruno Munari, Henk Peeters, Ivan Picelj, Otto Piene, Antonio Scaccabarozzi, Jesús Rafael Soto, Günther Uecker, Grazia Varisco and herman de vries.

Starting with his early monochromes in 1958, then above all when “torsion” became the key element shaping his creative process in 1959, Leblanc’s work immediately placed itself at the centre of a debate that was pivotal for the European art world of the time: the question of moving past painting, to radically redefine the very nature of art-making. The artist titled his creations Twisted StringsMobilo-StaticsTorsions SchématiquesStringfields: they are surfaces or sculptures whose rhythm derives from this twisting of the material, in regular progressions that seem to foreshadow an optical or minimalist approach, yet reject the coldness of such compositions, constantly seeking an active connection to the space around them. Different variations on the persuasive geometry that characterizes these works, so precise yet so vibrant, are explored through a wide range of unorthodox materials (such as cotton thread, latex, PVC, metal); the resulting structures look like the inevitable crystallization of a moment of existence, distilled by thought. Moved by this structural, structuring impulse, each work by Leblanc tries to forge an active dialogue with light and air.

Like Leblanc, the generation of European artists that took part in the same revolution also strove for images stripped of all subjective, expressive attributes; they saw the eradication of these aspects (like the wild outpourings of colour or gesture found in the Art Informel movement that had dominated the previous decade) as marking a new beginning, resetting the dial to objectivity. The reduction of formal and expressive elements (dialled back to “zero”) was seen as a crucial way of rebuilding a positive visual language, moving past the historical and cultural disenchantment that had followed World War II, especially in Europe.

For this new generation of artists, it was fundamental to overcome their own subjectivity, to arrive at work that was fully autonomous as a distinct object with its own concrete existence. This led, for instance, to a new conception of the surface as a space for tangible or intangible events, rather than a mere vessel: no longer a passive receptacle for mental leaps and lurches, but the exploration of a conscious freedom.

What emerged from this path of investigation, which could not possibly be exhaustive, was a transnational European vision. It certainly differed from American art, but to some degree even from the Parisian scene dominant at the time; following its own map, it moved between Milan, Rome, Lausanne, Bern, Basel, Düsseldorf, Munich, Frankfurt, London, Rotterdam, Amsterdam, Antwerp, Copenhagen, and Zagreb. This formed a new network of places and ideas, generally characterized by self-run initiatives and spaces: reviews, galleries, and shows conceived and organized directly by the artists, catalogues and invitations that they wrote and designed themselves, exhibitions featuring transportable works that could easily travel from place to place, all of this tending, whenever possible, to forgo even the mediation of critics.

This exhibition was preceded by Walter Leblanc: Sensorial Geometries, a monographic show presented at Cortesi Gallery’s London location (1 June -21 July 2017). The fully illustrated catalogue published by Mousse includes an essay by Francesca Pola, images of the works, installation views, and a bio-bibliographic appendix. Based on extensive art-historical research, it offers a more complete overview and paves the way to further international studies of Leblanc’s work. To round out this book for the exhibition in Milan, a brochure has been published that includes all the works on view, with a new essay by Francesca Pola that puts Leblanc’s work into the context of the European neo-avant-garde.

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Kim Seob Boninsegni - Emanuel Rossetti “Out to Lunch”

21 September – 28 October
Monday – Friday 10.30 am - 5.30 pm
Saturday 2 - 6 pm

Opening 20 September From 6.30 pm

Via del Vecchio Politecnico 3, 20121

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The Istituto Svizzero in Milan is pleased to present “Out to Lunch”, a two-person exhibition by Swiss based artists Emanuel Rossetti (Basel) and Kim Seob Boninsegni (Geneva).

“Out to Lunch” is the first collaboration between the artists and brings together new bodies of work to a place where time and space are distorted, seemingly woven within one another.

In the main room scaffolding activates attention and disturbs the viewer’s perception. On the opposite side ten lightboxes are suspended in niches, with works by both artists. Boninsegni's works play on his identity with glimpses of details in Asian restaurants. Rossetti renders digital drawings into photographs, collaging mere objects within a surreal landscape.

In the second room a sound installation by Boninsegni pervades the space. The artist temporarily ‘squats’ the room; the installation will then provide the space for his new work Casa Pagoda, an abstract science- fiction film which will premiere on the 11th of October.

“Out to Lunch” conjures an image of slow movement. It offers a metaphor for the suspension of time and plays with ideas of proximity. The central scaffolding structure functions to extend time, upholding it, inviting you to rethink its very definition.

Film screening Casa Pagoda by Kim Seob Boninsegni Wednesday 11 October, 18.30

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Jan De Cock “Everything for you, Torino”

20 September – 04 November
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am – 7.00 pm

Opening 19 September From 7 pm to 9 pm

Via Massimiano 25, 20134

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Latifa Echakhch “Underneath”

26 September – 16 November
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am – 7.30 pm

Opening 25 September From 7pm

Via di Porta Tenaglia 7, 20121

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José Parlá “Mirrors”

22 September – 18 November
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am – 7 pm (close 1 – 2.30 pm)

Opening 21 September From 7 pm to 9 pm

Via C. Farini 32, 20159

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“I am interested in discovering and assimilating the overlooked deteriorated layers of advertising on walls fading and withering in the sun. I see the writing on the wall and the storied layers of paint as the psychology of society”.

José Parlá - Brooklyn, NY

Brand New Gallery is pleased and thrilled to present “Mirrors” the first solo exhibition by José Parlá at the gallery.
In Mirrors, Parlá creates a new series of paintings that reinvent the cityscape by exporting parts of walls he found in Italy to his Brooklyn studio in order to create work that interplays and re-contextualizes detritus appropriated and presented as objet trouve? in both abstract paintings and poetic interpretations of places seen by the artist’s eye.

Parlá collected ripped posters he has applied to his work as collage that will be returned to their country of origin using his paintings as the vessels translating his journey from Milan to Rome, Napoli, Matera, Bari, Lecce and Bologna. In these works, Parlá reflects on memories from his travels and imports them back to Italy as carriers of new meaning.

In this exhibition José Parlá pays homage to several artists such as Mimmo Rotella, Isidore Isou, Tristan Tzara, and Burhan Dogançay, and art movements that are close in relation to his practice: New Realism and Lettrism. With these new works Parlá continues to examine ways of how his own art making process over the years has incorporated; writing, texture, collage and Metagraphics with what the Romanian artist and founder of the Lettrist movement Isidore Isou defined as: “[...] encompassing all the means of ideographic, lexical and phonetic notation, supplements the means of expression based on sound by adding a specifically plastic dimension, a visual facet which is irreducible and escapes oral labelling.”

By working in this tradition Parlá captures a ‘visual phonetic poetry’ throughout his art. Isou’s right hand man, Maurice Lemaître, a Lettrist theorist, added that Hypergraphics is an “ensemble of signs capable of transmitting the reality served by the consciousness more exactly than all the former fragmentary and partial practices.”

Enoc Perez “Casitas”

22 September – 18 November
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am – 7 pm (close 1 – 2.30 pm)

Opening 21 September From 7 pm to 9 pm

Via C. Farini 32, 20159

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On view the famous Perez’ series “Casitas”, small-scale oil on canvas works of Puerto Rican architecture.
Perez is best known for his paintings of modernist buildings that nostalgically capture the utopian ambitions and optimism that inspired their construction.
In “Casitas” Perez returns to using a brush, he’s known as a painter “who didn’t use a brush“, drawing on the Warholian legacy of printmaking.
In this series he focalizes his attention on his home land, Puerto Rico, with a selection of semi-abstract but emotionally evocative Puerto Rican architectures, homelands which immigrants have left behind in order to pursue better lives in the US.

The works conjure emotionally-charged memories that Latino immigrants carry with them as they pursue the American dream. These unpretentious paintings are named after places in Puerto Rico, and combine abstract elements with representations of small houses and fences in splattered fields of thick paint in primary colors, which evokes the haunting feeling of a distant past. They are filled with nostalgia, increased by the technique and the colors used by Perez.

Born in San Juan in 1967, Enoc Perez first took painting lessons at the age of eight. Son of an art critic, he spent family vacations traveling to museums in different countries and learning about art history. In 1986, Perez moved to New York to study painting at the Pratt Institute before earning his master’s degree at Hunter College. Finding himself at odds with the program at Hunter, where students and faculty criticized his paintings as overly seductive and decorative, Perez maintained his belief in the importance of the aesthetics in art. Embracing art’s potential for pleasure and beauty, Perez paints sensuous nudes, still lifes, tropical resorts, and modern architectural icons in a sleek aesthetic with dazzling, vibrant colors.

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Ai Weiwei

12 September – 18 November
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am – 7 pm

Opening 11 September From 7 pm to 9 pm

Palazzo Belgioioso
Piazza Belgioioso 2, 20121

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Massimo De Carlo is proud to present a solo exhibition by Ai Weiwei in its Milan gallery in Palazzo Belgioioso.

This is the second show of Ai Weiwei with Massimo De Carlo: the iconic Chinese artist, renowned for his radical work that challenges the political and the contemporary, will present on this occasion a series of sculptures and installations in the historically relevant context of the gallery’s space.

Upon entering the first room, the visitor is confronted with a large-scale sculpture, Garbage Container. The sleek yet daunting object, crafted in huali wood, resembles a wardrobe but in fact offers a tragic commentary on the life of impoverished children in China. Modeled after a garbage container, the work is a tribute to the five homeless children from Guizhou Province who died of carbon monoxide poisoning in 2012, after lighting a fire in a bin to stay warm.

Behind it, stretched on the antique walls of the gallery, is the intricate white and gold wallpaper The Animal That Looks Like a Llama But is Really an Alpaca. The work addresses censorship and free speech by featuring repeated images of surveillance cameras, the Twitter bird logo and an alpaca icon—which since 2009 has become a symbol for the fight for free speech in China.

In the second room, the artist challenges Chinese history and heritage through his pivotal and iconoclastic works Colored Vases and the iconic triptych Dropping a Han Dynasty Urn. In Colored Vases, the artist conceals the history of each ancient vase by dipping them in colourful buckets of industrial paint: the question of the authenticity of the vases mocks and dramatizes the intentional childlike sabotage of history, conveying the political message of the gesture. The same gesture becomes fierce and affirmative in the series of renowned black and white images Dropping a Han Dynasty Urn, produced here in LEGO bricks, where the artist is immortalized destroying an antique Han pot whilst staring stoically at the viewer.

In Free Speech Puzzle, Ai Weiwei uses an ancient craft technique, specifically the Qing dynasty imperial style of hand painting porcelain to create a geomorphic map decorated with the slogan ‘Free Speech’.

In the smaller and more intimate room of the gallery is the most delicate yet strenuous and persistent trace of Ai Weiwei’s protest against the authorities: Bicycle Basket With Flowers in Porcelain immortalizes the 600 days that the artist arranged daily blooms in the bicycle basket outside his studio, protesting against the withholding of his passport by the authorities.

“HOME. An homage to Colin de Land”
John Armleder, Urs Fischer, Jamian Juliano-Villani, Richard Prince, Franz West, Betty Woodman, Andrea Zittel

20 September – 18 November
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am – 7 pm

Opening 19 September From 7 pm to 9 pm

Lambrate/Ventura
Via G. Ventura 5, 20134

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John Armleder “Better, Quasi”

20 September – 18 November
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am – 7 pm

Opening 19 September From 7 pm to 9 pm

Lambrate/Ventura
Via G. Ventura 5, 20134

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Nan Goldin “The Ballad of Sexual Dependency”
Curated by François Hébel - Promoted by Museo di Fotografia Contemporanea

19 September – 26 November
Tuesday – Sunday
10.30 am - 8.30 pm

Opening 18 September From 7 pm

Viale E. Alemagna 6, 20121

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"beings’ weakness, that tells about life, sex, transgression, drugs, friendship, loneliness. A work in progress that started by early Eighties, today known as one of the most important artworks of the history of photography"

The Museum of Contemporary Photography, for the first time in Italy, presents The Ballad of Sexual Dependency by the American photographer Nan Goldin (Washington, 1953), curated by François Hébel.

Nan Goldin gaze holds every moment of her daily life. The artist portraits herself and her mates’ troubled vicissitudes, on the background of Boston, New York, London and Berlin’ downtowns by the ’70 and ’80. Her photography is instinctive, unconcerned about nice form, it goes beyond the appearance, deeply through each situation, without any mediation. Her artistic path totally coincides with the suffered and fascinated biography, without any doubt she gave life to a new photographical genre. Her photography is studied, used and imitated all over the world.

The installation of the project is made by a scenography, which is shaped as an amphitheater, that wraps the visitor on which is projected the video every hour. Graphic material and some original posters from her early performance in New York’s pubs will enrich the exhibition.

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Vettor Pisani
Curated by Piero Tomassoni

19 September – 21 December
Monday – Friday 10 am-7 pm
Saturday by appointment

Opening 18 September From 7 pm to 9 pm

Corso di Porta Nuova 38, 20121

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Cardi Gallery Milan, in collaboration with the Fondazione Morra in Naples, is delighted to present a major retrospective of Vettor Pisani, with works from the 1970s to the 2000s. The exhibition is curated by Piero Tomassoni. Achille Bonito Oliva has contributed an essay to the catalogue.

Eschewing conventional classification within the history of contemporary art, venturing well beyond the temporal and poetic limits of the 1970s, Vettor Pisani (Bari 1934 – Rome 2011) considered himself to be an architect, painter, and playwright. In 1970, Pisani moved to Rome, where he had his first solo exhibition at the gallery La Salita, titled Maschile, femminile e androgino. Incesto e cannibalismo in Marcel Duchamp [Masculine, Feminine and Androgynous: Incest and Cannibalism in Marcel Duchamp]. The exhibition already included many of the themes that the artist would pursue throughout his career. That same year he won the prestigious Pino Pascali Prize and had another solo exhibition at the Castello Svevo in Bari, where he presented his famous work Lo Scorrevole [Zip-line] for the first time. It would later reappear in numerous different versions, starting with Vitalità del Negativo, an exhibition curated by Achille Bonito Oliva at the Palazzo delle Esposizioni in Rome at the end of 1970. The following year, he took part in his first Paris Biennale and began a collaboration with Michelangelo Pistoletto – Plagio [Plagiarism/Subjugation] - that would be staged at Gian Enzo Sperone in Turin, the Frankfurter Kunstverein in Frankfurt, and Galleria Marlborough in Rome. In 1972, Harald Szeemann invited him to participate in Documenta 5, in the Individuelle Mythologien section at the Friedericianum Museum. This was the first year he took part in the Venice Biennale, where he would return in 1976, 1978, 1984, 1986, 1993, and 1995. It also marked the start of a long series of solo and group exhibitions at international institutions (Guggenheim Museum, New York; Hayward Gallery, London; Kunstverein and Lenbachhaus, Munich; Grand Palais, Paris; Museum Folkwang, Essen; Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice; MoMA PS1, New York; Museum of Contemporary Art, Shanghai).

The works presented in this exhibition cover Pisani’s entire career, over four decades. They showcase the breadth of media explored by the artist, from sculpture to installations, from collage to drawing to digital prints. The first part of the exhibition features the installations Agnus Dei and Le Uova di Simona. Omaggio a Georges Bataille [Simona’s Eggs. Homage to Georges Bataille] (1970 and 1976, respectively). These were re-staged and shown by Pisani in Naples in 2011, exploring the themes of nature, poetry and sexuality in what was his last major exhibition before his death. Isola d’Ischia and Isola di Capri, golden bas-reliefs from 1981, are tied to the artist’s memory, embody his nostalgia for the isle of Ischia where he lived as a child. They reveal the alchemic nature that characterises the artist’s work through a prominent use of gold leaf and gold paint.

Large-format digital collages printed on canvas became a part of Pisani’s practice in the 1980s. They testify to the restless, cultured, and strongly intellectual spirit of an artist who took citation, reinterpretation, and appropriation of images as his most prominent stylistic traits. Museo Criminale Francese [French Museum of Crime] (1981), the portrait Cartesio o della stupidità. Meglio un asino vivo che un artista morto [Descartes or on Stupidity: Better a Live Donkey than a Dead Artist] (1987), and the more recent Viaggio nell’Eternità [Journey through Eternity] (1996/2004) and Il mio cuore è un cupo abisso [My Heart is a Dark Pit] (2004), scrutinize the themes of Symbolism and the nuances of nineteenth-century painting. These works reinterpret Boecklin, Moreau and David, metabolising and repositioning them in a contemporary context. Finally, Pisani’s drawings and collages demonstrate the artist’s extraordinary technical skill and his exceptional imaginative power that accompanies his ability to draw upon elements of history and art history. As noted by Piero Tomassoni in the catalogue: “If Borges taught us that life itself is a quotation, Pisani plays on the crueller field of cannibalistic, incestuous appropriation. In his work, the union of genres signifies both the mixture of Romanticism, Surrealism, and behavioural art, and the (con)fusion of male and female in the androgynous – the ideal figure that inspired some of Pisani’s most celebrated works – at the borderline between eroticism and destruction, which, as Bataille notes, are two sides of the same coin”.

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