18 November

Galleries & Museums
2 Brand New Gallery
8 Massimo De Carlo
5 Galleria Raffaella Cortese
25 La Triennale
7 Galleria Monica De Cardenas
15 Marsèlleria
10 Fanta Spazio
24 Tile Project Space
11 Istituto Svizzero
3 Cardi Gallery
14 Gió Marconi
27 ZERO...
20 Pirelli HangarBicocca
21 Fondazione Prada
12 kaufmann repetto
6 Cortesi Gallery
4 Fondazione Carriero
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Brand New Gallery

Via C. Farini 32, 20159

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Brand New Gallery

Via C. Farini 32, 20159

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Massimo De Carlo

Palazzo Belgioioso Piazza Belgioioso, 2, 20121

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Massimo De Carlo

Lambrate/Ventura Via G. Ventura 5, 20134

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Massimo De Carlo

Lambrate/Ventura Via G. Ventura 5, 20134

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Galleria Raffaella Cortese

Via A. Stradella 1, 4, 7, 20129

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La Triennale

Viale E. Alemagna 6, 20121

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La Triennale

Viale E. Alemagna 6, 20121

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Galleria Monica De Cardenas

Via F. Viganò 4, 20124

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Marsèlleria

Via Privata Rezia 2, 20125

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Marsèlleria

Via Paullo 12/A, 20135

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Fanta Spazio

Via Merano 21, 20127

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Tile Project Space

Via Garian 64, 20146

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Istituto Svizzero

Via del Vecchio Politecnico 3, 20121

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Cardi Gallery

Corso di Porta Nuova 38, 20121

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Gió Marconi

Via A. Tadino 20, 20124

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ZERO...

Viale Premuda 46, 20129

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Pirelli HangarBicocca

Via Chiese 2, 20126

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Pirelli HangarBicocca

Via Chiese 2, 20126

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Pirelli HangarBicocca

Via Chiese 2, 20126

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Fondazione Prada

Fondazione Prada Milano Largo Isarco 2, 20139

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Fondazione Prada

Fondazione Prada Largo Isarco 2, 20139

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Fondazione Prada

Fondazione Prada Largo Isarco 2, 20139

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Fondazione Prada

Fondazione Prada/ Osservatorio Fondazione Prada/ Osservatorio, 20121

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kaufmann repetto

Via di Porta Tenaglia 7, 20121

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Cortesi Gallery

Corso di Porta Nuova 46/B, 20121

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Fondazione Carriero

Via Cino del Duca, 4, 20122

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Gió Marconi

Via A. Tadino 20, 20124

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kaufmann repetto

Via di Porta Tenaglia 7, 20121

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Galleria Raffaella Cortese

Via A. Stradella 1, 4, 7, 20129

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Brand New Gallery

Via C. Farini 32, 20159

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Cardi Gallery

Corso di Porta Nuova 38, 20121

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Galleria Monica De Cardenas

Via F. Viganò 4, 20124

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Massimo De Carlo

Via G. Ventura 5 / Palazzo Belgioioso, Piazza Belgioioso 2,

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Pirelli HangarBicocca

Via Chiese 2, 20126

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Istituto Svizzero

Via del Vecchio Politecnico 3, 20121

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Francesca Minini

Via Massimiano 25, 20134

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Galleria Lia Rumma

Via Stilicone 19, 20154

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La Triennale

Viale E. Alemagna 6, 20121

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ZERO...

Viale Premuda 46, 20129

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Marsèlleria

Via privata Rezia 2, 20135

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Fondazione Prada

Largo Isarco 2, 20139 / Osservatorio Fondazione Prada,

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Fondazione Carriero

Via Cino del Duca, 4, 20122

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Fanta Spazio

Via Merano 21, 20127

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Tile Project Space

Via Garian 64, 20146

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Armada

Via Privata Don Bartolomeo Grazioli 73, 20161

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MEGA

Piazza Vetra 21, 20123

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Federica Schiavo Gallery

Via Barozzi 6, 20122

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Cortesi Gallery

Corso di Porta Nuova 46/B, 20121

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10 Corso Como

Corso Como 10 - 20154

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Bar Basso

Via Plinio 39 - 20129

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La Belle Aurore

Via Privata G. Abamonti 1 - 20129

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Fioraio Bianchi Caffè

Via Montebello 7 - 20121

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Charmant

Via G. Colombo 42 - 20133

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Grand Hotel et de Milan

Via A. Manzoni 29 - 20121

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Lile in cucina

Via F. Guicciardini 5 - 20129

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Panificio Davide Longoni

Via G. Tiraboschi 19 - 20135

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Pasticceria Marchesi

Via Santa Maria alla Porta 11a - 20123

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Trattoria Masuelli San Marco

Viale Umbria 80 - 20135

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La Nuova Arena

Piazza Lega Lombarda 5 - 20154

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Pavé

Via F. Casati 27 - 20124

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Antica Trattoria della Pesa

Viale Pasubio 10 - 20154

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Picchio

Via Melzo 11 - 20129

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Piero e Pia

Piazza D. Aspari 2 - 20129

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Polpetta DOC

Via B. Eustachi 8 - 20129

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Osteria del Treno

Via San Gregorio 46 - 20124

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Fonderia Artistica Battaglia

Via Stilicone 10 - 20154

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Pasticceria Cucchi

Corso Genova 1 - 20123

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Otto

Via Paolo Sarpi 10 - 20154

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DRY Cocktails & Pizza

Via Solferino 33 - 20121

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Capetown Café

Via Vigevano 3 - 20144

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Pisacco

Via Solferino 48 - 20121

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CONVERSO

CLS Architetti - San Paolo Converso Piazza S. Eufemia, Milano - 20122

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​LùBar

Via Palestro, 16 - 20121

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José Parlá “Mirrors”

22 September – 18 November
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am – 7 pm (close 1 – 2.30 pm)

Opening 21 September From 7 pm to 9 pm

Via C. Farini 32, 20159

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“I am interested in discovering and assimilating the overlooked deteriorated layers of advertising on walls fading and withering in the sun. I see the writing on the wall and the storied layers of paint as the psychology of society”.

José Parlá - Brooklyn, NY

Brand New Gallery is pleased and thrilled to present “Mirrors” the first solo exhibition by José Parlá at the gallery.
In Mirrors, Parlá creates a new series of paintings that reinvent the cityscape by exporting parts of walls he found in Italy to his Brooklyn studio in order to create work that interplays and re-contextualizes detritus appropriated and presented as objet trouvé in both abstract paintings and poetic interpretations of places seen by the artist’s eye.

Parlá collected ripped posters he has applied to his work as collage that will be returned to their country of origin using his paintings as the vessels translating his journey from Milan to Rome, Napoli, Matera, Bari, Lecce and Bologna. In these works, Parlá reflects on memories from his travels and imports them back to Italy as carriers of new meaning.

In this exhibition José Parlá pays homage to several artists such as Mimmo Rotella, Isidore Isou, Tristan Tzara, and Burhan Dogançay, and art movements that are close in relation to his practice: New Realism and Lettrism. With these new works Parlá continues to examine ways of how his own art making process over the years has incorporated; writing, texture, collage and Metagraphics with what the Romanian artist and founder of the Lettrist movement Isidore Isou defined as: “[...] encompassing all the means of ideographic, lexical and phonetic notation, supplements the means of expression based on sound by adding a specifically plastic dimension, a visual facet which is irreducible and escapes oral labelling.”

By working in this tradition Parlá captures a ‘visual phonetic poetry’ throughout his art. Isou’s right hand man, Maurice Lemaître, a Lettrist theorist, added that Hypergraphics is an “ensemble of signs capable of transmitting the reality served by the consciousness more exactly than all the former fragmentary and partial practices.”

Enoc Perez “Casitas”

22 September – 18 November
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am – 7 pm (close 1 – 2.30 pm)

Opening 21 September From 7 pm to 9 pm

Via C. Farini 32, 20159

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On view the famous Perez’ series “Casitas”, small-scale oil on canvas works of Puerto Rican architecture.
Perez is best known for his paintings of modernist buildings that nostalgically capture the utopian ambitions and optimism that inspired their construction.
In “Casitas” Perez returns to using a brush, he’s known as a painter “who didn’t use a brush“, drawing on the Warholian legacy of printmaking.
In this series he focalizes his attention on his home land, Puerto Rico, with a selection of semi-abstract but emotionally evocative Puerto Rican architectures, homelands which immigrants have left behind in order to pursue better lives in the US.

The works conjure emotionally-charged memories that Latino immigrants carry with them as they pursue the American dream. These unpretentious paintings are named after places in Puerto Rico, and combine abstract elements with representations of small houses and fences in splattered fields of thick paint in primary colors, which evokes the haunting feeling of a distant past. They are filled with nostalgia, increased by the technique and the colors used by Perez.

Born in San Juan in 1967, Enoc Perez first took painting lessons at the age of eight. Son of an art critic, he spent family vacations traveling to museums in different countries and learning about art history. In 1986, Perez moved to New York to study painting at the Pratt Institute before earning his master’s degree at Hunter College. Finding himself at odds with the program at Hunter, where students and faculty criticized his paintings as overly seductive and decorative, Perez maintained his belief in the importance of the aesthetics in art. Embracing art’s potential for pleasure and beauty, Perez paints sensuous nudes, still lifes, tropical resorts, and modern architectural icons in a sleek aesthetic with dazzling, vibrant colors.

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Ai Weiwei

12 September – 18 November
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am – 7 pm

Opening 11 September From 7 pm to 9 pm

Palazzo Belgioioso
Piazza Belgioioso, 2, 20121

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Massimo De Carlo is proud to present a solo exhibition by Ai Weiwei in its Milan gallery in Palazzo Belgioioso.

This is the second show of Ai Weiwei with Massimo De Carlo: the iconic Chinese artist, renowned for his radical work that challenges the political and the contemporary, will present on this occasion a series of sculptures and installations in the historically relevant context of the gallery’s space.

Upon entering the first room, the visitor is confronted with a large-scale sculpture, Garbage Container. The sleek yet daunting object, crafted in huali wood, resembles a wardrobe but in fact offers a tragic commentary on the life of impoverished children in China. Modeled after a garbage container, the work is a tribute to the five homeless children from Guizhou Province who died of carbon monoxide poisoning in 2012, after lighting a fire in a bin to stay warm.

Behind it, stretched on the antique walls of the gallery, is the intricate white and gold wallpaper The Animal That Looks Like a Llama But is Really an Alpaca. The work addresses censorship and free speech by featuring repeated images of surveillance cameras, the Twitter bird logo and an alpaca icon—which since 2009 has become a symbol for the fight for free speech in China.

In the second room, the artist challenges Chinese history and heritage through his pivotal and iconoclastic works Colored Vases and the iconic triptych Dropping a Han Dynasty Urn. In Colored Vases, the artist conceals the history of each ancient vase by dipping them in colourful buckets of industrial paint: the question of the authenticity of the vases mocks and dramatizes the intentional childlike sabotage of history, conveying the political message of the gesture. The same gesture becomes fierce and affirmative in the series of renowned black and white images Dropping a Han Dynasty Urn, produced here in LEGO bricks, where the artist is immortalized destroying an antique Han pot whilst staring stoically at the viewer.

In Free Speech Puzzle, Ai Weiwei uses an ancient craft technique, specifically the Qing dynasty imperial style of hand painting porcelain to create a geomorphic map decorated with the slogan ‘Free Speech’.

In the smaller and more intimate room of the gallery is the most delicate yet strenuous and persistent trace of Ai Weiwei’s protest against the authorities: Bicycle Basket With Flowers in Porcelain immortalizes the 600 days that the artist arranged daily blooms in the bicycle basket outside his studio, protesting against the withholding of his passport by the authorities.

“HOME. An homage to Colin de Land”
John Armleder, Urs Fischer, Jamian Juliano-Villani, Richard Prince, Franz West, Betty Woodman, Andrea Zittel

20 September – 16 December
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am – 7 pm

Opening 19 September From 7 pm to 9 pm

Lambrate/Ventura
Via G. Ventura 5, 20134

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John Armleder “Better, Quasi”

20 September – 16 December
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am – 7 pm

Opening 19 September From 7 pm to 9 pm

Lambrate/Ventura
Via G. Ventura 5, 20134

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Keren Cytter and Nora Schultz “Continental Break”

29 September – 23 November
Tuesday – Saturday
10 am-7.30 pm (closed 1-3 pm)

Opening 28 September From 7 pm to 9 pm

Via A. Stradella 1, 4, 7, 20129

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Gallery Raffaella Cortese is pleased to announce the show Continental Break, an unseen joint project by Keren Cytter and Nora Schultz. This exhibition is the third one that Keren Cytter presents in the gallery, while it is the first time Nora Schultz works in these spaces.

After several years of friendship and collaborations, the artists decided to develop, for the first time ever, a collective project that blends their artistic researches. Reality and fiction are merged in their work in such a deep way that it is impossible to discern one from the other, creating a new reality in which the viewers recognize moments of their own lives.

Keren Cytter’s films, video installations and drawings represent our social reality through experimental narrative modes. The artist has especially worked with the media of the video in an innovative and meaningful manner, making use of a dreamlike, ironic and enigmatic language. Her works fascinate as much as they confuse, carrying the viewers through a world of broken reflections and overwhelming actions but deeply realistic.

Nora Schultz also develops her works starting from daily life, especially for the materials choosen: concrete, plastic, sheet metal, paper, felt, but also ready-made objects such as roller shutters or clothes. These are just some of the materials used for her sculptures, undressed of their usual function. Nora Schultz creates a change of context, not with the intention of alienation, but rather an extension of the possibilities of interpretation.

One of the two videos by Keren Cytter is showed in the center of the space n. 7 and projeted onto a reflective material scattering lights and colors in the environment. The four-handed drawings display the shapes of the continents with synthetic and playful features but at the same time immediately recognizable by our visual memory. Also these works are realized on a reflective paper and imbued of the light of the video creating reflections in the space which striking Nora Schultz’s hanging sculptures in an endless game of lights and shades. In the room’s corner some curtains painted by the artists close off a small portion of the space from which the audio of Keren Cytter’s second video invites us to enter. This is projected onto a structure designed and built by Nora Schultz; its uneven and sharp surface plays with the images of the video, shattering and confusing them, almost giving a visual image to Keren Cytter’s narrative.

The space n. 4 will feature the important work MOP (Museum of Photography), an archive made up of 800 polaroids taken with a Polaroid 1200i by Keren Cytter during her travels through Berlin, London, the USA and Israel from 2012 to 2013. People, objects, places, transports, homes, hotels and food become witnesses of a daily wholly lived, between travels, work, relationships and all aspects of our lives, told though images of important moments.

Nora Schultz works in the space n. 1 in a minimal way featuring the Sci-fi-interview drawings and the Tripod sculpture, placed in the center of the hall. All these works tell a suspended, unrealistic and passionate story, without a linear tale, but with a broken, enigmatic, ironic and engaging narration, like in Keren Cytter’s video works and MOP. The Tripod becomes a living creature, able of moving and escaping from the exhibition space, while the drawings are maps of these unlikely paths.

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Grazia Varisco “Allineamenti scorrevoli ricorrenti”
Curated by Elena Volpato

06 October – 23 November
Tuesday – Sunday
10.30 am - 8.30 pm

Opening 05 October From 7 pm

Viale E. Alemagna 6, 20121

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Nan Goldin “The Ballad of Sexual Dependency”
Curated by François Hébel - Promoted by Museo di Fotografia Contemporanea

19 September – 26 November
Tuesday – Sunday
10.30 am - 8.30 pm

Opening 18 September From 7 pm

Viale E. Alemagna 6, 20121

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"beings’ weakness, that tells about life, sex, transgression, drugs, friendship, loneliness. A work in progress that started by early Eighties, today known as one of the most important artworks of the history of photography"

The Museum of Contemporary Photography, for the first time in Italy, presents The Ballad of Sexual Dependency by the American photographer Nan Goldin (Washington, 1953), curated by François Hébel.

Nan Goldin gaze holds every moment of her daily life. The artist portraits herself and her mates’ troubled vicissitudes, on the background of Boston, New York, London and Berlin’ downtowns by the ’70 and ’80. Her photography is instinctive, unconcerned about nice form, it goes beyond the appearance, deeply through each situation, without any mediation. Her artistic path totally coincides with the suffered and fascinated biography, without any doubt she gave life to a new photographical genre. Her photography is studied, used and imitated all over the world.

The installation of the project is made by a scenography, which is shaped as an amphitheater, that wraps the visitor on which is projected the video every hour. Graphic material and some original posters from her early performance in New York’s pubs will enrich the exhibition.

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Chantal Joffe

29 September – 25 November
Tuesday – Saturday
10 am – 7 pm (closed 1 – 3 pm) / Sat. 12 – 7 pm

Opening 28 September From 6.30 pm

Via F. Viganò 4, 20124

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Monica De Cardenas is delighted to announce an exhibition of new work by British painter Chantal Joffe. Joffe is known for her portraits, painted in a fluid, smooth style, in which she is able to capture the emotions, weaknesses and vitality of human existence. Her subjects are often female: girls, adolescents and women seen in different moments of life. The artist depicts them with a gaze that is halfway between the immediacy of a snapshot and a situation of emphatic distortion. These studies on the human condition express no judgments, but appear one after the other with great energy and engagement, also thanks to the bold rejection of any formal order. The psychological intensity of the figures makes our very opinion ambiguous, disturbing and gratifying us at the same time. With influences ranging from Piero della Francesca to Edgar Degas and from Francis Bacon to Alex Katz, Joffe has based her work on a direct and intimate observational relationship between the painter and her sitter. Mostly her subjects are family members and personal friends, sometimes images from historical figures or the mass media. She is also engaged in a series of candid, often searing self-portraits and tender double portraits with her daughter Esme. Whatever their origin, her subjects have the intensity and psychological richness of characters, like instants captured from the lives of literary heroines. Within this subject area, Joffe experiments widely with form, color, texture and approach. The paintings swing between the poles of forethought and improvisation, as flurries of brushstrokes repeatedly clash and fuse across the canvas’s arena of action. Although drawing is important to her, she never delineates her forms, but rather allows color and shape to merge as a cumulation of her imaginative process. As she told The Independent in 2014: “I paint to think”. A group of new pastels is collectively titled ‘Family Pictures’. Joffe has described the mesmeric and physical, arm-straining experience of their making, the thickly applied chalk accumulating with a dusty, luminous purity. There is a sense of democratic, mobile immediacy about these sticks of pigment, the looser strokes they occasion turning clothes, or the stripes of a beach hut, towards abstraction even as they retain the sense of gesture and place of their making. Here again, experience and artistic form, emotional connection and representation, are suspended in lively, irresolvable association on Joffe’s picture plane, which accommodates all manner of psychological and spatio-temporal complexities.

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“Rose Boquet - independent art projects gathering”
Curated by Carolina Ongaro and Andrea Magnani

16 November – 26 November
Monday – Friday
10am-6pm (closed 1-2 pm)

Opening 15 November From 7pm to 9pm

Via Privata Rezia 2, 20125

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London: Jupiter Woods, Almanac, Clearview, Auto Italia

Milano: Current, Fanta, Idioletta, Mega, 77, Siliqoon, Tile

With Rose Bouquet we inaugurate a preliminary mapping process - one of encounter and dialogue between artistic contexts which, though geographically distant, share missions and intentions, and an aptitude to rethink and continuously rework organisational structures, both existing and fictional ones.

Independent spaces based in Milan and London are invited to gather and enter in conversation, to open up a collective reflection that evokes personified roles, and the processes and methodologies inaugurated by these structures, wherein institutional hierarchies leave space to new dynamics of production, collaboration and presentation.

The project is structured through an initial phase of a two-day workshop open to the public (booking required). Spaces and projects will be invited to gather, narrate themselves and reflect together. The days of workshop will unfold a reflection focused on three major themes: dynamics, geographies, contents. The forms will be the baggage carried into the context of this encounter: a sort of self portrait of intrinsic processes and dynamics active within each organization, utilised as a trigger for a first dialogue during the initial workshop, and worked upon in the following phases. The outcomes so generated will be available for the public to visit and consult in the form of exhibition for the following days, attempting the creation of a collective portrait.

- Organised by Carolina Ongaro (Jupiter Woods) and Andrea Magnani (Siliqoon)

Norma Jeane “The Soft Machine”

26 October – 15 December
Monday – Friday
10am-6pm (closed 1-2 pm)

Opening 25 October 7-9 pm

Via Paullo 12/A, 20135

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La macchina, icona del concetto di hardware, assume una nuova aura. Le ricerche comunemente riunite nella definizione di Intelligenza Artificiale stanno trasformando questi oggetti, storicamente considerati come meri strumenti al servizio della nostra specie, in soggetti con nuovi margini di imprevedibilità.

Questa mutazione si colloca sul versante della rappresentazione che noi (umani) elaboriamo nella sfera emotiva e, inevitabilmente, estende il perimetro di ciò che definiamo “artificiale” a oggetti la cui peculiarità non è solo utilitaristica ma anche estetica, simbolica, sensuale, comunicativa e spirituale.

Gli “artefatti” hanno quindi il potere di modificare la nostra rappresentazione del mondo e di noi stessi. Ha dunque senso perseverare nel dualismo naturale/artificiale? La tecnologia non è forse parte integrante della nostra umanità? E non contribuisce in modo sostanziale al modo con cui ci vediamo?

Questa morbida seduzione contemporanea è la materia di The Soft Machine, una mostra che vede intrecciarsi due opere di Norma Jeane, ShyBot (2017) e Black Sheep Orgone Blanket (2017), in un abbraccio tra tecnologia, cultura e identità. 

Norma Jeane è un alias ispirato al lato privato e oscuro della più luminosa tra le icone pop.
La complessità contraddittoria della quotidianità è il campo di indagine delle sue opere che sono state mostrate in numerose istituzioni pubbliche e private internazionali tra le quali MoMA, P.S.1 e Swiss Institute, New York; Palais de Tokyo, Parigi; Helmhaus, Zurigo; Frieze Project, Londra; Schirn Kunsthalle, Francoforte; Martin Gropius Bau, Berlino; Culture Station 284, Seul; Galleria Continua, Pechino e Les Moulins; Palazzo delle Esposizioni, Roma; Biennale di Lione, Biennale di Venezia, Biennale di Liverpool, Biennale Socle du Monde, Herning/DK e Desert X Biennial, Palm Springs.

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Machines are the icon of the hardware concept, progressively taking on a new aura. The researches commonly gathering around the definition of Artificial Intelligence are transforming these objects, historically considered as mere instruments to service useful objectives of our species, into subjects presenting new unpredictability fringes. 

This mutation is to be found on the side of the representation which we (humans) develop in our emotive scope. Unavoidably, this extends the boundary of what we define as “artificial” to objects which main feature is not only utilitarian, but also aesthetic, symbolic, sensual, communicative and spiritual. 

The “artifacts” do have the power to change our representation of the world, and with this also of ourselves. Does it then make sense to persist with the dualism of natural/artificial? Technology isn’t maybe an essential part of our humanity? And doesn’t it significantly contribute to the way we see ourselves? 

This soft contemporary seduction is the material for The Soft Machine, an exhibition where two works by Norma Jeane, ShyBot (2017) and Black Sheep Orgone Blanket (2017) intertwine in an embrace among technology, culture and identity.

Norma Jeane is an alias inspired by the most private and dark side of the shiniest of the pop icons. The contradictory complexity of daily life is the investigation field of her works which have been displayed at different international public and private institutions such as MoMA, P.S.1 and Swiss Institute, New York; Palais de Tokyo, Paris; Helmhaus, Zurich; Frieze Project, London; Schirn Kunsthalle, Frankfurt; Martin Gropius Bau, Berlin; Culture Station 284, Seul; Galleria Continua, Beijing and Les Moulins; Palazzo delle Esposizioni, Rome; Lion Biennial, Biennale di Venezia, Liverpool Biennial, Socle du Monde Biennial, Herning/DK and Desert X Biennial, Palm Springs. 

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Margherita Raso “Piercing”

30 September – 03 December
Saturday - Sunday
15-19 or by appointment

Opening 29 September From 7pm

Via Merano 21, 20127

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“Piercing” è sostantivo e verbo.
“To pierce” significa perforare, attraversare. Creare un’apertura, una rottura, un vuoto nel quale insinuare un corpo estraneo, testando la possibile aderenza fra due superfici a contatto.

Margherita Raso interviene nello spazio ragionando sulla sua natura – come luogo di passaggio e di riparo - riconducendolo alla sua architettura essenziale per occuparlo con un gesto che ne altera la configurazione.

In questo tentativo d’insediamento il corpo diventa l’unità di misura fondamentale: la sua capacità di muoversi e di segnare una superficie viene registrata sul tessuto che ricopre la volta, in una composizione che si fa sempre più frenetica man mano che sale verso l’alto.

La traccia di questo movimento è spinta, attraverso la ripetizione, in una figura i cui contorni si sovrappongono. Restituita in forma scultorea, essa torna corpo in movimento nell’istante in cui il tessuto penetra nello spazio, aggrappandovisi per forza magnetica.

A interessare Margherita sono le possibili zone di contatto fra azioni in tensione reciproca quali lo scolpire e il modellare, l’intuizione e il rigore compositivo, il continuo comprimersi e dilatarsi di spazio e tempo.

In questa operazione, l’artista indaga la possibilità di afferrare un’immagine, di metterla sotto sforzo creando delle frizioni che le permettano di sfiorarne i confini.

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Giulio Scalisi “Alghe Romantiche”

04 October – 15 December
Open only by appointment

Via Garian 64, 20146

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Tile Project Space is pleased to present Alghe Romantiche, the first solo show by Giulio Scalisi.
The artist imagined the space as an underwater environment inhabited by fish with rafts floating on it. The project, composed by a series of sculptures and a video, tries to deconstruct the aseptic and virtual world created by mankind to face the complexity of its existence. The weight of gravity, the complexity of perception and the violence of reality have all been sterilised by depriving everyone of their own emotions, now objectified and commodified as images ready for consumption. Contemporary society, scared of the caos caused by excitement and beauty, has lost the ability to cry. They now spend their time looking at themselves and at a mediated world through a mirror — in an infinite flow exemplified by the luminous screen that everyday is able to capture and distract our eyes. If man is no longer able to look without mediation, images have become the main vehicle to build perfect experiences and hide the difficulties and deficiencies of our real lives. Scalisi's work brings the viewer into a virtual place, a mirror-ocean that is gradually revealed through the encounter with characters who, captives of their own assigned identity, exemplify the several stages of the journey undertaken by human beings in their departure from the concrete world.
A drop of rain, moving boats, fish dancing with pictures, seaweeds, the remains of a sea monster and a youngster on a raft... they portray a picture of the state of things. Without looking for a solution, the artist tries to observe the human world from a decentralised point of view, seeing in this act the possible escape from the ceaseless categorisation to which every complexity is destined, humans being the first.
The exhibition is a reflection on the ocean behind every screen and on the emotions and fears that make up the intimacy of an young contemporary man.

Tile Project Space è lieta di presentare Alghe Romantiche, prima mostra personale di Giulio Scalisi.
L'artista ha immaginato lo spazio come un ambiente sottomarino abitato da pesci e sovrastato da zattere. Composto da una serie di sculture e un video, il progetto tenta di decostruire il mondo asettico e virtuale creato dall'essere umano per fronteggiare la complessità della sua esistenza. Il peso della gravità, l’eccesso di percezione e la violenza della realtà sono state sterilizzate allontanando ognuno dalle proprie emozioni ora destinate ad essere mercificate e oggettivate in immagini pronte al consumo. La società contemporanea, per la paura di emozionarsi e incontrare la bellezza, ha perso la capacità di piangere trovandosi così a specchiarsi in un flusso infinito esemplificato dallo scroll luminoso che quotidianamente cattura e distrae i nostri occhi. Se l'uomo non è più in grado di guardare, le immagini invece sono diventate il principale veicolo per costruire esperienze perfette e nascondere le mancanze e le difficoltà delle nostre vite reali. Il lavoro di Scalisi accompagna lo spettatore alla scoperta di un luogo virtuale, un oceano/specchio che viene progressivamente svelato attraverso l'incontro di personaggi che, prigionieri e passivi della propria identità, esemplificano diversi stadi del viaggio intrapreso dall'essere umano nel suo allontanamento dal mondo concreto. Una goccia, barche in transito, pesci che danzano con immagini, alghe, resti di un mostro marino e un ragazzino su una zattera vanno a comporre il ritratto di uno stato delle cose. Senza cercare una soluzione, l’artista tenta di osservare il mondo umano da un punto di vista decentrato guardando a questo atto come la possibile via di fuga dall'incessante definizione a cui ogni complessità è destinata, per prima quella umana. La mostra è una riflessione sull'oceano che sta dietro ogni schermo e sulle emozioni e le paure che compongono l'intimità di un giovane uomo contemporaneo.

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Balthasar Burkhard

16 November – 17 December
Monday – Friday 10.30 am - 5.30 pm
Saturday 2 - 6 pm

Opening 15 November From 6.30pm

Via del Vecchio Politecnico 3, 20121

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Istituto Svizzero is pleased to present an exhibition by the late Swiss artist Balthasar Burkhard, which brings together two bodies of work.

The first, for which Burkhard received international recognition, is a collection of medium and large-format monochromatic photographs of city landscapes in which he captures the immensity of the world: the “Naples” series (1998) and the “Mexico” series (1999). Complementing these pieces are his late works; still-life photographs of flowers, which reveal a different eye and sensitivity. Portraying three different flowers from different parts of the world—Lisianthus, 2009, Japanese Iris, 2009 and Phlox, 2009—they recall a baroque sensibility and are characterized by rich, deep colours and intense light and dark shadows.

The show also acts as a starting point for a broader reflection on photographic reproduction in the context of the exhibition as a medium.

 

L’Istituto Svizzero presenta due corpi di lavori di Balthasar Burkhard, artista svizzero scomparso di recente.

Il primo corpo, per cui Burkhard ha ricevuto riconoscimento internazionale, è una collezione di fotografie monocromatiche di medio e grande formato che hanno per soggetto paesaggi urbani e nelle quali immortala l’immensità del mondo: la serie “Napoli” (1998) e la serie “Mexico” (1999). Assieme a questi lavori, le sue opere più recenti; fotografie still-life di fiori che svelano un occhio e una sensibilità diversa.

Raffigurando tre fiori da parti del mondo differenti – Lisianthus, 2009, Japanese Iris, 2009 e Phlox, 2009 – l’artista richiama una sensibilità barocca; i fiori sono caratterizzati da colori intensi e vivi e da forti contrasti di luce e ombra.

L’esposizione vuole essere anche spunto per una riflessione più ampia sulla riproduzione fotografica nel contesto della mostra come medium.

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Vettor Pisani
Curated by Piero Tomassoni

19 September – 21 December
Monday – Friday 10 am-7 pm
Saturday by appointment

Opening 18 September From 7 pm to 9 pm

Corso di Porta Nuova 38, 20121

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Cardi Gallery Milan, in collaboration with the Fondazione Morra in Naples, is delighted to present a major retrospective of Vettor Pisani, with works from the 1970s to the 2000s. The exhibition is curated by Piero Tomassoni. Achille Bonito Oliva has contributed an essay to the catalogue.

Eschewing conventional classification within the history of contemporary art, venturing well beyond the temporal and poetic limits of the 1970s, Vettor Pisani (Bari 1934 – Rome 2011) considered himself to be an architect, painter, and playwright. In 1970, Pisani moved to Rome, where he had his first solo exhibition at the gallery La Salita, titled Maschile, femminile e androgino. Incesto e cannibalismo in Marcel Duchamp [Masculine, Feminine and Androgynous: Incest and Cannibalism in Marcel Duchamp]. The exhibition already included many of the themes that the artist would pursue throughout his career. That same year he won the prestigious Pino Pascali Prize and had another solo exhibition at the Castello Svevo in Bari, where he presented his famous work Lo Scorrevole [Zip-line] for the first time. It would later reappear in numerous different versions, starting with Vitalità del Negativo, an exhibition curated by Achille Bonito Oliva at the Palazzo delle Esposizioni in Rome at the end of 1970. The following year, he took part in his first Paris Biennale and began a collaboration with Michelangelo Pistoletto – Plagio [Plagiarism/Subjugation] - that would be staged at Gian Enzo Sperone in Turin, the Frankfurter Kunstverein in Frankfurt, and Galleria Marlborough in Rome. In 1972, Harald Szeemann invited him to participate in Documenta 5, in the Individuelle Mythologien section at the Friedericianum Museum. This was the first year he took part in the Venice Biennale, where he would return in 1976, 1978, 1984, 1986, 1993, and 1995. It also marked the start of a long series of solo and group exhibitions at international institutions (Guggenheim Museum, New York; Hayward Gallery, London; Kunstverein and Lenbachhaus, Munich; Grand Palais, Paris; Museum Folkwang, Essen; Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice; MoMA PS1, New York; Museum of Contemporary Art, Shanghai).

The works presented in this exhibition cover Pisani’s entire career, over four decades. They showcase the breadth of media explored by the artist, from sculpture to installations, from collage to drawing to digital prints. The first part of the exhibition features the installations Agnus Dei and Le Uova di Simona. Omaggio a Georges Bataille [Simona’s Eggs. Homage to Georges Bataille] (1970 and 1976, respectively). These were re-staged and shown by Pisani in Naples in 2011, exploring the themes of nature, poetry and sexuality in what was his last major exhibition before his death. Isola d’Ischia and Isola di Capri, golden bas-reliefs from 1981, are tied to the artist’s memory, embody his nostalgia for the isle of Ischia where he lived as a child. They reveal the alchemic nature that characterises the artist’s work through a prominent use of gold leaf and gold paint.

Large-format digital collages printed on canvas became a part of Pisani’s practice in the 1980s. They testify to the restless, cultured, and strongly intellectual spirit of an artist who took citation, reinterpretation, and appropriation of images as his most prominent stylistic traits. Museo Criminale Francese [French Museum of Crime] (1981), the portrait Cartesio o della stupidità. Meglio un asino vivo che un artista morto [Descartes or on Stupidity: Better a Live Donkey than a Dead Artist] (1987), and the more recent Viaggio nell’Eternità [Journey through Eternity] (1996/2004) and Il mio cuore è un cupo abisso [My Heart is a Dark Pit] (2004), scrutinize the themes of Symbolism and the nuances of nineteenth-century painting. These works reinterpret Boecklin, Moreau and David, metabolising and repositioning them in a contemporary context. Finally, Pisani’s drawings and collages demonstrate the artist’s extraordinary technical skill and his exceptional imaginative power that accompanies his ability to draw upon elements of history and art history. As noted by Piero Tomassoni in the catalogue: “If Borges taught us that life itself is a quotation, Pisani plays on the crueller field of cannibalistic, incestuous appropriation. In his work, the union of genres signifies both the mixture of Romanticism, Surrealism, and behavioural art, and the (con)fusion of male and female in the androgynous – the ideal figure that inspired some of Pisani’s most celebrated works – at the borderline between eroticism and destruction, which, as Bataille notes, are two sides of the same coin”.

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Wade Guyton “Siamo arrivati, in forma abbreviata”

04 November – 22 December
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am – 7 pm

Opening 03 November From 6pm to 9pm

Via A. Tadino 20, 20124

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Gio Marconi is pleased to announce Wade Guyton’s third solo exhibition with the gallery: Siamo arrivati, in forma abbreviata.

Siamo arrivati, Guyton’s first solo show in a public Italian institution, the Museo Madre in Naples, was on view earlier this year. There the artist used the museum as a studio and worked in the galleries for two months producing new works.

At the end of the exhibition, the ten largest works could not fit through the doors of the museum and needed to be unstretched and rolled. Guyton used the gallery in Milan to re-stretch these works and decided to show these ten paintings together. Taken out of the original installation in Naples, the experience of these works is concentrated.

These paintings include images of the museum’s galleries that Guyton used as a studio, the windows he asked the museum to reveal, the temporary Wi-Fi routers installed on the walls, works in progress on the floor, a page of the online edition of Il Mattino, a night view of via Giovanni Nicotera where the artist lived, enlarged fragments of digital bitmap files, and the towels used to soak up excess ink. One painting is a black monochrome comprised of rejected layers of imagery.

The museum stated:

In these works, however, the equilibrium between representation and abstraction becomes precarious, oscillating between photography and painting, with their respective representational codes. The aim seems indeed to transform them into embryonic and hybrid icons, into palimpsests of the contemporary digital episteme. Produced in almost real time by the artist and his team while the exhibition was being mounted, these works express the potential and contradictions of contemporary digital visual language – in which abstraction and representation, the daily chronicle and suspension of time, identity and reproducibility, singularity and multiplicity overlap. They document the expansion and diversification of the ways in which digital language shapes our knowledge of reality, like the statutes of reality itself – which have become ephemeral, hypothetical, artificial and merely virtual.

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Arranged by the artist within the third floor of Madre, these works transform the solidity and the authority of the museum space into a welcoming place of daily work, a malleable and rewritable architectural loop. The exhibition interconnects with architecture according to the rhythmic series of paintings and work tools (tables, furniture) that are reconceived by the artist and his team into devices for the exhibition itself. Like the transformation of the rooms of the museum into a workshop, which temporarily replaces his studio in New York, the residency of the artist and his team in Naples becomes the conceptual blueprint of a critical and (self-) analytical space-time framework. This is Guyton’s setting for creating this new group of works in real time; he defines the practical conditions of work and the technological resources required to gain access to the sources of information and, therefore, of representation and production. In this way, Guyton reinterprets both the classic art-historical theme of the “studio” and the possible reference to the tradition of the Grand Tour: This also could explain the ironic and self-ironic plural title of the exhibition, SIAMO ARRIVATI (“We Have Arrived”), which is taken from the slogan used by McDonald’s to announce the recent opening of its restaurants in Naples.

One could think of Guyton's residency and exhibition in Naples as a potential allegory of the contemporary digital and global inter- and hyper-connection, and that he performs the possible outcomes by making a comparison with the history of a city situated at the center of the Mediterranean and therefore immersed, in itself, in thousands of layers of social, economic, political and cultural interconnections.

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The Sun and the Rainfall II
Enzo Cucchi, Hubert Duprat, Giuseppe Gabellone, Francesco Gennari, Elizabeth Jaeger, Egill Sæbjörnsson

29 September – 22 December
Tuesday – Friday
11 am - 7 pm (closed 1.30-2.30 pm)

Opening 28 September From 7pm to 9pm

Viale Premuda 46, 20129

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“Take Me (I’m Yours)”
Curated by Christian Boltanski, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Chiara Parisi, Roberta Tenconi

01 November – 14 January
Thursday – Sunday
10 am-10 pm

Opening 31 October From 7 pm

Via Chiese 2, 20126

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Pirelli HangarBicocca presents “Take Me (I’m Yours)” a group exhibition that rewrites the rulebook for experiencing a work of art. Visitors are invited to flout convention and do all the things they aren’t normally allowed to do in a museum.

In “Take Me (I’m Yours)” works can be touched, used, or changed; they can be consumed or worn; purchased and even taken free of charge, or carried off in exchange for some personal item.

The exhibition is also a project that continues to evolve and be transformed. At “Take Me (I’m Yours),” the public can not only take home one of the thousands of copies of each work— helping to physically empty out the space—but alter the appearance of the show by taking part in performances where the interaction may involve an experience rather than an object, in keeping with the notion of immateriality that increasingly pervades both art and everyday life.

Presented for the first time in 1995 at the Serpentine Gallery in London—and in varying iterations in Paris, Copenhagen, and New York from 2015 on—the exhibition grew out of a series of conversations between curator Hans Ulrich Obrist and artist Christian Boltanski about the need to rethink how artworks are shown. Specifically, the project concept began with Quai de la Gare (1993), a Boltanski piece made up of piles of used clothing that visitors could pick out and carry off in a bag printed with the word “Dispersion”: a work innately destined to scatter and vanish.

In Milan, alongside Christian Boltanski’s Dispersion, the works of over forty artists will be installed in the thousand-square-meter Shed at Pirelli HangarBicocca, also popping up outside the exhibition space with projects for the catalogue, bookshop, and web. “Take Me (I’m Yours)” therefore becomes a vast arena for imagining a more direct, engaging way to experience art, where the idea of giving and receiving helps us look at the broader social and historical picture of our time in a different light.

In addition to the exhibition at Pirelli HangarBicocca, Museo Nacional de Arte Decorativo in Buenos Aires is presenting another version of “Take Me (I’m Yours)” (From 14 September 2017 to 5th November 2017), curated by Christian Boltanski and Hans Ulrich Obrist.

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In “Take Me (I’m Yours)”, i lavori si possono toccare, usare o modificare; si possono consumare o indossare; si possono comprare e perfino prendere gratuitamente, o magari portare via lasciando in cambio cimeli personali.

La mostra è anche un progetto che si evolve e si rigenera nel tempo. Accanto alla possibilità di prendere una delle migliaia di copie di ciascuna opera prodotta – e quindi concorrere a svuotare fisicamente lo spazio – il pubblico di “Take Me (I’m Yours)” ne modifica l’aspetto anche partecipando a performance in cui lo scambio non è necessariamente legato a un oggetto ma piuttosto a un’esperienza, assecondando un’idea di immaterialità che è sempre più presente tanto nell’arte quanto nella vita reale.

Allestita per la prima volta nel 1995 alla Serpentine Gallery di Londra – e a partire dal 2015 in versioni ogni volta diverse in istituzioni a Parigi, Copenhagen e New York –, la mostra ha avuto origine da una serie di conversazioni e riflessioni tra il curatore Hans Ulrich Obrist e l’artista Christian Boltanski sulla necessità di ripensare i modi in cui un’opera d’arte viene esposta. In particolare, l’idea per il progetto è iniziata con Quai de la Gare (1993), un lavoro di Boltanski costituito da pile di vestiti di seconda mano che il pubblico poteva prendere e portare via in una busta marchiata con la scritta “Dispersion”: un’opera destinata per sua natura a disperdersi e a scomparire ma anche ad acquisire nuova vita al di fuori del museo.

A Milano, accanto a Dispersion di Christian Boltanski, le opere di oltre quaranta artisti sono allestite nei mille metri quadrati dello Shed di Pirelli HangarBicocca, prendendo vita anche al di fuori dello spazio espositivo con progetti per il catalogo, il bookshop, il web. “Take Me (I’m Yours)” si trasforma così in una grande arena in cui si immagina un modo più diretto e coinvolgente per vivere l’arte e in cui anche, l’idea di donare/ricevere diventa una chiave alternativa per leggere lo scenario globale della storia e società contemporanea.

Oltre alla mostra in Pirelli HangarBicocca, il Museo Nacional de Arte Decorativo di Buenos Aires presenta un’altra versione di “Take Me (I’m Yours)” (Dal 14 Settembre 2017 to 5 Novembre2017), curata da Christian Boltanski e Hans Ulrich Obrist.

Lucio Fontana “Ambienti/Environments”
Curated by Marina Pugliese, Barbara Ferriani & Vicente Todolí - In collaboration with Fondazione Lucio Fontana

21 September – 25 February
Thursday – Sunday
10 am-10 pm

Opening 20 September From 7 pm to midnight

Via Chiese 2, 20126

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Curated by art historian Marina Pugliese, conservator Barbara Ferriani, and Pirelli HangarBicocca Artistic Director Vicente Todolí. In collaboration with Fondazione Lucio Fontana.

Pirelli HangarBicocca in Milan presents Ambienti/Environments, a groundbreaking exhibition that brings together for the first time nine of Lucio Fontana’s seminal Ambienti spaziali, displayed throughout the gallery’s 5,000-square-metre space. Fontana’s pioneering work in the realm of installation art highlights the farsighted, innovative genius of this 20th century master.

Visitors to a major exhibition which will be staged at 15,000-square-metre Pirelli HangarBicocca in Milan will be able to walk through several of Lucio Fontana’s celebrated Ambienti spaziali (Spatial Environments) featuring different forms and colors which unfold through rooms, corridors and labyrinthine paths. As the public moves through and lingers within them, they gain a full sense of the amazing iconic and aesthetic power that makes these works so innovative even today. The show Ambienti/Environments, opening on September 20, 2017, has been developed in collaboration with Fondazione Lucio Fontana.

Ambienti/Environments opens with the environmental intervention Struttura al neon per la IX Triennale di Milano (Neon Structure for the 9th Milan Triennale, 1951), which Fontanaconceived as a decorative element for the 9th Milan Triennale. This vast arabesque, made up by hundred-meters-long neon tubes, hangs at the entrance to the exhibition space, ushering visitors into the series of environments, displayed in chronological order. They start with the first one the artist made, Ambiente spaziale a luce nera (Spatial Environment in Black Light, 1948–49), presented at Milan’s Galleria del Naviglio in 1949. It is a dark room lit by an ultraviolet lamp; suspended at the center is an abstract sculpture painted with fluorescent colors.

The public then encounters Utopie (Utopias), two corridors created in collaboration with artist and architect Nanda Vigo for the 13th Milan Triennale in 1964. These two works begin to foreground the perceptual experience of the visitor, through the use of neon lights and optical tricks, an aspect that Fontana also focused on in Ambiente spaziale (Spatial Environment), an installation conceived for his first and only large-scale solo show at an American museum, the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, in 1966, reconstructed here at Pirelli HangarBicocca for the first time. Through a lowered tunnel with a slanted floor, visitors enter a room with neon light shining through its perforated walls.

The next three Spatial Environments employ maze-like designs and colored neons to alter the space and viewing experience. Ambiente spaziale (Spatial Environment), Ambiente spaziale con neon (Spatial Environment with Neon), Ambiente spaziale a luce rossa (Spatial Environment with Red Light), all reconstructed for the first time at Pirelli HangarBicocca, were originally conceived for the European tour of the American solo show and presented in 1967 at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam and later at the Van Abbemuseum in Eindhoven. Straight after, visitors walk through Ambiente spaziale (Spatial Environment), conceived for the exhibition “Lo spazio dell’immagine” at Palazzo Trinci in Foligno the same year.

The last environment in the exhibition, presented in 1968: Ambiente spaziale in Documenta 4in Kassel (Spatial Environment in Documenta 4, in Kassel) has been installed at the end of the chronological sequence in the Navate, since it dates from the year the artist passed away. This work takes the form of a white maze leading to a large slit in the wall.

Ambienti/Environments winds up in the Cubo space with the second environmental intervention Fonti di energia, soffitto di neon per “Italia 61," a Torino (Energy Sources, Neon Ceiling for “Italia 61” in Turin) a monumental work made from seven levels of colored neon tubes, which Fontana designed for the Energy pavilion at the celebration for the centenary of the Unity of Italy in Turin in 1961.

The exhibition catalog will present the most up-to-date research into Fontana’s environments, featuring essays by Luca Massimo Barbero, Paolo Campiglio, Enrico Crispolti, Barbara Ferriani, Jennifer Josten, Orietta Lanzarini, Marina Pugliese, Anne Rana, Giovanni Rubino and Maria Villa.

Osgemeos “Efêmero”
curated by Cedar Lewisohn

21 April – 23 April
Thursday – Sunday
10 am-10 pm

Opening 20 April

Via Chiese 2, 20126

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Pirelli HangarBicocca presents the new public mural, Efêmero, the first large-scale mural in Italy by OSGEMEOS, who are among the world’s most renowned contemporary artists. This work on the outer walls of Pirelli HangarBicocca, to be inaugurated on April 20, 2016, is part of the new three-year project “Outside the Cube," which will involve innovative new approaches to art in public space and a rich calendar of parallel events. The industrial site of Pirelli HangarBicocca, where in the last century trains were made, will become the ideal setting for the work of OSGEMEOS and the many artists to follow.

The project at Pirelli HangarBicocca will delve deeper into the artist’s unique universe of mysterious symbolism and alternative realities. OSGEMEOS’s works often huge in scale, matched with its distinctive patterns and colour schemes, referencing the natural world and improvisation of Sao Paulo. The project will explore the history and spectacular architectural setting of Pirelli HangarBicocca, using the site as a starting point for an iconic new production. The mural will not only be painted on the buildings facade but be incorporated into the buildings architecture. This is an ongoing theme in the artists work, to create murals that transform the facade of a building into a new structure. The project will be accompanied by a limited edition catalogue designed by the artists. The book will explore further the artists history of architectural interventions and include images of their works that have repurposed the built environment.

Curated by artist and writer Cedar Lewisohn - who has authored many publications on art, and curated the exhibition “Street Art at Tate Modern” in 2008 - the project by OSGEMEOS will occupy the two outer walls of Pirelli HangarBicocca’s Cubo space, covering a total area of a thousand square meters. It will also be visible from the nearby train tracks and from the street.

OSGEMEOS, literally meaning “the twins,” is the pseudonym of Brazilian twin brothers Gustavo and Otavio Pandolfo (b. 1974 in Sao Paulo). This artistic duo, whose roots are in hip-hop culture and graffiti, began in the 1980s to develop a highly sophisticated oeuvre recognizable for its dreamlike landscapes and poetic figures, drawing on a vast range of cultural, social and political references.

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Alejandro G. Iñárritu
CARNE y ARENA (Virtually Present, Physically Invisible)

07 June – 15 January
Via online booking only
Infos and bookings: www.fondazioneprada.org

Opening 07 June 10am (bookings only)

Fondazione Prada Milano
Largo Isarco 2, 20139

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Alejandro G. Inarritu’s “CARNE y ARENA (Virtually Present, Physically Invisible),” a virtual reality installation produced by Legendary Entertainment and Fondazione Prada, will be presented in its extensive full version at Fondazione Prada in Milan from 7 June 2017 until 15 January 2018, after its world premiere in the 70th Festival de Cannes.

Based on true accounts, the superficial lines between subject and bystander are blurred and bound together, allowing individuals to walk in a vast space and thoroughly live a fragment of the refugees’ personal journeys. “CARNE y ARENA” employs the highest, never-before- used virtual technology to create a large, multi-narrative light space with human characters.

The experimental visual installation “CARNE y ARENA” is a six and half minute solo experience that reunites frequent collaborators Alejandro G. Inarritu and three-time Academy Award®-winning cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki alongside producer Mary Parent and ILMxLAB.

“During the past four years in which this project has been growing in my mind, I had the privilege of meeting and interviewing many Mexican and Central American refugees. Their life stories haunted me, so I invited some of them to collaborate with me in the project,” said four-time Academy Award-winner Inarritu. “My intention was to experiment with VR technology to explore the human condition in an attempt to break the dictatorship of the frame, within which things are just observed, and claim the space to allow the visitor to go through a direct experience walking in the immigrants’ feet, under their skin, and into their hearts.”

As stated by Germano Celant, Fondazione Prada’s Artistic and Scientific Superintendent, “with ‘CARNE y ARENA’, Inarritu turns the exchange between vision and experience into a process of osmosis in which the duality between the organic body and the artificial body is dissolved. A fusion of identities arises: a psychophysical unity in which, by crossing the threshold of the virtual, the human strays into the imaginary and vice versa. It is a revolution in communication in which seeing is transformed into feeling and into a physical engagement with cinema: a transition from the screen to the gaze of the human being, with a total immersion of the senses. Inarritu’s project perfectly embodies Fondazione Prada’s experimental vocation and its long-lasting engagement towards the correlation between cinema, technology and the arts.”

With the inclusion of “CARNE y ARENA” in the Official Selection, Inarritu continues his longstanding history with the Festival de Cannes, having premiered his first feature film, “Amores Perros,” the Critics Week Grand Prize winner, in 2000 and subsequently presented

“Babel,” for which he won the Best Director Award, in 2006, and “Biutiful” in 2010 as part of the Official Selection. Lubezki’s work has also appeared at Cannes in 2000’s “Things You Can Tell Just by Looking at Her,” which won the Un Certain Regard Prize, and in Terrence Malik’s Palme d’Or-winning “The Tree of Life” in 2011.

Access to the installation will only be available via online booking. More detailed info can be found at the following link: http://www.fondazioneprada.org/project/carne-y-arena

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“Famous Artists from Chicago. 1965-1975” / “H. C. Westermann” / “Leon Golub”
Curated by Germano Celant

20 October – 15 January
Mon / Wed / Thu, 10 am-8 pm
Fri / Sat / Sun, 10 am-9 pm

Opening 19 October From 7 pm to 9 pm

Fondazione Prada
Largo Isarco 2, 20139

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From 20 October 2017, Fondazione Prada will present at its Milan venue a research and information program on the Chicago art scene developed in the aftermath of World War II. The Fondazione thus further expands its strategy of reinterpretation of those moments in contemporary art history that, although not entirely acknowledged by critics, have nonetheless influenced new generations of artists, from graffiti to neo-digital artists. The project is focused on the employment of a painting style characterized by political commitment, figurative narratives and radical graphics, and therefore rejected by mainstream New York culture – which was more interested in the abstract and impersonal dimensions of art. The exhibition is structured around three thematic sections conceived and curated by Germano Celant as a whole – “Leon Golub”, “H. C. Westermann” and “Famous Artists from Chicago. 1965-1975” – all devoted to two generations of artists formed in Chicago between the 50’s and the 60’s. This project further investigates the artistic production of those two decades in a location far from the main artistic centers, from Paris to New York, and explores the development of alternative scenes generated in art schools and academies, namely the School of Art Institute of Chicago, which critically competed or opposed Minimal Art’s industrial and essential approach.

“Famous Artists from Chicago. 1965-1975”, hosted on the ground floor of the Podium, has been conceived as an in-depth analysis of the artists active throughout the 60’s and 70’s, who were featured in shows that questioned traditional exhibition set-up and presentation conventions, such as “Hairy Who” (1966-‘67), “False Image” (1968-‘69), “Nonplussed Some” (1968-’69), organized at the Hyde Park Art Center in Chicago, and itinerant exhibition “Made in Chicago”, first presented at the São Paulo Biennial in 1973. The title of the show highlights the necessity, expressed by curator and teacher Don Baum, to launch Chicago artists into the national and international scene.
“Famous Artists from Chicago. 1965-1975” depicts the energy of the cultural environment of this American city as a center for figurative production, as well as the heterogeneity of the contributions of some artists known as Chicago Imagists (Roger Brown, Ed Flood, Art Green, Gladys Nilsson, Jim Nutt, Ed Paschke, Christina Ramberg, Suellen Rocca and Karl Wirsum), who had identified the roots of their personal research in Surrealism and Art Brut, in a way that anticipated the new tendencies of the 80’s and 90’s, from Graffiti to Street Art, from wild cartoons to urban murals.

The section devoted to H. C. Westermann reunites on the first floor of the Podium more than 50 sculptures of different dimensions, realized between the 50’s and the 90’s, along with a selection of works on paper.
Westermann (Los Angeles, 1922 – Danbury, 1981) began his career in Chicago where, after serving in the army as a Marine, studied Applied Arts at the School of the Art Institute. The exhibition explores his peculiar, intense approach to wood carving which he derived from traditional carpentry. The refusal of formalism and his predilection for found materials, along with his nostalgic take on old America and a critical gaze on the brutality of present times, have become key inspiration elements for the next generations of artists, active in Chicago or elsewhere, from Jeff Koons to KAWS (Brian Donnelly).

“Leon Golub”, the first part of the project, is hosted in the Fondazione’s Nord and Sud galleries, and explores two complementary aspects of the artist’s production, displaying 27 acrylic paintings on canvas of spectacular dimensions, realized between the late 70’s and the early 80’s, and more than 50 photographs painted on transparent paper in the 90’s. Golub (Chicago, 1922 – New York, 2004), since his formative years in Chicago, developed a personal approach to figurative painting, detaching himself from the dominant styles of New York School’s Action Painting and Abstract Expressionism.
The exhibition focuses on the political aspects of his work, which openly denounces the brutality of war, racism, torture and violence. Throughout his life, his subjects became more extreme, such as his direct references to the Vietnam war, which, once depicted on large canvases – in the Mercenaries series, for instance – become symbols of the paramilitary conditions of contemporary life. In his photographic transparencies, Golub manipulates and alters existing images of the same dramatic and tragic subjects which, after being photocopied and photographed, are transferred by the artist onto transparent sheets that emphasize the rough realism of his work.

 

SLIGHT AGITATION 3/4: GELITIN

20 October – 26 February
Mon / Wed / Thu, 10 am-8 pm
Fri / Sat / Sun, 10 am-9 pm

Opening 19 October From 7pm to 9pm

Fondazione Prada
Largo Isarco 2, 20139

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Fondazione Prada will present “Slight Agitation 3/4: Gelitin”, the third chapter of the exhibition project conceived by Fondazione Prada Thought Council, whose members are Shumon Basar, Cédric Libert, Elvira Dyangani Ose, and Dieter Roelstraete. The press preview will be held on Thursday 19 October from 10 am to 1 pm.

“Slight Agitation”, a four-part project of newly commissioned, site-specific works hosted in sequence within the Cisterna in the Milan venue of Fondazione, continues with a third instalment by the Austrian collective Gelitin. Their work follows on from Tobias Putrih (Slovenia, 1972) and Pamela Rosenkranz (Switzerland, 1979), while Laura Lima (Brazil, 1971) will produce the final chapter.

Following Tobias Putrih’s installation which engaged with ideas of play, politics and emancipation and Pamela Rosenkranz’s intervention that offered visitors a multi-sensory immersion into a new perception of embodiment and collectivity, Gelitin present a project titled POKALYPSEA-APOKALYPSE-OKALYPSEAP. Three large sculptures explicitly address classical architectural archetypes (the triumphal arch, the obelisk and the amphitheater), subverting their rhetoric and monumental components. Symbols as much as structures conceived for everyday inhabitation, these sculptures draw an arc from the insular and individual to the open-ended and collective, from the overtly erotic to the sublimated joy of togetherness. This intervention is indicative of the group’s artistic practice which, since the 90’s, has experimented with the reinterpretation of totalitarian art and performance, developing a radical attitude towards institutions. Their work has anticipated the codes of relational aesthetics and invented a sculptural language and approach to installation that are anarchic and irreverent.

The central space of the Cisterna is occupied by Arc de Triomphe (2003 / 2017), the reproduction of an elephant-high male figure, bending over backwards, made of plasticine. As much as the shape and the dimensions of this sculpture are reminiscent of the roman arch, the presence of a fully functioning water fountain, incorporated as a phallic element, transforms the exhibition space into a collective one, truly manifesting Gelatin’s liberating artistic approach.

In the left-hand space there is a giraffe-high sculpture, made up of polystyrene blocks, that could resemble a typical Inuit construction, a monumental obelisk or a cigar on top of a big table.

The third of the three sculptures, a wooden upward spiral, is reminiscent of an antique amphitheater.

Not only can visitors enter the sculpture and sit on the bleachers, but they are also invited to smoke a cigarette in the center of the installation. Those who decide to share this banal action with the other members of the audience become the protagonists of a short, ephemeral act that, according to Gelitin, positions itself somewhere between Samuel Beckett’s Theater of the Absurd and a karaoke performance.

As stated by Dieter Roelstraete, “in the tripartite story of POKALYPSEA-APOKALYPSE- OKALYPSEAP the fundamental question is one that quite literally questions the fundaments of sculpture as given, for instance, in the traditionally three-fold way of matter’s manifestation in the known universe: solid (plasticine, styrofoam, wood), liquid (the triumphal arch’s well-aimed water jet), gas (cigarette smoke, the settling dust all around); or in the liquid logic of matter’s preferred paths of ‘transitioning’—freezing and melting; condensing and evaporating”

The title of the project - “Slight Agitation”- was inspired by the poetic expression “une légère agitation”, employed by the French historian Fernand Braudel to describe the tidal movement of the Mediterranean. This metaphor reflects the Thought Council’s starting point in presenting interventions by artists whose practices differ considerably in philosophical and material terms, all of them commissioned to interfere and dialogue with the spatial context of the Cisterna, and to influence the viewer’s physical experience and all her or his attendant senses through their works.

“Questioning Pictures: Stefano Graziani”

09 November – 26 February
Mon / Wed / Thu, 10 am-8 pm
Fri / Sat / Sun, 10 am-9 pm

Opening 09 November from 2 pm

Fondazione Prada/ Osservatorio
Fondazione Prada/ Osservatorio, 20121

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La mostra, curata da Francesco Zanot, include un nuovo corpus di opere commissionate dalla Fondazione che esplorano la fotografia come strumento di narrazione, catalogazione e reinterpretazione.

Graziani indaga sistemi di archiviazione e conservazione di musei come il Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA) di Montreal, il Sir John Soane’s Museum di Londra, il Kunstmuseum Basel, il Museum Insel Hombroich di Neuss, il Museo di Castelvecchio a Verona e la gipsoteca del Museo Canova a Possagno, concentrandosi sul rapporto ambivalente tra fotografia e oggetto museale. Il fotografo si muove su un territorio ambiguo: da una parte svolge un lavoro di documentazione di materiali diversi come disegni e modelli architettonici, libri, fotografie e dipinti, dall’altra intraprende un percorso di interpretazione attraverso un uso attento delle luci e degli angoli di ripresa e l’inclusione nei suoi scatti di elementi di disturbo. Le sue fotografie non solo rivelano raccolte museali e archivi a cui solitamente il pubblico non ha accesso, ma li riattivano secondo logiche e prospettive del tutto soggettive.

Come sostiene Francesco Zanot, “Questioning Pictures” è “una sorta di crash-test progettato per verificare la capacità del museo di resistere agli attacchi esterni e aumentarne proporzionalmente la porosità. Trasforma l’invisibile in visibile scongiurando l’eventualità di una successiva inversione di questi termini, e mettendo così in luce uno dei principali meccanismi attraverso cui i musei generano e controllano il proprio potere. Anche le norme imposte dai musei per la riproduzione dei materiali in collezione svolgono la medesima funzione. Graziani le elude sistematicamente compiendo un atto di resistenza. È un gesto di disobbedienza civile esercitato attraverso l’adozione di un rigore etico e formale che ricorda le fotografie di Walker Evans e Lewis Baltz. Si confronta con un dato indiscutibile: ‘Poiché la macchina fotografica è letteralmente un apparecchio per archiviare, ogni fotografia è... a priori un oggetto d’archivio’, come sostiene Okwui Enwezor. E si impegna nella fabbricazione di un anti-archivio”.

Attraverso un dispositivo allestitivo, concepito dallo studio OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen come un sistema di paraventi colorati e modulabili, disposti sui due livelli dell’Osservatorio, si creano degli accostamenti visivi e semantici inaspettati tra le fotografie e tra gli oggetti rappresentati. Il modello di un edificio di Aldo Rossi è collegato a un disegno di Gordon Matta-Clark, un album fotografico di fine Ottocento su Pompei è accostato a un plastico del Pantheon in mostra al Sir John Soane’s Museum di Londra, un gesso di Antonio Canova conservato a Possagno dialoga con le Tre Grazie di Lucas Cranach esposte al Kunstmuseum Basel e ancora una maquette di un progetto utopico di Cedric Price è associata a un prototipo di tavolo disegnato da Mies van der Rohe. Ciò che unisce questo

insieme eterogeneo di oggetti e opere d’arte è il pensiero di Graziani, la cui visione li trasforma in nature morte, disorientanti e inattese. “Enigmatiche proprio come la natura della fotografia che emerge qui in maniera lampante: documento-non-documento”, come osserva Zanot.

In questo progetto, la fotografia funziona inoltre come un nastro trasportatore, un collettore, un veicolo di trasmissione in grado di ricollocare e accostare opere lontane nello spazio e nel tempo e spesso impossibili da trasferire concretamente da un luogo all’altro. Inoltre opera come uno strumento che, attraverso sottili deviazioni, minime alterazioni e interpretazioni personali, scardina i sistemi di archiviazione e catalogazione tradizionali per conferire una nuova visibilità, e quindi una nuova vita, a documenti, materiali e opere d’arte conservati in raccolte museali. All’interno di questi archivi Graziani introduce dei “virus visivi e intrepretativi” e compie un’azione di “hackeraggio” che innesca una catena potenzialmente infinita di nuove analisi ed enigmi.

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Eva Rothschild

17 November – 27 January
Tuesday – Saturday
11 am – 7.30 pm

Opening 16 November From 7pm

Via di Porta Tenaglia 7, 20121

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kaufmann repetto is pleased to announce the fourth solo exhibition in Milan of new sculptures by Eva Rothschild. The show pairs recent works together with new sculptures conceived specifically for the gallery space. The exhibited works include a number of recurring motifs in Rothschild’s practice: tumbling geometric shapes, stacks of modular elements, cast objects, columns. A combination of familiar and unexpected forms is a pivotal aspect in Rothschild’s oeuvre, simultaneously resonating with and shifting symbolic and pictorial meanings. Aspects of plurality and multi-part assembly are embedded in the artist’s practice, which deals at the same time with a very specific set of materials and colours. The durability of steel is paired with a soft cushion element in Witness (2017), and employed with a graphic, drawing-like effect in the two sculptures A Gated Community (2016). Rough blocks of jesmonite are piled up (Ruins, 2016) or flattened in black painted, wall-mounted panels (Europa and Bold Europa, 2017). A sense of lost or corrupted monumentality resonates among the works on show, as well as a tension of verticality and ascension - an attempt by the artist to occupy the space in all its dimensions. Titles are an integral part of Rothschild’s works. Rather than commenting on or solidifying the physical presence of the works, her titles are used as a tool to create further space around them. As the artist stated in a recent interview with The Brooklyn Rail, “while the work might appear almost wholly formal in some pieces, the titles are there to break that formality apart, and to add this layer of language that misdirects you, perhaps, from what the work itself is doing.” Elaborating on and challenging the formal traditions of minimalism, Rothschild references culture, history and symbolic suggestion to build complex webs of precedents and associations which can be both familiar and disorienting. Her open-ended artworks encourage the viewer to question their own assumptions about how we experience objects in the world.

kaufmann repetto è lieta di annunciare la quarta mostra personale di Eva Rothschild negli spazi della galleria di Milano. La mostra comprende una selezione di lavori recenti dell’artista, in dialogo con sculture inedite concepite per gli spazi della galleria. Le opere esposte incorporano motivi ricorrenti nella produzione di Rothschild: forme geometriche in bilico su piedistalli, pile di elementi modulari, calchi di oggetti, colonne. L’accostamento di forme familiari - mutuate tanto dal paesaggio domestico quanto dal vocabolario formale della storia dell’arte - con elementi inusuali e carichi di rimandi simbolici si conferma un aspetto fondamentale nel lavoro di Eva Rothschild. Modularità e assemblaggio sono delle costanti nella pratica dell’artista, che al contempo si confronta con una scala ben precisa di materiali e colori. L’acciaio, con la sua durabilità, incontra la morbidezza di un cuscino in Witness (2017) o è declinato in imponenti strutture dall’aspetto grafico, simili a disegni nello spazio (A Gated Community, 2016). Grossi blocchi di jesmonite vengono incolonnati in Ruins (2016) o appiattiti in sottili pannelli da muro (Europa e Bold Europa, 2017). Un senso di monumentalità perduta, o corrotta, sembra risuonare tra le opere in mostra, che condividono anche una tensione alla verticalità - un tentativo dell’artista di occupare lo spazio della galleria in tutte le sue dimensioni. I titoli sono per Rothschild parte integrante delle opere. Anzichè commentare o convalidare la presenza fisica dei lavori, però, essi vengono utilizzati come strumento per creare un’ulteriore apertura. Come l’artista ha affermato in una recente intervista per The Brooklyn Rail: “mentre l’opera può sembrare prettamente formale in alcuni suoi aspetti, i titoli sono lì per rompere questo formalismo e aggiungere un livello di linguaggio che devia dall’oggetto”. Rielaborando i canoni formali del minimalismo, il lavoro di Eva Rothschild mischia riferimenti culturali, storia e simbologie per costruire una complessa ragnatela di rimandi e associazioni, che possono risultare riconoscibili quanto sconcertanti. Le opere rimangono aperte all’interpretazione e invitano l’osservatore a mettere in discussione le modalità con cui si relaziona agli oggetti nel mondo.

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Grazia Varisco “ne ho solo 80...”

08 November – 10 February
Monday-Friday
10.30 am - 7 pm

Opening 08 November From 6 pm to 8.30 pm

Corso di Porta Nuova 46/B, 20121

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At its recently opened Milan venue, Cortesi Gallery is pleased to present
ne ho solo 80… (“I’m only 80”), an exhibition dedicated to Grazia Varisco on her 80th birthday.

Intended as an homage to the artist’s long career, it features works and studies—some shown here for the first time—from very different periods, highlighting the investigation she has assiduously, systematically pursued for almost sixty years now.

Moving through the show, visitors encounter a constant succession of experiments that strive to maintain and convey an interest in the interplay of rules and chance within the flow of time.

It is an investigation that keeps pausing for reflection and picking up again; from a formal standpoint, it unfolds through a range of different images in which one can make out a single guiding thread.

Since Varisco’s initial kinetic phase with Gruppo T, she has travelled a path of inquiry centered on revealing the connections between space and time, through perceptual and interactive experiences.

Her artistic practice is still ongoing and vibrant, and the selection of works on view presents various aspects of Grazia’s oeuvre: from magnetic games, to modifications of visual rules, to dynamic explorations of the image, all tied together by a single imperative: discipline of vision.

 

Cortesi Gallery è lieta di presentare nella recente sede milanese
la mostra “ne ho solo 80…”, dedicata agli 80 anni di Grazia Varisco.

Con questa mostra Cortesi Gallery intende rendere omaggio alla lunga carriera dell’artista presentando lavori e studi anche inediti, realizzati in tempi molto diversi in cui risalta la ricerca che si è sviluppata in modo rigoroso e coerente per quasi sessanta anni.

Un percorso che si articola e mette in mostra esperienze che si inseguono costantemente tese a mantenere e trasmettere interesse tra regola e casualità nel divenire del tempo.

Una ricerca con pause e riprese di riflessione che formalmente si racconta in immagini diverse nelle quali si riconosce un filo rosso di sostanza.

Dagli inizi cinetici in condivisione con i compagni del Gruppo T sperimenta una ricerca tesa a far risaltare il rapporto spazio tempo nelle esperienze percettive e interattive.

La sua attività artistica è ancora vivace ed in atto; la selezione delle opere esposte restituisce diversi aspetti della ricerca di Grazia: dai giochi magnetici, alle alterazioni delle regole visuali, all’esplorazione dinamica dell’immagine, il tutto unito da un unico imperativo: la disciplina del vedere.

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Sol LeWitt “Between the Lines”
Curated by Francesco Stocchi & Rem Koolhaas - in collaboration with Estate Sol LeWitt

17 November – 23 June
Monday – Friday by appointment | Saturday free entry
11 am-6 pm

Opening 16 November from 5pm by appointment

Via Cino del Duca, 4, 20122

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One decade after the death of Sol LeWitt (Hartford, 1928 – New York, 2007), Between the Lines aims to offer a new perspective on the American artist’s practice, exploring its confines—though always adhering to the underlying norms and principles of his ideas—and singling-out the most interesting moments of the method of investigation and the processes that may arise. With a considerable body of work spanning his entire career—from the famous Wall Drawings to sculptures like Complex Form and Hanging Structures, up to the photo series Autobiography 1980—and starting from the peculiarities of the rooms at the Foundation, the exhibition explores the relationship between LeWitt’s work and architecture.

Between the Lines is based on a powerful and innovative key to interpretation, aimed above all at reformulating the idea that a work must adapt to the architecture, thereby challenging the very notion of site-specificity. With full participation by the architect Rem Koolhaas—as a curator, for the first time ever—in dialogue with the curator Francesco Stocchi, Between the Lines faces broad aspects of LeWitt’s oeuvre, with the ambitious goal of moving beyond the division that traditionally separates architecture and art history and which characterizes the artist’s entire body of work, aimed more at the process than at the final result, free from any aesthetic or idealist opinion.

In 1967, LeWitt published in the magazine Artforum his “Paragraphs on Conceptual Art”—considered, even today, fundamental to understanding conceptual art—decreeing the importance of the idea over the execution, thus attributing more relevance to the notion, to the process rather than to the object and, therefore, marking the beginning of a gradual reduction of the artwork to an elementary state. In this text, LeWitt coins the term “conceptual,” paving the way for an idea of art and a way of working that was—and still is—important for generations of artists. The artist’s task is to formulate the project, whereas its execution can be entrusted to anyone, provided the instructions be respected. His belief in the artist as the creator of ideas adds a new dimension to his role, likening it to the figure of an architect who creates a design for a building and then entrusts its construction to others.

Yet, the theory LeWitt professed is vaster than imagined: it is the certain, measured degree of randomness established by the individuality of the one who will execute the work to expose it to the pathos of artistic creation, to the sense determined by the inner coherence of the linguistic system and, therefore, by the method and not the result per se. Moving freely within the rules. Like when, for example, in commemoration of his friend Eva Hesse, the artist introduces “non-straight lines” in his Wall Drawings and abandons himself to the understanding (and the interpretation) of the one who executes, further reinforcing a disinterest for any form of aesthetics in favor of respect for rules, thus making his works immortal since they can renew themselves each time.

At this point the role of architecture (and of the architect) becomes part of assessing LeWitt’s work, not only for the affinity in planning ideas but for the ability both have to reshape space. Sol LeWitt’s works cannot be considered sculptures or paintings or even architectural structures. Instead, they are Structuresforms inserted into the space, taking shape midway between the two-dimensional and the three-dimensional. Their geometric regularity makes them perfect “bases” for his wall drawings—multiplied, transformable into patterns, and repeatable in an infinite number of white, black, or colored shapes, either solid or open. These forms reveal their loyalty to flat images while at the same time they challenge gravity, triggering a reflection that joins wall paintings and sculptures, thereby creating an access between “dimensionality” and “construction.” Many of these figures are oblivious to their surroundings and their features; they cross doors and walls, thus creating continuity in the architecture without being conditioned by the specificity of the place in which they develop. Therefore, they cover the entire history of wall painting. The work is imbued with that location, though it wasn’t necessarily conceived for it, and, thus, it reveals a new metaphysical space made not with lines, cubes, or other geometric shapes, but with the idea of those very lines, cubes, and shapes.

The exhibition at the Fondazione Carriero stems from the desire to explore the confines of LeWitt’s work, considering his postulates as part of a new and freer system of verification, and to propose new harmony between the three-dimensional figure and the two-dimensional surface.

Between the Lines is an integral part of the program begun by the Fondazione Carriero with imaginarii(September 2015), FONTANA • LEONCILLO Forma della materia (April 2016), FASI LUNARI (October 2016), and PASCALI SCIAMANO (March 2017), exhibitions curated by Francesco Stocchi whose focus is their exchange approach and constant strive for research and experimentation.

The exhibition is made possible thanks to a close collaboration with the Estate of Sol LeWitt and to loans from prestigious public institutions, like the Whitney Museum of American Art (New York), as well as important private collections, like the Collezione Panza.

The Wall Drawings on display at the Fondazione Carriero were executed in collaboration with young artists and students in Milan, under the close supervision of the Estate of Sol LeWitt.

The show will be accompanied by a catalogue (Italian/English), published by the Fondazione Carriero and edited by Francesco Stocchi, which gathers images of the works installed at the Foundation, with contributions by the curators Francesco Stocchi and Rem Koolhaas, a scholarly text written for the occasion by the architect and art historian Adachiara Zevi, and a previously unpublished biography, illustrated with personal and archive images, many of which have never been seen before and compiled for the publication by Sofia LeWitt, the artist’s daughter.

 

Nel decennale della scomparsa di Sol LeWitt (Hartford, 1928 – New York, 2007), Between the Linesintende offrire un punto di vista nuovo sulla pratica dell’artista statunitense, esplorandone i confini – nel rispetto di quelle norme e di quei principi alla base del suo pensiero – e isolando i momenti fondanti del suo metodo di indagine e dei processi che ne derivano. Attraverso un nutrito corpus di opere che ripercorrono l’intero arco della sua carriera – dai celeberrimi Wall Drawings alle sculture come Complex Form e Hanging Structures, fino alla serie fotografica Autobiography 1980 –, e partendo dalla peculiarità degli spazi della Fondazione, il progetto espositivo esplora la relazione del lavoro di LeWitt con l’architettura.

Between the Lines si basa su una chiave di lettura forte e innovativa, tesa innanzitutto a riformulare l’idea che sia l’opera a doversi adattare all’architettura, fino ad arrivare a sovvertire il concetto stesso di site­specific. Con il pieno coinvolgimento dell’architetto Rem Koolhaas – per la prima volta nella veste di curatore – in dialogo con il curatore Francesco Stocchi, Between the Lines affronta ampi aspetti dell’opera di LeWitt, con l’obiettivo ambizioso di superare quella frattura che tradizionalmente separa l’architettura dalla storia dell’arte e che caratterizza l’intera pratica dell’artista, rivolta più al processo che al prodotto finale, e scevra di qualsiasi giudizio estetico o idealista.

Nel 1967 LeWitt pubblica sulla rivista Artforum il testo “Paragraphs on Conceptual Art” – considerato tutt'oggi basilare per la comprensione dell'arte concettuale – che sancisce il primato dell’idea sull’esecuzione, attribuendo così maggior rilievo al concetto e al processo rispetto all’oggetto, segnando l’inizio della progressiva riduzione al grado primordiale dell’opera d’arte. Nel testo LeWitt conia il termine “concettuale”, aprendo la strada a un'idea di arte e a un modo di lavorare che sarà – e continua a essere – rilevante per le successive generazioni di artisti. Il compito dell'artista è dunque quello di formulare il progetto, la sua esecuzione invece può essere affidata a chiunque, purché si rispettino le istruzioni stabilite. Il suo credere nell'artista come generatore di idee ha aggiunto una nuova dimensione al suo ruolo, avvicinandola alla figura di un architetto che crea un progetto per un edificio e poi delega la produzione effettiva ad altri.

Tuttavia, il teorema che LeWitt professava è più ampio di quanto s’immagini: è quel certo, misurato, grado di casualità determinato dall’individualità dell’esecutore ad aprire l’opera al pathos della creazione artistica, al senso determinato dalla coerenza interna del sistema linguistico, e dunque dal metodo e non dall’esito di per sé. Muoversi liberi all’interno di regole. Quando ad esempio, in memoria dell’amica Eva Hesse, l’artista introduce nei suoi Wall Drawings “le linee non dritte”, si abbandona alla comprensione (e all’interpretazione) dell’esecutore, rafforzando ulteriormente il disinteresse per ogni forma di estetica a favore dell’attenzione per la regola, rendendo così le sue opere immortali perché capaci di rinnovarsi ogni volta.

È a questo punto che si inserisce il ruolo dell’architettura (e dell’architetto) nella valutazione dell’opera di LeWitt, non solo per l’affinità nella progettualità delle idee, ma per la capacità che entrambi hanno di rimodellare lo spazio. Le opere di Sol LeWitt non possono essere considerate sculture, né opere pittoriche e neanche strutture architettoniche, si tratta piuttosto di Structures forme inserite nello spazio, a metà tra la bidimensionalità e la tridimensionalità. La loro regolarità geometrica le rende “basi” perfette per i suoi disegni a parete, moltiplicabili, trasformabili in pattern e replicabili in un numero infinito di forme bianche, nere, o colorate, solide o aperte. Sono forme che rivelano il loro attaccamento all'immagine piatta ma al tempo stesso sfidano la gravità, innescando una riflessione che unisce dipinti a parete e sculture, creando una porta d’accesso tra “dimensionalità” e “costruzione”. Molte di queste forme sono incuranti dell’ambiente e delle sue caratteristiche, attraversano porte e pareti in continuità con l’architettura senza essere condizionate dalla specificità del luogo in cui si sviluppano, ripercorrendo in questo modo l’intera storia della pittura murale. L’opera si permea di quel luogo ma non è necessariamente pensata per esso, e in questo modo rivela un nuovo spazio metafisico fatto non di linee, cubi o altre forme geometriche, bensì dell’idea di quelle stesse linee, cubi o forme.

La mostra alla Fondazione Carriero nasce dunque dal desiderio di esplorare i confini dell’opera di LeWitt, considerando i suoi postulati all’interno di un nuovo e più libero sistema di verifica, e di proporre una nuova armonia tra figura tridimensionale e superficie bidimensionale.

Between the Lines si inserisce coerentemente nel percorso iniziato dalla Fondazione Carriero con imaginarii (settembre 2015), FONTANA • LEONCILLO Forma della materia (aprile 2016), FASI LUNARI(ottobre 2016) e PASCALI SCIAMANO (marzo 2017), mostre curate da Francesco Stocchi il cui punto cardine è l’approccio dialogico e la tensione costante verso ricerca e sperimentazione.

La mostra è resa possibile grazie alla stretta collaborazione con l’Estate of Sol LeWitt e a prestiti provenienti da prestigiose istituzioni pubbliche, come il Whitney Museum of American Art (New York), e importanti collezioni private, come la Collezione Panza.

Wall Drawings esposti negli spazi della Fondazione Carriero sono eseguiti con la collaborazione di giovani artisti e studenti milanesi, sotto la fondamentale supervisione della Estate Sol LeWitt.

La mostra è accompagnata da un catalogo (italiano e inglese) edito da Fondazione Carriero, curato da Francesco Stocchi, che raccoglie le immagini delle opere allestite in Fondazione, con contributi dei curatori Francesco Stocchi e Rem Koolhaas, un saggio scritto per l’occasione dall’architetto e storica dell’arte Adachiara Zevi e una biografia inedita, illustrata con immagini personali e d’archivio, molte delle quali mai pubblicate prima, curata per l’occasione da Sofia LeWitt, figlia dell’artista.

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